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gore42

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In the 1988 American Orchid Society Bulletin, the article entitled "A procedure for asexual multiplication of Paphiopedilums in vitro" by L.C. Huang

(Issue 57, pp. 274-278)

Thanks!

Matt
 
L

lienluu

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gore42 said:
In the 1988 American Orchid Society Bulletin, the article entitled "A procedure for asexual multiplication of Paphiopedilums in vitro" by L.C. Huang

(Issue 57, pp. 274-278)

Thanks!

Matt
Yes
 
E

Eric Muehlbauer

Guest
I have it also....I always wondered about what happened with that research...Take care, Eric
 
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gore42

Guest
I'm thinking about trying a technique developed in Taiwan, published in 2001, based on this work. I don't know if I have the skills yet, though :)

- Matt
 

gonewild

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gore42 said:
I'm thinking about trying a technique developed in Taiwan, published in 2001, based on this work. I don't know if I have the skills yet, though :)

- Matt
Blasphemy! Tissue cultured slippers will be the end of the world! :mad:
:poke:
 

Jon in SW Ohio

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I have that issue but haven't tried digging it out. Is this the one that spoke of tissue culturing sections of the ovary? I have also heard of delenatii "tissue culturing" itself while in flask.

Jon
 
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gore42

Guest
Lance,

Before you get worked up, the method I'm talking about isn't like mericloning. I believe that this method is the same that Jon is talking about, that the folks at OL did with delenatii.

As I understand it, this is basically a way to induce seedlings in flask to produce new growths and roots and then can be divided, so that more seedlings can be produced from a limited amount of viable seed. This isn't like stem propagation where you're going to produce thousands of genetically identical plants.

At least, thats not my aim. There are some Paph species that don't produce a lot of good seed, and it would be a big help to be able to make that seed go as far as I can.

- Matt
 
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Bob Wellenstein

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Proliferating Paph protocorms is not difficult, but may also be quite unwise based on some of the results I've seen flower. Why does everyone want to run before they learn to walk?
 
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gore42

Guest
OK, before anyone else gets worked up about this, look up the article:

Scientia Horticulturae 91 (2001) 111-121. Article is called "Paphiopedilum cloning in vitro", also by Huang, et al.

First of all, this method involves the use of seedlings (2 cm shoots), not protocorns.

Second, and more importantly, I'm just doing research. This is not running before I'm walking. This isn't even crawling. It's just thinking about it. Settle down.

- Matthew Gore
 

gonewild

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gore42 said:
Lance,

Before you get worked up, the method I'm talking about isn't like mericloning. I believe that this method is the same that Jon is talking about, that the folks at OL did with delenatii.

As I understand it, this is basically a way to induce seedlings in flask to produce new growths and roots and then can be divided, so that more seedlings can be produced from a limited amount of viable seed. This isn't like stem propagation where you're going to produce thousands of genetically identical plants.

At least, thats not my aim. There are some Paph species that don't produce a lot of good seed, and it would be a big help to be able to make that seed go as far as I can.

- Matt
Matt,

I'm not getting worked up! That's why I used the variation of smilies.
I don't mean to imply you should not experiment but I do suggest one should think of the consequences of the results.

I understand exactly what you would like to accomplish and why. I just hate to see the slippers fall the way of phals and other cloned orchids. It is something special to have a unique clone that does not exist in every collection. It is also nice to not be able to find every specie the moment you want it. (believe it or not)

I am familiar with the technique you refer to that will divide in-vitro seedlings.
Although it may be a faster way to increase plant material from species that produce few seed it could also be a conduit for perpetuating unproductive genes.

There also arises a problem of how to label the offspring. Suppose you produce 10 clonal seedlings from a single Paph. Suppose you sell them to 10 different persons. Suppose the first to bloom receives an FCC. What of the other 9 seedlings? Do they also have the award? If so the prestige and value of owning that clone is minimized. It could become quite confusing as well.

I would bet Peruflora can tell you how to do the process for Phrags, at least for kovachii.

My comment was offered from a collectors perspective. From a commercial perspective I would offer a different opinion. I understand both. I did not intend to criticize what you are trying to do.

I'm curious what other forum members think of cloning seedlings in-vitro?
 

littlefrog

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A lot of phrags proliferate in flask. I could have made a million flasks from maybe 10 flasks of Hanne Popow I was working on. That was ... 15 years or so ago.

Hermann Pigors gave me an article on mericloning phrags (I believe Sedenii 'Blush') that was published in Die Orchideen, he was able to make it work in his laboratory I believe (again, 10 or 15 years ago).

Either George Jr. or Carl Hausermann had some small success stem propping paphs at one point (EFG Orchids).

That is just some of the anecdotes I can share about slipper cloning... I was very interested in it at one point. I think at the time I was looking into it, it was modestly possible. The main limitations were in destroying a growing point on a normally relatively slow growing adult plant (with no small chance of killing the stock plant), this made it a hard sell, obviously. Also, it is evidently very difficult to get explants free of contamination for some reason that was never adequately explained, possibly bacteria can colonize even internally in paphiopedilum (seems far fetched...). If that isn't bad enough, even clean explants have a very poor success rate. So, risk of killing your good plant, poor success rate, costs... Didn't seem commercially viable. Add in the culture of Paph and phrag growers, where we expect to be limited to natural divisions of stud plants, and it is an even harder sell.
 
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gore42

Guest
Lance,

I didn't mean to suggest that you really were worked up; the reply to your post was intended to be in good humor... and in fact, I agree with you completely. :) I would hate to see tons of clones of any Paph, and I would never mass produce Paph clones the way that it has been done with Phals and Oncidinae and Catts, etc... At least not without a very very good reason. Mass production of clones does a terrible disservice to the gene pool of a species.

My interest in the technique goes as far as producing enough seedlings of a species that is difficult to propagate to ease the demand for wild collected plants. Done in the way suggested by the article, dozens of different clones would be produced, though... not just hundreds of the same clone.

And, let me stress again, I am only researching the topic, I'm a long way from implementing such a thing. I don't know yet whether I can or would want to actually do it.

- Matthew Gore
 

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