Phragmipedium hirtzii

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naoki

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I purchased it from Peruflora in 2013. It was fairly large plants when I got it. It recovered from the importation fairly quickly (I seem to experience more initial leaf/growth dropping with wet Phrags than other orchids after importation). It grows at a good pace (I guess most of this types of Phrags have a fast pace).

The staminode is supposed to have no hair, but if you magnify, you can see some residual hairs. Hmmm.


Phragmipedium hirtzii on Flickr


Phragmipedium hirtzii on Flickr


Phragmipedium hirtzii on Flickr


Phragmipedium hirtzii staminode and lip on Flickr


Phragmipedium hirtzii staminode on Flickr

The color balance is screwed up a little with this one, but here is the lack of "horns" of the pouch (Eliseo pointed this out in the page 2 of this thread).

Phragmipedium hirtzii on Flickr


Phragmipedium hirtzii plant on Flickr

The leaves became a bit yellow around the area too close to the light source (COB-LED: Cree CXA3070 3000K @ 50W).
 
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mrhappyrotter

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Great species. The problem with phrag species is I want them all, but some of them are expensive and/or hard to find.

I love the wet growers. While I haven't gone through to importation process with any plants, I do know that the water loving phrags are almost universally quick growers (may not apply to species, though), and when provided with new growing conditions and potting mix, they go into a growth spurt to adapt, which usually means dropping older leaves. Usually the leaf drop is predictable ... when you see multiple roots and new growths splitting the base of old leaves or pushing them off the plant, the leaf death is inevitable.
 
P

Paph_LdyMacBeth

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What a plant!!
Thanks for all the great photos!

Sent from my BlackBerry Bold 9900 using Tapatalk
 

SlipperKing

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Hun.. maybe the original describer didn't have a magnifying glass.
Nicely bloomed and photograhed
 

Secundino

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Great photographs, as always - thanks for sharing this beautiful flowered plant. Looking at Phrags is addictive ...
 

naoki

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Hun.. maybe the original describer didn't have a magnifying glass.
I probably should check the original description, I was just going with the info from PhragWeb. Could it be from natural hybridization/introgression?

I believe the one I have is also a Ecuagenera sourced plant (though swapped from a friend). I think mine has a little more ruffling t the petals but otherwise about the same. What kind of leaf length/width are you getting?

http://www.slippertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=30437
Rick, I remember your thread. You are right; the "ruffle" part is the difference, but they look similar. Do you remember the hair on the staminode? The leaf length is 16" (40cm) and the width is 5/8" (1.6cm). The shadier side can extend to about 18".

Great species. The problem with phrag species is I want them all, but some of them are expensive and/or hard to find.

I love the wet growers. While I haven't gone through to importation process with any plants, I do know that the water loving phrags are almost universally quick growers (may not apply to species, though), and when provided with new growing conditions and potting mix, they go into a growth spurt to adapt, which usually means dropping older leaves.
I don't have lots of Phrags, but they appear to show more rapid metabolism (than Paphs) as you said. I usually don't remove older leaves because I want all nutrients to be recycled, so I had to remove lots of old brown leaves before taking photos.

Peruflora Phrags seem to be very affordable. It was originally 1/2 to 2/3 of the current size (maybe around 10 growths at that time?) but it was only $28. I was expecting a single growth, actually. The other Phrag from them was also a giant.

Your plant looks like a monster.
It does take up quite a bit of space, indeed (it's in 6" pot), but fortunately, it isn't as tall as other Phrags.
 

eteson

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Nice plant!
It is very similar to my clones...see page 2 in the Rick's link... and very different from the other ones from Ecuagenera.
Your plant and mine does not have the typical horns in the pouch characterizing Lorifolia section. It is very interesting.
 

naoki

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Nice plant!
It is very similar to my clones...see page 2 in the Rick's link... and very different from the other ones from Ecuagenera.
Your plant and mine does not have the typical horns in the pouch characterizing Lorifolia section. It is very interesting.
Thanks, Eliseo. If I look at the photo of your plant more carefully, I can see a bit of hairs on the top edge of the staminode. The shape of the pouch is very slightly different; yours seem to have pointy pouch. On mine, the right flower has the widest point in the middle of the pouch, but the left flower does have the widest point at the top of the opening (but less pointy than yours). So the shape appears to be somewhat plastic, and influenced by the environment.

I wonder where Peruflora plant is originated from.

I'm not familiar with Phrags, and what is the "typical horns in the pouch" for the Lorifolia section?
 

eteson

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Naoki, yes the pouch of your plant is slightly different but the overall flower is very similar... what i mean with "the horns in the pouch margin" is this: (drawing from the original description, side view of the pouch)



The plant described has a pouch shape similar to boissierianum and even the ruffling in the petals seems to me boissierianum influenced (I do thing that there could be some degree of hybridation between hirtzii and boisierianum)... on the other hand your plant is much more close to the Colombian ones... It would be great to know the origin of your plant... but I am pretty sure that it comes from the northernmost part of Ecuador or the south of Colombia (most likely the second one).
 

Rob Zuiderwijk

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A very nice specimen, that I would definitly call a hirtzii, whatever the haircut of the staminode. I agree that there seems to be some variation, but that is the case with all the other species/taxa as well.

Great photos. Thanks for sharing.

All the best,

Rob
 

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