What is the difference between P.hirsutissimum and P.esquirolei?

Discussion in 'Taxonomy' started by Inguna, Apr 9, 2011.

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  1. Apr 9, 2011 #1

    Inguna

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    Good afternoon!
    Two years ago I bought this paphiopedilum. The plant was not labelled, but I was rather sure that it is Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum. Later I discovered that exists also P.hirsutissimum var. esquirolei or P.esquirolei. But I don't really understand what is the difference between hirsutissimum and esquirolei? How to tell them appart, and what do I have? :D
    Thanks!
     

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  2. Apr 9, 2011 #2

    SlipperKing

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    Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum= hairy stems and ovaries, esquirolei supposable has less to none. Very tough call in most cases.
     
  3. Apr 9, 2011 #3

    Rick

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    This question has been posed in about half the threads started on this species and its varieties. Here's a link to one of the most recent discusions on this.

    If you have access to Slipper Orchids of Vietnam by Averyanov, that has one of the better taxonomic descriptions of all 3 varieties discussed in one place.

    http://www.slippertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20010&page=3

    As Rick said the main difference is degree of hairyness. But esquirolei flowers are also somewhat bigger than straight hirsutisimum flowers.

    I don't think there are black and white divisions of these guys in the wild which is why some taxonomists treat them as varieties of the nominal species (hirsutisimum) rather than individual species. Plus there has been a lot of interbreeding of the varieties so everything is a mishmash now anyway. So based on degree of hairyness and size, a big flower with relatively naked stem would be var. esquirolei ish, and a smaller flower with hairyer stem would be var. hirsutisimum ish.

    And since these are relatively subjective terms you need to have one of each in hand to tell the difference:poke::poke:
     
  4. Apr 10, 2011 #4

    SlipperFan

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    What you have is a very well grown plant with lots of beautiful flowers!
     
  5. Apr 10, 2011 #5

    SlipperKing

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    And what Dot said "is all that matters"
     
  6. Apr 10, 2011 #6

    NYEric

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    Wow, serious enabling of the unindoctrinated!
    I agree, thanks for posting.
     
  7. Apr 10, 2011 #7

    Inguna

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    Hi! Thanks for compliments!
    SlipperKing and Rick thank you for explanation:) This morning I checked my plant again. Flowers are 15 cm. Stems and ovaries are hairy, but without reference and comparison I am not able to estimate their 'degree of hairiness'.

    So I hope that it will not be wrong if I leave it as Paphiopedilum hirsutissimum without any more precise specification.
     

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  8. Apr 10, 2011 #8

    Rick

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    Here's a pic of the ovary/stem of a plant I have that is very "typish" for var. esquirolei.

    The flowers are pushing 16 cm. The leaves are very stiff and erect compared to a different plant I have.
    [​IMG]

    In comparison your flower definitely is hairier.
     
  9. Apr 10, 2011 #9

    Inguna

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    It is, indeed:) Thanks a lot!
     
  10. Apr 10, 2011 #10

    Rick

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  11. Apr 10, 2011 #11

    Inguna

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    Thanks Rick, you are very kind:)
     
  12. Apr 10, 2011 #12
    Great growing!!! :clap::clap:
    might I add that hirsutissum is colder grower, esquiroli grows warm. I have both & can't bloom either, so maybe I should switch them! :p
     
  13. Apr 11, 2011 #13

    JeanLux

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    You have a very nice specimen plant there :clap: !!!! Jean
     
  14. Apr 11, 2011 #14

    Inguna

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    goldenrose and Jean, thank you both. The plant was rather big already when I bought it. It didn't get smaller since then and flowers every spring :rollhappy:
     
  15. Apr 11, 2011 #15
    then maybe esquirolei? which supposedly blooms spring (March-May), hirsut - winter? and of course that only applies if the plant read the book!
    The confusion continues.......
     

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