Phrag Yoko W. Fischer

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This cross was made in 2010 by Orchids Limited and I was fortunate to first report its blooming in 2016. With the agreement of Jerry Fischer and his wife Yoko, we registered the hybrid as Phragmipedium Yoko W. Fischer. The cross is Peruflora’s Cirila Alca (kovachii x dalessandroi) x besseae ‘Rob’s Choice’. The Peruflora’s Cirila Alca is thought to be diploid while besseae ‘Rob’s Choice’ is known to be tetraploid, so this hybrid should be triploid (3N) and likely a dead end for further breeding.
Yoko.jpeg
This picture is from the 4 day-open first flower of my third blooming of the plant. This photo was taken outside in the morning without direct light on the flower. The background is a dahlia plant. The natural spread of the width is 12 cm but it might still increase modestly over the next week.

Phrag besseae was officially described in 1981. In 1985, Dennis D'Alessandro described a new population of plants that many considered a new species that was named Phrag dalessandroi. This new species was described as different from besseae: "Instead of having bright, dark red flowers with the petals acute and held stiffly outward, plants of the Zamora population have more yellow in the flowers, and the petals are obtuse at the apex and hang downward a bit. The inflorescences are shorter and more compact, and the plants are much easier to cultivate than those of the other populations."

However, the controversy about dalessandroi being a separate species continued from 1985 until about 1997 when several groups decided that it should be named besseae var. dalessandroi. But this decision did not penetrate well because the RHS did not change the hybrids that had been made with dalessandroi up until 1997 to synonyms of the same crosses that had been made with besseae.

In addition, Fritz Schomburg (FS) (kovachii x besseae) out of Piping Rock was accepted by the RHS on March 7, 2007 and then Peruflora’s Ciriila Alca (kovachii x dalessandroi) out of Peruflora was accepted on June 11, 2007. If RHS considered dalessandroi to be a var. of besseae, they wouldn't have accepted the PCA registration. The PCA parent used in this Yoko W. Fischer cross was shown in a Slippertalk post in 2010 by Robert-Jan Quene of Orchids Limited in which he showed the differences between Peruflora’s Cirila Alca and Fritz Schomburg.

Phrag. Fritz Schomburg vs Peruflora's Cirilia Alca

Several recent new hybrids show the continued stance by RHS. Piping Rock registered the back-cross of PCA to dalessandroi as Ekolu in 2011 and they registered the cross Peruflora's Spirit x dalessandroi as Ekolu Quintal in 2014. The acceptance of Phrag Yoko W. Fischer (YWF) indicates that the RHS still considers dalessandroi to be separate from besseae for hybridization purposes.
 
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Sometimes a plant that should be a triploid (coming from a known diploid x tetraploid cross) will occasionally breed. There are genetic reasons for this, but overall, breeders don’t make triploids for their breeding programs. They make them because they can be great plants to grow and bloom. Triploids often grow better than tetraploids and can have great flowers. A hobbyist can be very happy with triploids.
 

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Yay besseae hybrids! Thanks for sharing. I saw my first manzurii plants yesterday. Due to the bloom, I previously thought manzurii was just a type of schlimii. Now I know the foliage is totally different, and it probably should be a separate species.
 

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For the record, I think besseae and dalessandroi are two different species.

They grow differently vegetatively (dalessandroi climbs upwards) and florally (dalessandroi has slightly smaller flowers with drooping narrower petals, and different shade of blood red-orange rather than orange-red, on multiple branching spikes that can carry more blooms open). They also confer this spike branching habit to its hybrids.

One look at the hybrids you can tell by the narrow petal stance and spike habit.
 

KateL

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For the record, I think besseae and dalessandroi are two different species.

They grow differently vegetatively (dalessandroi climbs upwards) and florally (dalessandroi has slightly smaller flowers with drooping narrower petals, and different shade of blood red-orange rather than orange-red, on multiple branching spikes that can carry more blooms open). They also confer this spike branching habit to its hybrids.

One look at the hybrids you can tell by the narrow petal stance and spike habit.
Olaf Gruss has a nice article in the current AOS Orchids magazine about the difference in these two species.
 
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This cross was made in 2010 by Orchids Limited and I was fortunate to first report its blooming in 2016. With the agreement of Jerry Fischer and his wife Yoko, we registered the hybrid as Phragmipedium Yoko W. Fischer. The cross is Peruflora’s Cirila Alca (kovachii x dalessandroi) x besseae ‘Rob’s Choice’. The Peruflora’s Cirila Alca is thought to be diploid while besseae ‘Rob’s Choice’ is known to be tetraploid, so this hybrid should be triploid (3N) and likely a dead end for further breeding.
View attachment 21563
This picture is from the 4 day-open first flower of my third blooming of the plant. This photo was taken outside in the morning without direct light on the flower. The background is a dahlia plant. The natural spread of the width is 12 cm but it might still increase modestly over the next week.

Phrag besseae was officially described in 1981. In 1985, Dennis D'Alessandro described a new population of plants that many considered a new species that was named Phrag dalessandroi. This new species was described as different from besseae: "Instead of having bright, dark red flowers with the petals acute and held stiffly outward, plants of the Zamora population have more yellow in the flowers, and the petals are obtuse at the apex and hang downward a bit. The inflorescences are shorter and more compact, and the plants are much easier to cultivate than those of the other populations."

However, the controversy about dalessandroi being a separate species continued from 1985 until about 1997 when several groups decided that it should be named besseae var. dalessandroi. But this decision did not penetrate well because the RHS did not change the hybrids that had been made with dalessandroi up until 1997 to synonyms of the same crosses that had been made with besseae.

In addition, Fritz Schomburg (FS) (kovachii x besseae) out of Piping Rock was accepted by the RHS on March 7, 2007 and then Peruflora’s Ciriila Alca (kovachii x dalessandroi) out of Peruflora was accepted on June 11, 2007. If RHS considered dalessandroi to be a var. of besseae, they wouldn't have accepted the PCA registration. The PCA parent used in this Yoko W. Fischer cross was shown in a Slippertalk post in 2010 by Robert-Jan Quene of Orchids Limited in which he showed the differences between Peruflora’s Cirila Alca and Fritz Schomburg.

Phrag. Fritz Schomburg vs Peruflora's Cirilia Alca

Several recent new hybrids show the continued stance by RHS. Piping Rock registered the back-cross of PCA to dalessandroi as Ekolu in 2011 and they registered the cross Peruflora's Spirit x dalessandroi as Ekolu Quintal in 2014. The acceptance of Phrag Yoko W. Fischer (YWF) indicates that the RHS still considers dalessandroi to be separate from besseae for hybridization purposes.
Love this!! A beautiful flower named after a beautiful lady, whose significant contribution to all aspects of Orchid's Ltd. deserves this honor!! Interestingly, I just read an article in this month's Orchids Mag. that definitely says it's dalessandroi, not var. dalessandroi. So your bloom and story has perfect timing! Thanks TerryRos.
 
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For the record, I think besseae and dalessandroi are two different species.

They grow differently vegetatively (dalessandroi climbs upwards) and florally (dalessandroi has slightly smaller flowers with drooping narrower petals, and different shade of blood red-orange rather than orange-red, on multiple branching spikes that can carry more blooms open). They also confer this spike branching habit to its hybrids.

One look at the hybrids you can tell by the narrow petal stance and spike habit.
Orchids Magazine this month agrees with you!!
 

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