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Question on resting period

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Gcroz

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I had a debate with another grower and would like to see what others think. I won't say who the grower is or what his argument was. Birk's Manual states that the Parvi species like to have rest periods, generally in December. Now, I stated that in my opinion it meant not to water for a week or two, ie letting them dry out but not become dessicated. I've heard that some people recommend a month of no water, but that scares me.

What does everyone else have to say?
 
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Elena

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I don't know about parvi species but I left my BS multis without water for about 4-6 weeks in the unheated spare bedroom this winter :sob: I didn't even mean to leave them for so long, it just kind of worked out that way but they were fine and two out of 4 spiked, I suspect the third one might be spiking too and the 4th one was a Delrosi which now has a new home :poke:
 

NYEric

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I don't know about parvi species but I left my BS multis without water for about 4-6 weeks in the unheated spare bedroom this winter :sob: I didn't even mean to leave them for so long, it just kind of worked out that way ..
See I can't do that; I usually sleep in the same room as my plants. :)
 
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Elena

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The master bedroom is the one room that's kept completely orchid free. For now :D
 

Rick

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Depending on your potting mix. You could skip watering for a few weeks with reduced temps (max of 65 say) and air not too dry (50% min). Light daily misting would also be advisable.
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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A lot depends on humidity....a greenhouse grower could probably let them go 2-3 weeks without watering if they have a really humid situation. I keep my parvi's in a cold room, but its also my family room...TV, couch, and also my reef tanks. I water them once a week during the winter, no fertilizer. In summer, they get watered a few times a week (outdoors) with weekly fertilizer. Not that this routine brings me lots of buds.........Take care, Eric
 

Gcroz

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Good, I'm glad to see I wasn't far off. Birk is not very specific on the matter, but funny enough I learned the resting trick from someone here long before I knew about this forum. I'm glad I remembered the advice, although you would have thought I would try and follow it. LOL.
 

Ray

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Going back to Candace's semi-hydro reference for a moment, folks who do allow their plants to "rest" do so in one of two general ways - they either cut back on the watering, or water normally, but withhold all fertilizer.

The latter apparently works just fine for nobile dens and others, so maybe that is translatable to parvi's in traditional media, as well.
 

Lance Birk

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Different species require different rest periods, and it can vary widely with where they are grown while in cultivation.

In general, a rest period is a period of time, usually from one to two months in length, where the plant receives both a drop in night temps in the winter, of about 20°, from summer nighttime lows, and an almost complete withholding of water.

Both parvi and brachy groups have plants with thickened leaves and thick roots that are able to store large quantities of moisture, and they go through this rest unaffected. Humidity levels above 50% are helpful at this time, but not exactly necessary in all cases.

If your growing area has extremely low humidity, and nighttime temps remain above 50°, with daytime temps in the 80s, and you have a strong, drying fan blowing on your plants, then perhaps you would need to add supplemental irrigation. But, then this is not quite the temp drop required for most paphs. Rather than daily misting, I would recommend in-pot water at bi-weekly intervals.

Do not be afraid to withhold irrigation for weeks at a time, in many situations. And get the nighttime temps into the high 40s or low 50s depending on summer lows. A rest means "REST."

Species that come from lowland areas near the Equator have different resting requirements (which can become different when under cultivation), and their rest period might only last for 3-4 weeks.

There are two reason plants fail to bloom: they either do not get enough light, or, they do not have a sufficient rest period.
 

Candace

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Going back to Candace's semi-hydro reference for a moment, folks who do allow their plants to "rest" do so in one of two general ways - they either cut back on the watering, or water normally, but withhold all fertilizer.
True, Ray. I do cut back on fertilizer in the winter...but I still do fertilize some so there are no absolutes.

To say they "need a dry rest"....well, I think most people water less in the winter due to the dreary weather and we don't enjoy getting splashed with water in the freezing cold. I think a semi-rest or rest happens naturally along with our own schedules and needs. I don't necessarily think we need to concentrate on letting our paphs go without water for a month. I'll keep growing in s/h and keep watering throughout the winter as I have for the last 11 years;>

Gcroz, you will find if you're looking for someone to support a certain growing technique, sure enough there will be someone on the internet that will...The truth is you should follow the advice of the best growers in your area.
 

Gcroz

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Lance Birk-

Thank you for taking a moment to comment on this thread. I hope that you didn't take any offence to anything I said, I greatly admire your work and many of your opinions. It is truly exciting that you have offered us your opinions on this matter.

My intention wasn't to try to find people to side with my opinion, but merely trying to discover if there was any concensus as to resting periods. I realize I can find people who agree with me on any subject as they are a Google click away, but finding a "best practices" position can elusive. If I didn't state that, then I apologize for any confusion

Perhaps being a lawyer by education and former profession makes me look to hard for "rules" to follow.
 
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Bolero

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I've been letting mine dry out a lot when coming into winter. It seems to promote a flower spike on some plants but not others. Not that i'm the expert of course.

But mine are very dry right now (yes it's almost winter here) but I never let them stay dry for a whole month........2 weeks would be the longest period and that's only for the larger plants i have. The smallest plants would get watered weekly. Haven't lost one yet due to being to dry.
 

Candace

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but finding a "best practices" position can elusive
You will find many different best practices, but is it your best practice?? Growers opinions who live in your immediate area should always carry more weight than anyone else's. What works for someone halfway across the country may not work for you. If you believe cutting off the water in the winter will work for you, give it a go. I'm sure the plants will survive. The real question is will they thrive and be better off than those who don't go through a total rest?
 

Lance Birk

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Gcroz,

No sweat, I don't take offense easily. Your concerns are valid. My post was to help you understand how variable the location, the environment and the different species can really be.

Most all orchids are as hardy as nails. I've carried many paph species around in the jungle for over a month before getting them home and potted up. Sometimes the plants are limp as a dishrag, but within days they look as though they're back in habitat.

I never lost any orchid from too much rest. (I have lost many from too much water.) Your best action is to observe your plants. Those that are shy to bloom should be given more light, or a longer and more pronounced rest.

Good luck.
 

NYEric

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Most all orchids are as hardy as nails. I've carried many paph species around in the jungle for over a month before getting them home and potted up. Sometimes the plants are limp as a dishrag, but within days they look as though they're back in habitat.
I'm wondering if I'm the only one feeling jealous about this statement! :eek:
 
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Greenpaph

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I also give the long rest. However, I still keep the humidity level during the winter months. I believe that this is the key!
 
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