Cattleya amethystoglossa

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jokerpass

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This is a difficult species for me to bloom. It produced a blind sheath almost every year; however, this year it produced a sheath that actually produced blooms. I believe this species normally blooms in March/April. The last time it bloomed was 2 seasons ago, bloomed in March/April. The flowers came out from a mature growth with a dried sheath. This year, once the growth finished growing in the fall (Oct), I immediately saw the flower buds developing inside a fresh (red) sheath and it is blooming now, started blooming in early January. Maybe someone here with more experience with this species may provide some tips on how to consistently bloom this particular Cattleya species .
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Guldal

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This species is a fave of mine. I grow a couple on my window sill. They seem to be in good growth, but as they are relative new to my collection, I haven't seen them in flower, yet.
Maybe someone here with more experience with this species may provide some tips on how to consistently bloom this particular Cattleya species .
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I too certainly would be happy to hear the answer to that question - especially in respect to light and temperature.?
 

jokerpass

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This species is a fave of mine. I grow a couple on my window sill. They seem to be in good growth, but as they are relative new to my collection, I haven't seen them in flower, yet.

I too certainly would be happy to hear the answer to that question - especially in respect to light and temperature.?
I really do not know....this is what I'm trying to find out from someone who knows about this species :)
 

jokerpass

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Gorgeous flowers! I haven't seen this one in a very long time and such an excellent example of the species.
Yes, it is a nice one. The flower colour changes as the flower matures :) quite interesting, When it first opens, it is more fusia and as it matures, it turns more pale.
 

dodidoki

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Very nice color and shape..Looks like a coerulea to me.
 
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This is a difficult species for me to bloom. It produced a blind sheath almost every year; however, this year it produced a sheath that actually produced blooms. I believe this species normally blooms in March/April. The last time it bloomed was 2 seasons ago, bloomed in March/April. The flowers came out from a mature growth with a dried sheath. This year, once the growth finished growing in the fall (Oct), I immediately saw the flower buds developing inside a fresh (red) sheath and it is blooming now, started blooming in early January. Maybe someone here with more experience with this species may provide some tips on how to consistently bloom this particular Cattleya species .
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I didn’t have any luck with this species but my plant was virused so I discarded it after 2 years.
 

DrLeslieEe

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This species grows high on trees above water in the Amazon so requires bright cattleya light esp over the summer when the new growths are growing. Feed well during this time. The growths may rest for a few months to bloom or bloom right away over fall to spring. They can grow up to 3 feet tall with 3 to 30 flowers!!

After flowering there is a slight rest before new growths start (1-3 months) where they should water a little less. Keep warm throughout year.
 
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This is a difficult species for me to bloom. It produced a blind sheath almost every year; however, this year it produced a sheath that actually produced blooms. I believe this species normally blooms in March/April. The last time it bloomed was 2 seasons ago, bloomed in March/April. The flowers came out from a mature growth with a dried sheath. This year, once the growth finished growing in the fall (Oct), I immediately saw the flower buds developing inside a fresh (red) sheath and it is blooming now, started blooming in early January. Maybe someone here with more experience with this species may provide some tips on how to consistently bloom this particular Cattleya species .
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It’s so pretty. What a lip.
 
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I have always thought that the number one reason a cattleya does not bloom is due to a lack of strong enough light. Assuming that the pant is old enough.
I agree with Dr. Ee, these plants get to be monsters, really huge plants!!! There is a hobby grower in Englewood Florida who puts a couple specimens in his club's display every March. (keep in my mind that March in Florida is not quite the same as March in a northern climate) The flowers on those two specimens were around 15-20, massive pseudobulbs, at least 3 very thick, kind of course, rough to the touch leathery leaves on top of 28-36' bulbs. These plants were clearly not young plants. They were grown in rather large clay tubs. I can't imagine how much each pot weighed!
Cattleya tigrina and guttata grow the same way.
 
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dodidoki

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I don t know if it is true or not, but I red in a book about 2 leaves catt sp.,that amethystoglossa was thought to be extincted from nature few decades ago. Many of new populations , living in forests, are recultivated indeed. It was a great, succesfull sp. saving action, fortunately.Amazing species.
 

dodidoki

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Flowers or no flowers this is always a question of light intensity ! It is true for all orchids !
This is my biggest problem here, in Hungary....cactis dry out in sunlight in summer, but there is just a little light, in winter, electricity bills are in the heaven, all I build up from spring to fall, break down in winter.
 
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I have always found these large bifoliate species amongst the most difficult orchids to grow. You can generally give them enough light for them to bloom but to get them enough light to reach their maximum potential is some times difficult!
I have had amethystoglossa bloom as a fairly small seedling in either a three inch or 4” pot.
It takes them a few years to reach maturity. The problem arises in repotting them. Their roots are very easily damaged there by setting the plant back for a year or two. I have had bifoliate Cattleyas die on me a year or two after repotting. They just kept going downhill.

I find them to be amongst our most beautiful species in the Orchid World.
 

geoffsharris

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These will take as much light as you can give them. I had a summer power outage a few years ago and greenhouse got to 120F. My amethestoglossas were right near the roof. Leaves were moderate damaged, but survived. Other species like Lueddemaniana and several vandas that will take a lot of light got vaporized. Not that hard to grow if intermediate to warm in winter, warm in summer and very bright. Not happening under most lights or indoors. I have 6-7 clones that bloom Feb-Mar. under my conditions.
 

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