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Paph vs Phrag, growing is there a big difference?

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Garrie

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Im sure this is not as easy to answer as it seems but with out writing a book, if I may ask such a question: What is the most noticable or noteworthy difference (if there is 1) between the growing of Paphs vs Prags? Are they very different in terms of care? are they very different in terms of difficulty to bloom (or ease), I know a little about Paph culture but nothing about Phrags. garrie@cox.net
 

smartie2000

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Well there are some differences in cultural requirements. The main difference is that Phrags require more water. They are also more sensitive to fertilizer. When they are dried out or fertilized heavily they get brown leaf tips. Some poeple sit them in shallow water to keep them constantly wet. They can also take a little more sun than paphs.

....ummm we could write a book. There are also many anatomical differences and similarities which other members could probably describe better than me. Paphs are found in asia and Phrags are found in south america, and they do not usually hybridize together (a few paph x phrag hybrids have been registered but there are doubtful people). Phrags also send out multiple flowers, depending on the species, they will bloom all at once or squentially. Paphs can be unifloral or multifloral depending on its species. Phrag leaves are always green and strap shaped. They tend to be larger plants than paphs in general.

Phrags also grow much faster rate! They grow roots and leaves like weeds. Some specimen sized plants are always in bloom. Their individual blooms don't last as long as paphs, but they send out many blooms to compensate. I definitely recomend getting one since they are not difficult plants and impossible to overwater. They will grow well under your conditions and green house.
 

smartie2000

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I was going to email this but heres a link to a pdf file with phag info that was printed by the American Orchid Society. It might be useful http://www.zephyrusorchids.com/orchids.pdf

Remember H2O is the way to go for phrags....:p They're like bog plants of the rain forest. Phrag caudatum types(Caudatum, wallisii, and warscewiczianum) require only slightly drier conditions

edit: Is there something wrong with my computer? I noticed page 779 and 780 seem to be missing from the file in the link. I do have the full file on my stored on my computer because page 780 has cultural info
 
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Rick

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Smartie has the basics down.

Water amount and quality is the biggest issue. The epiphytic species (ie caudatum group, and boisieranum group) are not bog plants and shouldn't have constantly wet feet. But mine did good if they were kept in an open basket set in shallow water tray.

I've also found that my phrags do better in cooler breezier places in my greenhouse, but still with fairly bright light.
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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As everyone said, phrags need much more water than paphs. They are also much more tolerant of media...in terms of type, state of decomposition...I personally think they will grow in anything. I prefer bark mixes, others coconut husk, still others semi-hydroponic....doesn't matter...most phrag hybrids , and many species, will thrive no matter what....and as long as they are wet, they can be thouroughly neglected for years and still be healthy. Paphs are are not quite as easy, and what works for one person doesn't always work for another...but there is more variety among paphs, therefore more variety in growing conditions. As a beginner, I'd suggest starting with phrags...then trying a few paphs..Take care, Eric
 

NYEric

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Yes, something's wrong with your computer. I don't think Phrags are any easier to grow than Paph's. One thing I find is that yes, Phrags can grow like weeds. While there are some huge leaf Paphs, Some Phrags has real spce issues. I Also like Paphs because some, Parvis and Brachys, have cool leaf tasselations and the designs are cool even when the plant isn't in bloom. I mostly grow more Phrags, 100+ besseaes/crosses, because I overwater and they like water.
 

terrestrial_man

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Garrie,
The basic issue that has been repeated over the replies to your thread is that the difference between paphs and phrags is:
1. paphs like it drier
2. paphs are not large plants like phrags with exception for the multiflorals
3. paphs are epiphytic occurring in leaf litter, in rocky places, low moss covered branches and generally in shaded places. Phrags occur in more exposed situations often in areas where there is a constant movement of water through the debris they occur in or even in temporary streamlets from the tropical rains.
4. Phrags are easier to grow!!! And can make nice looking specimen plants in short order! Paphs are harder as the best I ever did with them was in a cow trough with a flourescent light set up-for easy paphs try P. insigne a cool grower that would do well for you outside in shade.
 

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