Cattleya trianaei 'Cashen's' FCC/AOS is blooming

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dmcmkl

ST Supporter - from Minnesota
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I purchased a division of Cattleya trianaei 'Cashens' FCC/AOS from Waldor Orchids back in November of 2022. When I repotted early in 2023 it fell apart into two separate clumps. This is the first one to bloom. It has two spikes with the second spike just starting to open after I took this picture of the first. The second clump has one spike and is about two weeks away from blooming itself.
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Each spike only has one flower. Is this to be expected with 'Cashens'?
 
Well it has been my experience that Cattleyas like this go through a period of adjustment. It went from Waldor to you at a minimum. How long had it been at Waldors?
But my point is that plants, especially species need to get acclimated to new conditions in order to perform at their best.
It may take another year or two to perform better in your environment.
Nothing is remotely automatic. Many different factors enter in the the growing and flowering. Watering, light, fertilizer, etc. It would be really nice if a plant would present you with three flowers time after time after time. But that doesn’t always happen. There are some plants that do that maybe, but no where near all of them!
 
Well it has been my experience that Cattleyas like this go through a period of adjustment. It went from Waldor to you at a minimum. How long had it been at Waldors?
But my point is that plants, especially species need to get acclimated to new conditions in order to perform at their best.
It may take another year or two to perform better in your environment.
Nothing is remotely automatic. Many different factors enter in the the growing and flowering. Watering, light, fertilizer, etc. It would be really nice if a plant would present you with three flowers time after time after time. But that doesn’t always happen. There are some plants that do that maybe, but no where near all of them!
And even many of the awarded trianae plants only have two flowers on each inflorescence so don't feel bad about one flower!
 
I also got a division of the original plant from Waldor that same fall in Sept, 2022. So we have the same plant. Mine has not been repotted, although it needs it now. It bloomed in May and had two flowers on 1 inflorescence. I probably got two flowers because the plant had not gone through the stress of repotting, and since it fell into two clumps, technically divided. Hang in there, you’ll get more flowers. Here is a link to my post with photos of that bloom.
https://www.slippertalk.com/threads/cattleya-trianae-cashen’s’-fcc-aos.56124/
 
Gorgeous! Trianae are known to be less floriferous than some of the other large-flowered unifoliates. Chadwick’s mentions that this is usually offset by two successive growths flowering at once, giving the same “net effect” in terms of flower count. Two flowers per stem is common. I’ve certainly seen plenty of Cashens photos where it only has 1. The FCC flowering had 5 flowers on 3 stems with a 2-2-1 conformation. So I agree with the above, once the plant settles in you should see some spikes with 2 flowers.
 
Gorgeous! Trianae are known to be less floriferous than some of the other large-flowered unifoliates. Chadwick’s mentions that this is usually offset by two successive growths flowering at once, giving the same “net effect” in terms of flower count. Two flowers per stem is common. I’ve certainly seen plenty of Cashens photos where it only has 1. The FCC flowering had 5 flowers on 3 stems with a 2-2-1 conformation. So I agree with the above, once the plant settles in you should see some spikes with 2 flowers.
Yes, I agree from experience. The only trianae I have that regularly, and often, will have 3 per inflorescence is C. trianae v. semi-alba flamea ‘Kathleen’. Right now it has 12 flowers on 5 inflorescences. 3, 3, 2, 2, 2 and 6 more sheaths. But that plant is a growing and blooming machine.
 
Yes, I agree from experience. The only trianae I have that regularly, and often, will have 3 per inflorescence is C. trianae v. semi-alba flamea ‘Kathleen’. Right now it has 12 flowers on 5 inflorescences. 3, 3, 2, 2, 2 and 6 more sheaths. But that plant is a growing and blooming machine.
Sounds spectacular, hope we get to see some photos soon!
 
Yes, I agree from experience. The only trianae I have that regularly, and often, will have 3 per inflorescence is C. trianae v. semi-alba flamea ‘Kathleen’. Right now it has 12 flowers on 5 inflorescences. 3, 3, 2, 2, 2 and 6 more sheaths. But that plant is a growing and blooming machine.
Well, I suspect you're feeding it beef & potatoes.

-Patrick
 
This flowering is small and narrow for Cashen’s, and needs more strength to reach its potential. But definitely a Cashen’s. Really a good attempt though!
 
Dr. Leslie. Can you provide some measurements from the FCC award so I can check them against my blooming? This morning I measured the width of the petals at 14cm.
Thanks!
 

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