Cattleya trianae flamea, 'Cashen's', and 'Mooreana'

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
899
Reaction score
524
Location
Bloomington, MN
For the group of growers on this forum who love Cattleya alliance as well as slippers.

Cattleya trianae ‘Cashen’s’ was awarded an AOS FCC February 12, 2005 and is considered one of the best rubra trianae. The awarded plant had two flowers with a horizontal natural spread of 15.5 cm. The picture accompanying the award shows a small flamea pattern at the lateral edge of wide, full petals. This plant is commonly considered to be a tetraploid but I don’t know the strength of the evidence.

Orchids Limited did a self cross of ‘Cashen’s’ and many of the resulting plants were outstanding. My plant from the cross is a bit unique in having a prominent flamea pattern on the petals (see picture). The natural width of my flower has not gotten larger than 14.0 cm and I haven’t gotten more than two flowers. Maybe a larger, more mature plant will improve on these results.
flamea.jpeg
A flamea pattern (reddish, flame-like markings on petals) can be seen with various orchid genera. On December 9, 1987 Cattleya trianae ‘Mooreana’ was awarded an AOS AM. This plant had light pink petals with “unusual …. deep rich magenta splashes”. In subsequent years, the name Cattleya trianae var. mooreana started to be used to identify Cattleya trianae flowers with flamea patterns. Many of these can be found with a web search. This is probably not correct nomenclature. Only someone with a verified division of the original awarded Cattleya trianae ‘Mooreana’ should’ use name! The rest of us should probably just use flamea as a descriptor of the color form the way we might use the term coerulea or semi-alba.
 

DrLeslieEe

Scholar, Addict and Aficionado of Orchidacea
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
5,673
Reaction score
5,963
Location
TORONTO CANADA
Nice bloom. The flamea marking is quite strong and wide. A few windowing of the petals and sepal region. Is this first bloom?

You are correct in the labeling of the flamea or pincelada designations for the petal flaring.

I have both ‘Cashen’s’ and true ‘Mooreana’ divisions and neither are considered the rubra form, as the pink is normal typical lavender. Only the flamea portions are dark as rubra.

First pic is ‘Cashen’s’, second is ‘Mooreana’:

544CE56A-7B8B-426C-A6F8-4C923DF211A2.jpeg D4390265-63E7-4830-AEAF-969998242709.jpeg
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2018
Messages
1,082
Reaction score
706
Location
Spotsylvania, VA
T
For the group of growers on this forum who love Cattleya alliance as well as slippers.

Cattleya trianae ‘Cashen’s’ was awarded an AOS FCC February 12, 2005 and is considered one of the best rubra trianae. The awarded plant had two flowers with a horizontal natural spread of 15.5 cm. The picture accompanying the award shows a small flamea pattern at the lateral edge of wide, full petals. This plant is commonly considered to be a tetraploid but I don’t know the strength of the evidence.

Orchids Limited did a self cross of ‘Cashen’s’ and many of the resulting plants were outstanding. My plant from the cross is a bit unique in having a prominent flamea pattern on the petals (see picture). The natural width of my flower has not gotten larger than 14.0 cm and I haven’t gotten more than two flowers. Maybe a larger, more mature plant will improve on these results.
View attachment 22093
A flamea pattern (reddish, flame-like markings on petals) can be seen with various orchid genera. On December 9, 1987 Cattleya trianae ‘Mooreana’ was awarded an AOS AM. This plant had light pink petals with “unusual …. deep rich magenta splashes”. In subsequent years, the name Cattleya trianae var. mooreana started to be used to identify Cattleya trianae flowers with flamea patterns. Many of these can be found with a web search. This is probably not correct nomenclature. Only someone with a verified division of the original awarded Cattleya trianae ‘Mooreana’ should’ use name! The rest of us should probably just use flamea as a descriptor of the color form the way we might use the term coerulea or semi-alba.
Terry that is absolutely gorgeous! This is one I missed, shoot! I love flamea catts.
 
Joined
Nov 17, 2018
Messages
1,082
Reaction score
706
Location
Spotsylvania, VA
T

Terry that is absolutely gorgeous! This is one I missed, shoot! I love flamea catts. I have a question that will show a level of lack of expertise. If something is crossed with itself in a controlled environment, why would the flowers not be genetically identical and all look alike? Hmmm, I started to say sort of like identical twins, however, even identical twins have differences and they are thought to be genetically identical, so I think I just answered my own question. By the way, we have identical twins proven by genetic testing, however, they have some different genetic variants and look similar, but not the same. But that's for another discussion.
 
Joined
Nov 29, 2008
Messages
899
Reaction score
524
Location
Bloomington, MN
Deb, doing a selfing cross with a plant, you get full shuffling of the genes the plant has so you end up with diversity much greater than identical twins. Cloning the plant would give less variation and be like what you see with identical twins. There is still variation, but much less.
 

Tintin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
66
Reaction score
9
Hi All, I wonder if Cashen’s can do OK if overpotted "a little"?
 

Tintin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
66
Reaction score
9
Well I added a bunch of packing peanuts in the middle so there is a lot of air inside the pot. Hopefully the roots like styrofoam!
 

Latest posts

Top