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OZ cross diploid, triploid, or tetraploid ???

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John D.

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Phrag besseae "Chilipepper" X Phrag besseae "Colossal" Z6753

Does anyone know the ploidy of the parents??
Dean any ideas?

Thanks
John
 
C

Corbin

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I am going to show my ignorance again and ask what is the difference and what difference does it make?
 

rdlsreno

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I am going to show my ignorance again and ask what is the difference and what difference does it make?
2n means its a diploid (normal count) 4n is a tetraploid (double the normal count) Usually the 4n are bigger and rounder since there are double number/size of the cells.


Ramon:)
 
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Corbin

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2n means its a diploid (normal count) 4n is a tetraploid (double the normal count) Usually the 4n are bigger and rounder since there are double number/size of the cells.


Ramon:)
count of what?
 

SlipperKing

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2n means its a diploid (normal count) 4n is a tetraploid (double the normal count) Usually the 4n are bigger and rounder since there are double number/size of the cells.


Ramon:)
Actually, it's the doubling of the chromosomes. which makes bigger flowers, stronger colors, thicker leaves but it also can have draw backs too. Sometimes the plants grow extremely slow ( at least excited people that can't wait for flowers think so!). Deformed plants, flowers can also occur.

Then if you cross a 2n with a 4n you get 3n's which most of the time are sterile
 

rdlsreno

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Thats right. it is the chromosomes. Ploidy is the set of homologous copies of chromosomes from both parents (mother and father) this is a 2n. In 4n this is doubled.

Ramon:)
 
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John D.

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Thanks for the info Paphioland, Ramon and Dean, was hoping it is either a 2n or 4n.
 
C

charlie c

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Aren't all plants 2n. :confused:
In higher forms of life, virtually all animals and most plants are diploid But in some plants there may be three (triploid, e.g. Cavendish banana), four (tetraploid, e.g. potato), six (hexaploid, e.g. bread wheat), or eight (octaploid, e.g. strawberry)

Even in orchids, Miltonia spectabilis v. moreliana is a naturally occurring tetraploid.

I think, John D. was hoping for 2N or 4n because most 3n plants are sterile.

charlie c
 
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Mrs. Paph

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The more you look at things like ploidy level, the more wierd things you find out in plants - do a quick search of ploidy level in sugarcane, that tends to be a common example of ploidy level series in plants - or check out roses, including meiosis in dogroses, that is probably the oddest example I can think of for 'chromosome craziness' haha, but interesting too, even more so after hearing and speaking w/ Nybom, she's very passionate about her canina. Examples like these aren't the norm, but I've seen estimates that around half of all flowering plant species are polyploid, so it makes for interesting things whether by natural occurance or as a result of breeding.
 
C

Corbin

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This has been a good thread and I have learned a lot. Thanks to all.:)
 
E

Eric Muehlbauer

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Ploidy variations have even led to speciation...I believe that Rhododendron cumberlandense (aka bakeri) is diploid, and R. calendulaceum is tetraploid...possibly the only differences between the species...(I have both...the diploid has smaller leaves and flowers...) Take care, Eric
 

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