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PHRAG

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So what are your favorite orchid books? Do you have a large library, or a single volume? Spill the goods.
 

Heather

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I do not have a large library. I just have a handfull. When I first started growing, I acquired several beginner's guides such as Ortho's All About Orchids http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/08...4765/ref=pd_bbs_3/002-4606715-1132057?ie=UTF8 and Taylor's. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/03...4765/ref=pd_bbs_6/002-4606715-1132057?ie=UTF8 Taylor's has very nice photos. They were both useful as a new grower but now I would happily pass them on to another newer grower.
I have a few other books which are more about the history of orchids, but I haven't ever read them.

Last year I went on a mission to begin aquiring the nicer Lady Slipper books, and that will remain my focus from here forward. So far I have Lance Birk's new Paphiopedilum Grower's Manual:
http://www.lancebirk.com/gpage.html2.html

The Genus Paphiopedilum, Volume 1 by Braem, Baker, and Baker. I would like Volume 2 but started with one because it has the multi florals in it. :)
http://www.orchidculture.com/COD/books.html

Novelty Slipper Orchids by Hasegawa and Koopowitz. Hard to find. I got mine from Tim who got a copy off Australian eBay.

and Slippers of Vietnam by Averyanov et. al.
http://www.kewbooks.com/asps/ShowDetails.asp?id=376

All four of them are beautiful volumes which I really enjoy having as part of my larger slipper collection. Which leads me to what I always say at this point in my book tirade...

WHEN is someone going to do one of these on the genus Phragmipedium?
 

slippertalker

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The best information available these days on phrags is the special Orchid Digest issues. They are very informative, covering all of the known species, culture and hybridization including besseae hybrids and newer hybrids.
 
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PHRAG

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Nobody has an orchid encyclopedia? What about the picture books for those of us who can't read? :)
 

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silence882

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I obsess more over slipper literature than I do over the plants, so here are my recommendations:

Slipper-specific:
  • The Paphiopedilum Grower's Manual, by Lance Birk (2004) - A lot of information, but there's no way to know how accurate any of it is. There are no footnotes or even a bibliography. I never reference it. Also, the color of the photos is off. It's not worth the money.
  • Slipper Orchids of Vietnam, by Averyanov, Cribb, Loc & Hiep (2003) - The gold standard of slipper orchid monographs. A great overview of the flora of Vietnam and exhaustively researched and illustrated descriptions of each species. I wish someone would write a book like this for ever country in Asia.
  • Paphiopedilum, by Braem & Chiron (2003) - A revision of Braem's 1988 monograph. It's got very nice summaries of the genus and each species. It's loaded with Braem's characteristic arrogance, so you have to be careful about trusting its analyses and absolute statements. I would definitely recommend it.
  • The Genus Paphiopedilum, vols. 1 & 2, by Braem, Baker & Baker (1998,1999) - A good summation of most of the Paph. species. Since vol. 3 was never written, the series is not complete. Once again, it's chocked full of Braem's arrogance. Braem & Chiron's 2003 monograph encapsulates most of the non-culture info presented here. However, if you're looking for cultural recommendations for each species, I would recommend these books.
  • The Genus Paphiopedilum, by Phillip Cribb (1998) - A revision of his 1987 monograph. A very complete summary of the Paphiopedilum species. Some of his taxonomic decisions are questionable and lack explanation, but overall an excellent book. I would recommend it to every paph grower.
  • The Genus Cypripedium, by Phillip Cribb (1997) - The most complete Cypripedium monograph by far. I would recommend it to anyone with more than a passing interest in cyps.
  • Slipper Orchids of Borneo, by Phillip Cribb (1997) - Very good summaries of the Bornean paphs, but most of the info is reproduced (sometimes word-for-word) in his 1998 monograph.
  • The Slipper Orchids, by Catherine Cash (1991) - I am unsure how much to trust the information that is presented in this book, so I don't reference it.

Great Picture books:
  • Paphiopedilum in Taiwan II (1999)
  • Paphiopedilum in Taiwan III (2003)

Encyclopedias that rule:
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Orchids, by Alec Pridgeon (1992)
  • The Manual of Cultivated Orchid Species, by Bechtel, Cribb & Launert (1992)

My library:
  • Simpson, Michael G. Plant Systematics. Amsterdam: Elsevier Academic Press, 2006.
  • Allikas, Greg, and Ned Nash. The World's Most Beautiful Orchids. San Diego: Thunder Bay Press, 2005.
  • Birk, Lance A. The Paphiopedilum Growers Manual. Santa Barbara, CA: Pisang Press, 2004.
  • Cribb, P.J., and M. Tibbs. A Very Victorian Passion, The Orchid Paintings of John Day, 1863-1888. Blacker Publishing & RBG, Kew, 2004.
  • Averyanov, L. et al. Slipper Orchids of Vietnam. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2003.
  • Braem, Guido J., and Guy Chiron. Paphiopedilum. Saint-Genis Laval, France: Tropicalia, 2003.
  • Hsiao, Yuan-Chuan. Paphiopedilum in Taiwan III. Taiwan Paphiopedilum Society, 2003.
  • Handbook on Judging and Exhibition, 11th Edition. Delray Beach, FL: American Orchid Society, 2002.
  • Watson, James B. Orchid Pests and Diseases. Delray Beach, FL: American Orchid Society, 2002.
  • Fitch, Charles M. Growing Orchids Under Lights. Delray Beach, FL: American Orchid Society, 2002.
  • Levin, D.A. The Role of Chromosomal Change in Plant Evolution. New York: Oxford University Press, 2002.
  • Zachos, Ellen. Orchid Growing for Wimps. New York: Sterling Publishing Co., 2002.
  • Bronstein, Howard, and Ursula Hoffmann. "American Orchid Society Awards, 1932-2001." American Orchid Society. (Compact Disc), 2002.
  • Griffiths, Mark. Orchids from the Archives of the Royal Horticultural Society. New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 2002.
  • Proceedings of the 16th World Orchid Conference, April 1999. Edited by J. Clark et al. Vancouver: Vancouver Orchid Society, 2002.
  • Batchelor, Stephen R. Your First Orchid. Delray Beach, FL: American Orchid Society, 2001.
  • Koopowitz, Harold. Orchids and Their Conservation. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 2001.
  • Sheehan, Thomas J. Ultimate Orchid. New York: DK Publishing, Inc., 2001.
  • Allikas, Greg, and Ned Nash. Orchids. San Diego, CA: Thunder Bay Press, 2000.
  • Hansen, Eric. Orchid Fever, A Horticultural Tale of Love, Lust, an Lunacy. New York: Vintage Departures, 2000.
  • Braem, Guido J., Charles O. Baker, and Margaret L. Baker. The Genus Paphiopedilum, Natural History and Cultivation, Volume 2. Kissimmee, FL: Botanical Publishers, 1999.
  • Noble, Mary. You Can Grow Orchids, Revised Edition V. Jacksonville, FL: McQuerry Orchid Books, 1999.
  • Hsiao, Yuan-Chuan. Paphiopedilum in Taiwan II. Taiwan Paphiopedilum Society, 1999.
  • Ortho's All About Orchids. Meredith Books: Des Moines, IA, 1999.
  • Cribb, Phillip J. The Genus Paphiopedilum. Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia: Natural History Publications & Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, 1998.
  • Braem, Guido J., Charles O. Baker, and Margaret L. Baker. The Genus Paphiopedilum, Natural History and Cultivation, Volume 1. Kissimmee, FL: Botanical Publishers, 1998.
  • Cribb, Phillip J. The Genus Cypripedium. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 1997.
  • ———. Slipper Orchids of Borneo. Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia: Natural History Publications, 1997.
  • White, Judy. Taylor's Guide to Orchids. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1996.
  • Greatwood, J. et al. The Handbook on Orchid Nomenclature and Registration, Fourth Edition. London: International Orchid Commission, 1993.
  • Dressler, Robert L. Phylogeny and Classification of the Orchid Family. Melbourne, Australia: Cambridge University Press, 1993.
  • Stearn, William T. Botanical Latin, Fourth Edition. Portland: Timber Press, 1992.
  • Pridgeon, Alec. The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Orchids. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 1992.
  • Bechtel, Helmut, Phillip J. Cribb, and Edmund Launert. The Manual of Cultivated Orchid Species, Third Edition. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1992.
  • Cribb, Phillip J. The Forgotten Orchids of Alexandre Brun. New York: Grove Press, 1992.
  • Arditti, Joseph. Fundamentals of Orchid Biology. New York: Wiley, 1992.
  • American Orchid Society. 1990 Awards Annual. Tokyo: Shinkikaku Company, Ltd., 1992.
  • Cash, Catherine. The Slipper Orchids. Portland, OR: Timber Press, 1991.
  • Rix, M. Art in Nature: Classic Botanical Prints from the Eighteenth to the Twentieth Century. New York: Rizzoli, 1991.
  • Dressler, Robert L. The Orchids, Natural History and Classification. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1990.
  • Orchid Biology: Reviews and Perspectives V. Edited by J. Arditti. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1990.
  • Hennessy, Esme F., and Tessa A. Hedge. The Slipper Orchids. Randburg, South Africa: Acorn Books, 1989.
  • McCook, Lucile M. "Systematics of Phragmipedium (Cypripedioideae; Orchidaceae)," Cornell University, 1989.
  • Koopowitz, Harold, and Norito Hasegawa. Novelty Slipper Orchids: Breeding and Cultivating Paphiopedilum Hybrids. North Ryde, NSW, Australia: Angus & Robertson, 1989.
  • Braem, Guido J. Paphiopedilum. American Orchid Society, 1988.
  • Stiff, Ruth L.A. Flowers from the Royal Gardens of Kew. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England, 1988.
  • Orchid Biology: Reviews and PerspectivesIV. Edited by J. Arditti. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1987.
  • Withner, Carl.L. A Book of Orchids. New York: William Morrow and Company, Inc., 1985.
  • Proceedings of the Eleventh World Orchid Conference. Edited by Kiat W. Tan. Singapore: Internation Press Co, Ltd., 1984.
  • Orchid Biology: Reviews and Perspectives III. Edited by J. Arditti. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1984.
  • Bennett, Keith S. The Tropical Asiatic Slipper Orchids: Genus Paphiopedilum. North Ryde, NSW, Australia: Angus & Robertson, 1984.
  • Birk, Lance A. The Paphiopedilum Growers Manual. Santa Barbara, CA: Pisang Press, 1983.
  • Graham, Digby, Robin Graham, and Ronald Roy. Slipper Orchids: The Art of Digby Graham. Wellington, NSW, Australia: Reed, 1983.
  • Shuttleworth, Floyd S. et al. Orchids, Revised Edition. New York: Golden Press, 1982.
  • Hernstrom, T.C. Paphiopedilum. TJD Co., 1982.
  • Hunt, David R. Orchids from Curtis's Botanical Magazine. London: Curwen Books, 1981.
  • Ratcliffe, Edna. The Enchantment of Paphiopedilums: Anthology of Facts and Fancies. Didcot, England: Author, 1977.
  • The Orchids, Scientific Studies. Edited by C.L. Withner. NY: Wiley, 1974.
  • Waters, V.H., and C.C. Waters. A Survey of The Slipper Orchids. Shelby, NC: Carolina Press, 1973.
  • Rands, R.J. Paphiopedilum Species. Los Angeles: Author, 1973.
  • Reinikka, Merle A. A History of the Orchid. Miami: University of Miami Press, 1972.
  • Whittle, Tyler. The Plant Hunters. Philadelphia: Chilton Book Co., 1970.
  • Dodson, C.H., and R.J. Gillespie. The Biology of the Orchids. Mid-America Orchid Congress, Inc., 1967.
  • Hawkes, Alex D. Orchids, Their Botany and Culture. New York: Harper & Brothers, 1961.
  • Proceedings of the Third World Orchid Conference. London: Royal Horticultural Society, 1960.
  • The Orchids, A Scientific Survey. Edited by C.L. Withner. NY: Ronald Press, 1959.
  • Watkins, John V. ABC of Orchid Growing. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, Inc., 1956.
  • Sanders' Orchid Guide, Revised (1927) Edition. St. Albans: Sanders, 1927.
  • Williams, Benjamin S. The Orchid Grower's Manual, Seventh Edition. London: Victoria and Paradise Nurseries, 1894.
  • Burbidge, F.W. The Gardens of the Sun. London: John Murray, 1880.
  • Linden, Jean. Pescatorea, Iconography of Orchids. Brussels: M. Hayez, 1860.
  • Lindley, John. The Genera and Species of Orchidaceous Plants. London: Ridgways, Piccadilly, 1830-40.
 

slippertalker

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Silence882,

Your list is so long that I now realize why I won't do the same......My list is just as long and I just don't have the time to catalog every book! Let's just say I have many of the same books, don't have some, and have a few others that you don't.
Fine effort :clap:
 

silence882

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I am far, far too lazy to write out citations. 2 years ago a teacher divulged a few programs (Citation, Endnote) in which you enter the vital stats and it generates bibliographies and footnotes for you. That way I only have to enter the info once and I can generate a list whenever I need it. Best thing ever.

--Stephen

slippertalker said:
Silence882,

Your list is so long that I now realize why I won't do the same......My list is just as long and I just don't have the time to catalog every book! Let's just say I have many of the same books, don't have some, and have a few others that you don't.
Fine effort :clap:
 

TADD

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I agree about the issue's with Birk's book. The one book that I always tend to go to when I reference orchids is Botanica's "Orchids". It is full of pictures, and brief descriptions and regional information. Decent for a beginner.
 
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gore42

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For what it's worth, I've found the information in Birk's book to be very helpful... I don't think that it's ever pointed me in the wrong direction. Granted, there are no citiations... but I think that's just because it's aimed at a popular audience rather then a scientific one. Indeed, I think that the vast majority of his information comes from personal experience anyway, so I suspect most of it wouldn't require citation anyway. Regardless, I find it useful :)

The rest of my books have pretty much been mentioned already... Slipper Orchids of Vietnam, Cash's The Slipper Orchids, The Genus Paphiopedilum - Cribb...

I also sometimes find the Phragmipedium section of Baker and Bakers "Orchid Species Culture" helpful. I don't have their Paph volume.

- Matt
 

Stephan

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As they say about me when I talk computers at work (I have "some" of those books too )

Cough

Cough - nerd

:)

Cheers
Stephan
 

slippertalker

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I have the original version of Birk's paph book, and find it informative although dated. He is not a taxonomist, but he has actually visited many of the locations the plants and has a good concept of the cultural requirements. In many ways his ideas on species variation is more valuable than the taxonomists that haven't seen the plants in situ.
 

Lance Birk

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Silence882 - Stephan Manza

I am really tired of you continuously trashing my book with your stupid and mostly self-serving comments every time the subject arises. What is it with this compulsion you have to display your own limitations? Your failure to recognize the accuracy and quality of my work simply displays your ignorance, your lack of experience and your irresponsibility.

There is a reason why both my editions became two of the best selling orchid books in history; it is because they offer innovative ideas that work. My book is the one that changed orchid growers; from being killers of orchids (see your own tag,”Paph Assassin’), into SUCCESSFUL orchid growers, and my 1st edition book was the tool that initiated the change. Mine was the first book written in English to list and to show photos of all the known paphiopedilums. More importantly, it is unique, as no other book has caused such a revolution in the cultivation of virtually all types of orchids. But first you need to actually read it.

Your comments that my book is a “rant,” and that “the information is available in a dozen other places” acutely displays more of your ignorance. You just don’t get it! I suggest you read the Bulletin and the Orchid Digest and The Orchid Review issues published BEFORE your frame of reference (your own birth date), and become an educated person. Most books on your list came after my book. Many have copied me (without citation), as have other recent authors who now take my principles of culture and apply them to numerous other genera of orchids.

One of your main complaints seems to be that my book has no bibliography. Let me spell this out for you: A bibliography is for authors who employ other people’s ideas as the foundation for their work. I have read (at least once) almost every piece of literature ever written in English (and some in French), and then discarded most of it because I found it just a lot of replicated, bogus data that mostly leads to the death of our cultivated orchids.

My paph book is based on PURE research. Pure research is where you start from scratch and then go out to find what works, on your own. My research on paphiopedilums was done both in the greenhouse and from the jungle; it is something no other person has ever done. If you are unable to comprehend it, then I think you have the problem, not my book. Many thousands of orchid growers have found it offers them great success.

Your comment, “None of his information is ever cited.” is a correct assessment. Mine is a CULTURAL book, not one about taxonomy. This is spelled out quite clearly in the Introduction (both editions), something you yourself could have read, had you bothered; and I put photos in my book for readers to see what each species looks like and to compare with those they have.

I accept your criticism about a few of the color photos. Since I chose to keep the cost of printing low, while still producing a high quality art book, I was forced to accept some discoloration caused by the flow characteristics of inks and by the physical placement of the photos in signatures. I wished photos in mine were as excellent as Cribb's 2nd edition paph book, but I didn’t think it would sell very well at well over a hundred dollars if I demanded such perfection. I believe most readers agree, (ask Phil Cribb).

You probably are an intelligent person and I assume you are simply ignorant and not devious. I really don’t know if you are seeking revenge with me for sending you a courtesy notice regarding your copyright infringement issue concerning graphics from my book, but if you are, I would think you might be grateful that I chose not to prosecute you. But maybe not.

While I agree that Averynov’s book is superb, most people will agree that the quality of photos in my book are quite a lot better. Still, his are more than acceptable to most everyone, and I noticed you failed to criticize them in your commentary. The major point you fail to notice is that just about every orchid grower is more interested in learning how to grow their plants well, than they are in reading taxonomy.

This is why my book remains a best seller.

Meanwhile, stop trying so hard to impress people by your acquisition of book lists and a Web site displaying other people’s data, and instead, go learn what orchids require in order to prosper, and then learn how to grow them because right now you understand neither. Only then might you become knowledgeable, and your opinions actually mean something.

Lance A. Birk
 
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PHRAG

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Mr. Birk,

I would like to welcome you to our forum. I do sincerely hope that you will continue to post in other topics. It would be a shame to hear from you only when there is a chance to defend your book.

I am not going to comment on much of the body of your response to this thread, as it seems that you and Stephen have a history that taints the argument at hand. I will ask you to refer to our rules about name calling. Calling someone ignorant, while rude, is acceptable. Ignorance is simply a lack of knowledge. But calling someone stupid is, in my opinion, childish and insulting.

I would like to ask you for clarification on one item in your response. Your text is as follows...

Lance Birk said:
I really don’t know if you are seeking revenge with me for sending you a courtesy notice regarding your copyright infringement issue concerning graphics from my book, but if you are, I would think you might be grateful that I chose not to prosecute you. But maybe not.
I am going to assume that Stephen used your photographs at some point in the past on his website, and that you asked for their removal. I understand that Stephen operates a non-profit, educational website. As anyone with even a basic understanding of copyright law can tell you, the use of copyrighted material in non-profit, educational materials is covered under the Fair Use clause of copyright law if certain conditions are met. This clause also allows for the use of copyrighted materials in certain for profit ventures as well. As someone who has used a large number of copyrighted photographs under the Fair Use clause, I would be more than happy to discuss this matter in more detail.

My main concern is with your statement that Stephen should be grateful to you for not being prosecuted for copyright infringement in a situation where you obviously have questionable legal grounds to sue him. Again, I am only assuming that this is the type of situation you are referring to. If I am wrong, please correct me.

At best, this type of behavior elevates you to the status of those individuals who threaten lawsuits with no legal merit knowing that the average person will remove the items in question rather than pay legal fees. If I am incorrect in my interpretation of your attitude regarding these matters, please educate me. Otherwise, my judgement of you will be limited to grouping you in with those contemporaries previously mentioned. I would hate for my first introduction to you to be clouded by such an opinion.

John McGarity
 

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