Paph. delenatii question

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kman

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I need the observations of some of you experienced with growing Paph. delenatii. I grew this species in the early 90s, but my memory of that time with them is not particularly clear. This last winter I obtained three single growth seedlings - one “regular”, one var. album and one var. dunkel. They flowered nicely early in the year, and aside from a couple of new roots I’ve seen have done nothing for several months. The leaves look quite heathy and are not visibly deteriorating. Growing in a greenhouse with good climate control and what has been successful culture for many other species.

My question: What is the typical time from end of bloom to the emergence of new growths? Is it seasonal?

Many thanks.
 
I cut the flower stem on my Paph. delenatii (also a single growth seedling) sometime in mid May and I noticed a new growth had begun last week, the week of June 3rd.
 
In my experience, if properly grown, delenatii is almost always doing something. The 'key' is obviously 'happy' or properly grown.

In my first 28 years in a greenhouse on Long Island, I did not have a whole lot of success with Brachy's. I think in looking back, my greenhouse was terribly inadequate in terms of humidity. Never cut short the value of humidity. Think of where they often are found growing. "in the leaf litter on top of limestone outcroppings. Those words did NOT describe my Long Island greenhouse. There I struggled to maintain a 50% humidity level when they prefer 70-80%, if not more.
This has become apparent in my last 6 to 7 years in Michigan, under lights. Here my winter humidity levels are 55-60% at worse and 75-80% at best. And the even light levels afforded by my plant carts have really helped in my opinion. Plus my media has changed. I used to use something more akin to a Phalaenopsis mix. Now it is 50% fine grade bark, 20% fine grade charcoal, and 20% fine grade perlite. And yes, that is not 100%, it is just rough estimations. Perhaps a little bit of leca works its way in or perhaps medium grade bark to bring that % up to 100%? AND I religiously water every 3 days during the winter and every 4 to maybe 5 days in the summer. My lights run 10 hours per day during the winter months up to 12 hours a day during the summer. An oscillating fan blows across them all the time.
I sincerely hope that this helps you!!!
 
Thanks for the info.

I maintain humidity at 65 to 80 percent - usually at the higher end - using an Aquafog TurboXE Fogger. We've had to rebuild it once but this unit is now just short of 30 years in service. So low humidity is not the issue.
 
I have a delenatii alba that I bought last summer that seems to like to primarily focus on one thing at a time, and it's felt slow! I actually felt like it wasn't growing at all for a while so I started taking weekly pictures of it. And surprise! It was indeed growing. Just slow! The bigger of 2 new growths that I bought it with grew a lot, then slowed down and the plant grew a bunch of fat roots (I have it in a clear pot nested in another pot so I can check). Now, with many new roots established it is growing new leaves on both the bigger new growth and the othet teeny tiny one that has barely grown for a year. Maybe with more perfect conditions it would be faster, but being that it was getting used to my conditions for the last year I think it's done alright!
When I bought it on August 23, 2023 (it had flowered that spring):
Screenshot_20240619_134935_Photos.jpg
Screenshot_20240619_135002_Photos.jpg
A better picture of the two new growths (it was already losing a leaf after being with me for about a month here. It lost 2-3 thus far I think):
Screenshot_20240619_134446_Photos.jpg
Today, bigger new growth is visible on the right (ruler was for another thread question):
20240619_094242.jpg
It seems like the new growths had barely popped up when I bought it. This is 10 months of growth. The seller said they bloomed like clockwork for him every spring, so if I had his exact conditions it sounds like a growth would emerge and reach blooming size within a year. He was in a greenhouse in Baltimore and I move around the country and am now in Montana though so that is very different for the poor plant!
 
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In my experience, if properly grown, delenatii is almost always doing something. The 'key' is obviously 'happy' or properly grown.

In my first 28 years in a greenhouse on Long Island, I did not have a whole lot of success with Brachy's. I think in looking back, my greenhouse was terribly inadequate in terms of humidity. Never cut short the value of humidity. Think of where they often are found growing. "in the leaf litter on top of limestone outcroppings. Those words did NOT describe my Long Island greenhouse. There I struggled to maintain a 50% humidity level when they prefer 70-80%, if not more.
This has become apparent in my last 6 to 7 years in Michigan, under lights. Here my winter humidity levels are 55-60% at worse and 75-80% at best. And the even light levels afforded by my plant carts have really helped in my opinion. Plus my media has changed. I used to use something more akin to a Phalaenopsis mix. Now it is 50% fine grade bark, 20% fine grade charcoal, and 20% fine grade perlite. And yes, that is not 100%, it is just rough estimations. Perhaps a little bit of leca works its way in or perhaps medium grade bark to bring that % up to 100%? AND I religiously water every 3 days during the winter and every 4 to maybe 5 days in the summer. My lights run 10 hours per day during the winter months up to 12 hours a day during the summer. An oscillating fan blows across them all the time.
I sincerely hope that this helps you!!!
 
I just wanted to update that now that our long, cold spring is over in Montana, my kitchen corner where my delenatii sits has had higher temps lately, upper 70s into 80s, a good part of the day. I've immediately noticed that growth has taken off! It's been slow and steady regardless, but I think if I'd been able to keep it consistently this warm it probably would grow fast enough to bloom every year for me. Unfortunately that's hard to do in a camper in the PNW!
 
I've always run all of our plants with higher light than is normally recommended. A methodology that has proved beneficial for most everything: Cattleya types, Mexican Laelias, Zygos, Australian Dendrobiums, Odontoglossums, Disa, Phrags, most Paphs and Cymbidiums. I do heavily shade Masdevallias. Here on the coast of Northern California we have foggy and overcast conditions quite often in the summer, so the light is often moderated. Plants tend to be more compact and leaves smaller, thicker and with greater disease resistant.

Our climate has changed quite abruptly over the last decade, and the sun's intensity has greatly increased. I wonder if I've reached a breaking point with the light intensity for some of the low light Paph species. Anyone else seeing this?

Update on the Paph. delenatii: All three varieties are now showing new growths. Slower than expected but progress nonetheless.
 
I think you’re doing fine. It took me a lot of years to figure out delenatii; I have 5 clones of it, none younger than 8 years, that bloom annually, one that blooms twice annually and some seedlings.

For me, it likes high light. Mine all sit in south and southeast “failed” double-pane windows with natural shading from our hard rainwater. I water weekly with K-Lite/RO. Leaves are perfect. I do a couple doses of Cal-Mag in spring and a big flush with tap water (it’s hard; 350ppm) about every 3 months.

I use pumice and limestone in my mixes for these. 1/3 Hausermann’s bark, 1/3 limestone chips, 1/3 pumice. I pack a little damp sphagnum around the collar when I see roots aborting into the air but I don’t keep that sphagnum wet, just incidental wetness from watering.

I never, ever let water into the delenatii crowns. If it happens by accident, I take a paper towel corner and blot it up. I also never let leaves themselves get wet except when they’re dusty and then I set a fan right on them until the water is gone.

it’s such a wonderful species abd I hope yours will be fragrant.
 
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