Cattleya trianaei

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terryros

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I think that was Southernbelle. My rate was lower. We each tested our whole collections. I think the issue is predominantly with older, mature plants that we acquire, mostly as divisions. I had no virus in any species or primary hybrids that I had acquired as seedlings. Done correctly, new seedling crosses, even made with virused parents, should be free. Mericlones can be infected when made the usual way. Since I am mostly interested in species and primary hybrids, I am still good to go with Cattleyas. None of my Paphs, Phrags, or Miltoniopsis were virus positive. It is possible for those to become infected, but for some reason the rate seems to be much lower.
 

southernbelle

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Thanks for clarified, good to know, years ago when I just started collecting orchids, I bought a few dozens of cattleya/laelia divisions, this orchid company actually sent me some virus plants with extreme signs in pseudobulb & leaves (but with no experience/knowledge , I did not suspect anything) , until the flowers blooms , my Gods , terrible color breaks .
I haven't owned one single cattleya nor laelia since .
Hein, no need to give up on them. Of my 60 cattleyas 28% were virused and destroyed. Although I thought I knew how to keep tools, etc. clean from growing roses, I was not careful enough over my first 4 years of growing and undoubtedly spread some of this myself (a couple of seedlings were positive, so knowing the hybridizer uses the dry method for harvesting the seeds, these would have been cross contaminated by me). Thankfully only one or two of my favorite plants had to be destroyed and, fortunately I was able to replace those cultivars with virus free ones.
I now test everything that comes in. Even the most reputable growers (known for their clean stock) cannot test every plant and sometimes ship a virused plant unknowingly. I’ve found them very cooperative in replacing with a clean plant, should one slip through. The ones that slip through are those showing no signs on foliage or flowers yet. In some cases growers will test an order for you prior to shipping and only charge for the cost of the test.
So far, all my Paphs and phrags have been clean, but the phals have a pretty high percentage of virus. I had 3 Sogo Vivian Marginata and all 3 were positive!
I only grow 3 phals now, less than 10 phrags, so all the rest are catts and paphs. I just love the Catt hybrids too much, so to me it’s worth it.
 

southernbelle

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I think that was Southernbelle. My rate was lower. We each tested our whole collections. I think the issue is predominantly with older, mature plants that we acquire, mostly as divisions. I had no virus in any species or primary hybrids that I had acquired as seedlings. Done correctly, new seedling crosses, even made with virused parents, should be free. Mericlones can be infected when made the usual way. Since I am mostly interested in species and primary hybrids, I am still good to go with Cattleyas. None of my Paphs, Phrags, or Miltoniopsis were virus positive. It is possible for those to become infected, but for some reason the rate seems to be much lower.
No cloning in Paphs and phrags is one reason they tend to stay clean. Of course cross- contamination from bad orchid hygiene could spread it to them, though.
 

dodidoki

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Reflecting to all of you I destroyed my catt collection about down to 30 percent, i kept only plants what show no any sign of infection and bloomed normally on past year.Result is here: garbage and survivers:
 

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DrLeslieEe

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Oh what a tragic death scene :oops: of catts.... very sad...

At least the GH is so well organized now... what are the two plants wayyyyyy up high in the rafters by the roof?
 

southernbelle

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Oh my! I really hate it that you did that without testing, because good looking plants can be virused and sick looking ones can not be. Oh well...
 

Hien

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Reflecting to all of you I destroyed my catt collection about down to 30 percent, i kept only plants what show no any sign of infection and bloomed normally on past year.Result is here: garbage and survivers:
I am not sure all of the ones you throw out in that heap are infected? some of them seem to look better than the many plants sold at shows. Did all of those give any indication at their most recent flowerings?
 

dodidoki

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I am not sure all of the ones you throw out in that heap are infected? some of them seem to look better than the many plants sold at shows. Did all of those give any indication at their most recent flowerings?
I keep just rarities and what has flowered before normally.I ended with catts otherwise.
 

dodidoki

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Oh what a tragic death scene :oops: of catts.... very sad...

At least the GH is so well organized now... what are the two plants wayyyyyy up high in the rafters by the roof?
They are one sincorana and one sincorana blue form.
 

PeteM

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It's difficult to clear bench space. Nobody wants to sell, give away an orchid to a new or seasoned grower that is difficult to bloom, or showing signs of disease. Personally, I have found local plant groups online through facebook groups which sell and trade mainly houseplants and aroids. I have been able to post orchids for sale that I want to rotate out of my collection (first bloom seedlings that are not up to par). Usually when I have one or two in bloom that I want to rotate out, I group a few out of bloom orchids in with the lot, or add a few free plants the buyer might be interested in. I have also put groups of orchids up for auction on facebook, not a lot of money but mainly finding good homes and helping me 'cull the herd'. This provides a new hobby for some of the plant lovers who have never tried an orchid and are trying new hobbies with COVID.. I try to focus on orchids that another would have success blooming. I do feel awful tossing plants, just wanted to put that out there as another option for others in the same boat.
 

tomp

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I find the percentage of virus much higher in the older classics and much lower in the new lines. Specifically in dry seed prop, and in the ever expanding miniature Cattleya breeding.
 
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