Phrag. Robert C Silich

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D

Drorchid

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Hi Guys,

One of our Phrag. Robert C Silich's (Jason Fischer x Mem. Dick Clements) is in bloom. I think this one is the best out of the batch so I took a picture of it, and posted it for you to enjoy:



Here is a close up of the pouch:



It is interesting that the inside rim of the pouch is first white to cream in color and changes to bright yellow after a few days (the flower in the background which is older has a darker yellow rim).

Robert
 
G

Grandma M

Guest
I love the pouch. Does the yellow ridge on the pouch turn white after it is open a while?
 
D

Drorchid

Guest
Grandma M said:
I love the pouch. Does the yellow ridge on the pouch turn white after it is open a while?
No, it does it the other way round; if first opens up with a white rim and staminode, that later turns bright yellow in color!

Robert
 

ScottMcC

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:drool: :drool: :drool: Rob, you continue to outdo yourself!

I don't suppose you have any of these for sale yet, do you?

oh and by the way, I'm still waiting on those pink panthers you said would be ready this summer. ;)

edit: let me get this straight. robert c silich = Jason Fischer x Memoria Dick Clements, which means (besseae x MDC) x (besseae x sargenteanum), which means (besseae x (besseae x sargenteanum)) x (besseae x sargenteanum), and that's where I stop being able to do math about what percentage is besseae vs sargenteanum, but it's about 80% besseae. whatever the exact number, it's a winner in my book! great hybrid!
 
D

Drorchid

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ScottMcC said:
:drool: :drool: :drool: Rob, you continue to outdo yourself!


I don't suppose you have any of these for sale yet, do you?

oh and by the way, I'm still waiting on those pink panthers you said would be ready this summer. ;)

edit: let me get this straight. robert c silich = Jason Fischer x Memoria Dick Clements, which means (besseae x MDC) x (besseae x sargenteanum), which means (besseae x (besseae x sargenteanum)) x (besseae x sargenteanum), and that's where I stop being able to do math about what percentage is besseae vs sargenteanum, but it's about 80% besseae. whatever the exact number, it's a winner in my book! great hybrid!
Thanks!

In regard to these being for sale; I only got a few out of this cross (partly because I only made a few as I wanted to see what it would like like before I would make large numbers), so we don't have any left for sale that I know.


In regard to the Pink Panther's the first baby seedlings have been planted out, so they should be close.......(and there are more on the way). We also have a cross made with Pink Panther coming (I crossed Phrag Pink Panther on to a besseae) so those should be interesting as well.

in regard to % besseae in Robert C Silich: Phrag Jason Fischer is 75 % besseae and Mem Dick Clements is 50% besseae. This means that Robert C. SIlich is (75 + 50)/2 = 62.5 % besseae and 37.5% sargentianum

I have already backcrossed Robert C Silich to besseae which will give you 81.25 % besseae and 18.75 % sargentianum!

With these kind of crosses you will find more variation within the population than if you would compare it to a primary cross.

Robert
 

Heather

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Ok. I really do like these, and I love the fact that the color darkens over a few days in the pouch.

But, um, honestly....I'm going to play devil's advocate here - what are you trying to achieve by this breeding? Is it really that different from other crosses involving the same, or very similar parents?

:)
Thanks!
 
B

Bolero

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That colour would be just about impossible to beat. So deep and vibrant and the shape of the flower is also impressive.

That's a real winner.
 
D

Drorchid

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Heather said:
But, um, honestly....I'm going to play devil's advocate here - what are you trying to achieve by this breeding? Is it really that different from other crosses involving the same, or very similar parents?

:)
Thanks!
Hi Heather!

There are a number of reasons why I made the cross:

1) Plain curiosity
2) I was hoping to combine the good characteristics of both parents and get something that was better than either parent. Phrag. M. D. Clements tends to get more flowers per flower spike than Phrag Jason Fischer, But Phrag Jason Fischer tends to get larger, better shaped flowers, So I was hoping some plants of this cross would have more flowers per spike compared to Phrag Jason Fischer, but yet be larger and better shaped compared to Phrag. M. D. Clements
3) like I said earlier when you do these kind of back crosses you get more variation within a population, and as a breeder you want more variation, because the chance of selecting something better and more interesting will increase that way
4) Also there is a known plant breeding technique of backcrossing back and forth to either parent: A x B = F1; F1 x A = F2 ; F2 x B = F3; F3 x A = F4 etc etc (F = generation; A = species A; B = species B) you keep selecting the most vigorous plants and the ones that breed the best. After a number of generations you end up with very vigorous plants that you can easily breed back and forth with; so we breeders often backcross to one of the parents. Look at Phrag Jason Fischer; If Jerry had not thought of backcrossing Phrag. M. D. Clements back to one of it' s parents (Phrag. besseae) we would never have had Phrag. Jason Fischer!

I hope this answered some of your questions.

Robert
 

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