Compare Clones, callosum,acmodontum and pearcei complex

Discussion in 'Taxonomy' started by SlipperKing, May 27, 2016.

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  1. May 27, 2016 #1

    SlipperKing

    SlipperKing

    SlipperKing

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    I've posted the vinicolored callosum already but here it is stacked up against a standard Thai callosum and a sibling plant not quite open yet

    [​IMG]

    This PIC came out pretty cool so I thought you all might like to see the "halo" in the callosum dorsal.

    [​IMG]

    My three acmodontums all blooming. All of the same cross.

    [​IMG]

    Here is the newest one opened

    [​IMG]

    Now the leaves of all three plants

    [​IMG]

    Moving on to the green Phrags.
    First is my awarded pearcei 'Little Angel'

    [​IMG]

    ecuadorense from a fellow STer

    [​IMG]

    And lastly, my awarded richteri 'Crooked Creek'

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    Now all three together.
    I personally don't see how someone could confuse richteri with either one of the others. I could be in possession of three of the most extreme examples and be way off.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. May 27, 2016 #2

    abax

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    Interesting comparison, but I'm not knowledgable enough
    about green Phrags. to see small differences. I do see
    some large differences however...I think.
     
  3. May 27, 2016 #3

    Bjorn

    Bjorn

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    The flowers seem very similar, so looking at flower pictures one may wonder whether or not its the same species. However, seeing the size-comparison in the last picture its easier to accept that they could be different species. I have an equadorense myself and it is indeed a tiny plant. Guess the yellowing leaves in the last picture belongs to that one, right Rick?
    Judging by size alone is not a good indicator for species though;). I have myself similar size-differences between flowering Eumelia Arias so one obviously hve to be careful here.:eek:
     
  4. May 27, 2016 #4

    JeanLux

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    Great growing Rick, bravo !!!! Jean
     
  5. May 27, 2016 #5

    SlipperKing

    SlipperKing

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    Thanks Jean. That's right Bjorn. It has heavy turnover of leaves but it grows excessively fast too. I can't figure out how to slow the leaf loss. Its in S/H, weak N (10-20 ppm) and not every watering. Maybe this species/variety needs higher nitrogen levels. It has a massive root system as seen through the plastic container. Its also one of the few Phrags that gets leaf tip burn which would say there's too much salt present. Any ideas?

    Sent from my SGH-T999 using Tapatalk
     
  6. May 27, 2016 #6

    Justin

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    Great show
     
  7. May 27, 2016 #7

    NYEric

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    :rollhappy:
    Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. May 27, 2016 #8

    Bjorn

    Bjorn

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    Not really, mine tend to have a bit of the same, perhaps not as much, my N fertilisation lies around 15-20ppm but in all water. I do not see any leaf tip burn though, touch wood;)
    More N could be something, what about ammonium/nitrate ratio? Mine is close to 2/1.
     
  9. May 27, 2016 #9

    SlipperKing

    SlipperKing

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    My ratio is flipped I bet
     
  10. May 27, 2016 #10

    Gilda

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    WOW !!! stunning comparisons !:clap: I'll leave the scientific jargon to the rest of you:p Love them all !
     
  11. May 28, 2016 #11

    SlipperFan

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    Cool photos. I'm waiting for geneticists to sort this group out.
     
  12. Jun 3, 2016 #12

    eteson

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    Nice pictures
    IMHO ecuadorense and pearcei are the same thing .You can find very small differences (size? and petal angle) to split them in two species. Richteri=Taras=Merinoi is a hybrid and can be easily distinguished from pearcei.
     
  13. Jun 6, 2016 #13

    paphioboy

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    Very nice bunch, Rick..
     
  14. Jun 7, 2016 #14

    John M

    John M

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    Ooooh, I really like the richteri! It's very vigorous and beautiful!
     
  15. Jun 12, 2016 #15

    Brabantia

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    How do you manage the pH of your potting whit such high ratio NH4+/NO3_ ? Sometimes dit you measure the pH by the pour throug method ?
     
  16. Jun 13, 2016 #16

    Bjorn

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    There is a generous amount of citric acid in the system so the system is well buffered and the initial pH of the fertilising water is around 5.5-6 (at 50-60ppm).
    I have measured pour-through a couple of times and never found any different from what I feed in , pH 5-6..
    This story about acidifying of the substrate by NH4+ uptake is probably true for regular plants in soil but for paphs I think it is questionable.
    Remember, also paphs have velamen, secondly; at least I pour so much water (with fertiliser) through every day that the possible influence iof the plants metabolites is totally irrelevant. But generally, ammonium(NH4+) in water gives an acidic reaction that is true;) But that is not because of any plant metabolism.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2016

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