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Semi Hydro Question

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Mrs. Paph

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Don't take this as gospel, but I'd say light doesn't matter any more than if you had plants in a conventional mix growing in a clear pot. Personally I just like to see what's going on with my plants roots, so I use clear pots if I have one handy in the right size. Another part of the reason for clear pots could just be to help sell people on the 'new' media type - if you can't see your plant growing new roots and don't want to disturb them pulling it out to check, then how can you be impressed with the new media and want to buy more for other plants in your collection? Just my thoughts.
~Miss Paph
 

gonewild

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I think it does not matter. Most epiphytic orchids naturally have some or all of their roots growing exposed to light.

The light intensity hitting the sides of the pots is pretty low so it is not like the roots are exposed to strong light.

Clear pots won't help the plants adjust to s/h nor will they hinder it.

Clear pots simply let you be satisfied when you see all your beautiful roots growing. Or get worried when you don't see anything happening.
 
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Mrs. Paph

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A very good point, I guess I was only commenting on slippers when I said that light doesn't matter - if you had something like a Phal in S/H it might grow more roots In the pot with some light being able to get through the sides of a clear pot. Bottom line, I haven't heard of clear pots being in any way negative to root growth.
 

gonewild

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Miss Paphiopedilum said:
A very good point, I guess I was only commenting on slippers when I said that light doesn't matter - if you had something like a Phal in S/H it might grow more roots In the pot with some light being able to get through the sides of a clear pot. Bottom line, I haven't heard of clear pots being in any way negative to root growth.

I have never heard of clear pots being prooven to be a problem either.

After 40 years of discrimination and oppression clear plastic pots rule!

Way back in the olden days when plastic pots were first invented.... (Yes I remember when... we used to grow cymbidiums in metal food cans that the local prisoners dipped in tar).... The first attempt at making clear pots was a disaster, the clear plastics back then crumbled after a few months of exposure to sunlight. White plastic pots would last about a year or so without cracking. Black plastic seemed to last forever, so forever plastic pots are supposed to be black? If plastics had been better 40 years ago clear pots would be the norm now and not something new.
 

Ray

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I have heard people express concern that the "greenhouse effect" in a clear pot will cook the roots, but as far as I'm concerned, it's crap. The moisture evaporation will keep them comfortable.

Incidentally, the plastics aren't any different now - polyethylene, for example, is still polyethylene - but the UV inhibitors added to them have improved greatly.
 

gonewild

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Ray said:
I have heard people express concern that the "greenhouse effect" in a clear pot will cook the roots, but as far as I'm concerned, it's crap. The moisture evaporation will keep them comfortable.
You are right they are wrong about the greenhouse effect causing a clear pot to overheat. In reality black and other dark colors absorb heat and may cause an overheathing effect. White would reflect more heat and so it should be the coolest choice for a pot. Who grows their plants in sunlight so strong it will overheat the pots anyway?

Incidentally, the plastics aren't any different now - polyethylene, for example, is still polyethylene - but the UV inhibitors added to them have improved greatly.
Are you sure there have been no new plastic formulas in the last 40 years?
I sure don't remember any plastic strong enough to make a car out of. ;)
But from a consumers viewpoint when you add different ingredients to a base plastic it becomes a different plastic.
 

gonewild

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NYEric said:
The only concern I have about clear pots in hydro or S/H is the growth of algae on the roots.
I remember we argued about ... I mean discussed.... that before.
What did we decide? Is algae good, bad or ugly?
 
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johnndc

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Jury is out on the algae, but I've noticed that my best roots seem to grow in pots that also have algae. I tend to welcome it, and at least in my case pots have never been overrun with it to the point that it was clogging anything up.
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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The algae that I have begun to see in a few of my SH pots is Cyanobacteria, many of which are nitrogen-fixing...in this respect, the algae could well be quite beneficial.....Take care, Eric
 

Ray

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In my experience with algae, ugly is the limit on the negative end.

Lance - a lot of the plastics used in cars (and lots of other stuff) are based on ABS (acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene) chemistry, but not for flower pots. They seem mostly limited to polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene and a few variants of them.

There are also a lot of polyurethanes out there, but again, not in pots. Oh yeah, and polycarbonates.

Unfortunately, almost none of the plastics are inherently UV stable.
 

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