To be insigne - or not to be!

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

GuRu

experienced greenhorn
Supporting Member
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
5,420
Reaction score
1,692
Location
Germany
It doesn't look like insigne to me. It has some blood of villosum in it, I think.

First of all, I think it's a lovely flower which I like a lot. So congrats, Jens. 👌
When I look at the flower I'm not sure if their is an influence of another species, maybe P. villosum like fibre mentioned.....but the leafs are really long and wide for an P. insigne. But who knows?
 

Guldal

ST Supporter
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Messages
3,773
Reaction score
1,872
Location
Copenhagen, Denmark
This is a plant not bought from any of my usually reliable sources...and not one I'm particularily touchy about (as I in other instances am renowned be! 😁).
My own thoughts, actually, went more in the direction of exul, when the flower opened, but checked the synsepalum, that has some spotting...but I think, I would count some possible influence from that direction more likely.
Am not at home right now, but will have to do some research on the staminodal shape, when I get home!
 

Happypaphy7

Paphlover
Joined
Aug 14, 2014
Messages
7,507
Reaction score
1,559
Location
New York City
I agree. While insigne had many forms, most of which are long lost, this looks like a hybrid. Just saying. With so many complex being made and distributed, many of which unfortunately without tags, there are surprising number of things that are shockingly similar to species or primary hybrids. I knew about this but was shocked to see it first hand in Europe, Portugal to be specific.
In the US, breeders focus on awardable flower shape, so often, those round flowers are around in the market. On my vacation to Portugal, there were vast array of shapes and sizes of these complex hybrids. None of them had tags.
 

DrLeslieEe

Scholar, Addict and Aficionado of Orchidacea
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
5,689
Reaction score
5,989
Location
TORONTO CANADA
The issue with this unconfirmed flower is that it has elements of insigne/villosum/gratrixianum features that make it very hard to discern where the the truth lies. There are many cases in Europe where a group of plants are labeled as a species because they look similar 'enough' to the namesake and therefore tagged and sold as such to the unbeknownst public.

If such a plant shows up on our table here in judging, we would judge as the name and send for confirmation to SITF (species identication center) to confirm ID. Once confirmed, any award given to it is verified.

I don't think such an ID system is in the RHS or other judging centers around the world?
 
Top