Cattleyas Awards (Cali Show, Colombia)

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DrLeslieEe

Scholar, Addict and Aficionado of Orchidacea
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Our team awarded these two beautiful cattleya species I thought ST cattleya fans might enjoy to see.

Cattleya trianae (var rosada) AM 83 points

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What’s special is that the flower open a white semialba and turns rosada (pinkish) after a few days. One spike was white and other matured spike pink!

Cattleya quadricolor (var flamea) AM 85 points

1AA4AA38-FC78-4EB6-9BB2-DDB46257877D.jpeg

Fantastic flamea eyes on the petals.
 
I wouldn’t have recognised the quadricolor as the species!
They’re both stunning but I think that I prefer the trianae.

Well it is not a quadricolor or a species for instance...

That's a hybrid of Cattleya Remo Prada.
 
The throat looks different to the Remo Prada's 'on line'?
That's why it is an hybrid of it, and it cannot be a pure quadricolor species.

It is the same if I show a Paphiopedilum Delrosi. If I ask which known species it is, it can be said to be a brand new pink rothschildianum or a gigantic striped delenatii, especially if everyone believe it was wild collected or the true, guaranteed, progeny of a wild collected plant.

The plague in the Cattleya started in the 80s when many Japanese hobbyists and nurseries paid a fortune for a new color form of variety. As a result, many ' new varieties' and even species were 'arranged'.

That's how we got amongst others ' Cattleya motae' , a Brassocattleya, but the Cattleya motae was so rare that it sold for thousands of dollars to Japan, and the list is very long. Cattleya motae was wild collected in the jungle, with all the perils, and only a few plants were ever found. Fantastic fairy tale.

Many color forms of Cattleya are as well hybrids, so are many if not most of the walkeriana and nobilior. Some Brazilian nurseries became expert in screening what looks too much hybrid, the same for Paphiopedilum godefroyae and leucochilum. It is very rare too that people buying a ' top quality rarity' self and flower the seedlings, so the risks are limited for Cattleya.

But for that quadricolor, the flower has nothing to do with the species, aside from the fact that it is a Remo Prada hybrid, typical for the color pattern as well. They were produced, and sold from Brazil as various new rare flare wild collected species of various species about 15-20 years ago.
 
The unfortunate part is that any species out there can claim this as well. Hard to prove unless genetically tested. So as far as we can do at this moment is to do the best guess with what we have. Everything else may be considered here say until solid evidence surmises.
 
The unfortunate part is that any species out there can claim this as well. Hard to prove unless genetically tested. So as far as we can do at this moment is to do the best guess with what we have. Everything else may be considered here say until solid evidence surmises.
"Out there"...do you mean in the wild? We have, of course, heard about the ploys with orchids of a hybridic origin, planted in the wild, and suddenly hailed as a new discovery. One would think, though, we were on a much safer footing with plants, described in their habitats by several (relative) reliable botanists over more than a century.

I wholeheartedly agree with Roth, when it comes to leuchos and godefroyae. I've given up on deciding whether a nice and/or well coloured one of them, are, what they are said to be. It seems, that (off-)line-breeding of these species have brought us to a point, where it's often impossible to determine whether what's at hand is a 100% genuine article, or one, that somewhere along the line got a little help from a friend. I now, in respect to these species, just go after flowers I like.
By the way, the godefroyae I've got, of whose identity, I'm, actually, most convinced, would never ever get anywhere near being awardable, due to the relatively small size of its flowers!
 
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