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Cold tolerant Phrags and paphs

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toddybear

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I need suggestions please! My slipper area is now overflowing and any new ones wwould have to go into the Odont growing area where the winter temps are 55 F night and 65 F day. Which phrags could tolerate this? I know bulldog paphs could (but I'm not keen on those)..I grow my gratrixianum there already and its fine. I assume no multifloral or sequential bloomers could tolerate that much cold, but how about some of the parvis and their hybrids? Thanks for any help/suggestions.
 
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Drorchid

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We grow Paph insigne, Paph spicerianum and Paph fairrieanum in our cool house and they all do well. Probably your parvi's will do well there too.

Robert
 
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Drorchid

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Oh, and I forgot, most of your Phrag's should do well there too. We used to grow all our Phrag's in the warmest green house, where we have our Cattleya's, but two years ago we moved all our "Studs" to the cool house (where we grow our intergenerics, Masdevallia's and Miltonia'a) and they are growing well; our besseae's actually like it better there.

Robert
 

carrilloenglish

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Your parvis will do okay. In nature some of them grow in areas where light snow falls -- specifically armeniacum and miranthum. The high in your cool house may be a little low but there is no harm in trying.

Christian
 
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goldenrose

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I agree with others. I found they do better if left a little on the dry side with the lower temps, as it would be in nature.
 

Rick

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Those temps would be very easy for armeniacum and micranthum. They can tolerate 40's with no problem.

You could add hirsutisimum, tigrinum, henryanum, and purpuratum to your list.

Actually 55 is my bottom limit for just about my entire collection. I don't think the multis, and south pacific barbata like it for the most but they are doing oK.

This past winter I nudged the GH minimal core temp to around 59, and warmer loving plants grew a bit better this spring.
 

toddybear

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Would the cold-tolerant parvis include such hybrids as Norito hasegawa, Joyce Hasegawa, Lynleigh Kopowitz or Wossner Armenijack? I have those in the warm room and would move them to the cooler to make room for some smaller roth hybrids!
 
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goldenrose

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What do you think is the lowest daytime temp. that multifloral species paphs can take?
I don't think it's a question can they take it? What's the lowest temp they they will remain actively growing? (Some are slow growing to begin with, let's not make it worse!)
Do you want them sulking, susceptible to rot/fungus? Of course not but once it starts to happen & you notice it, isn't it now going to set the plant back?It's a hard question because humidity & light have to come into play as well.
 
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Ellen

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The place where I keep most of my phrags gets down in the 50s at night in the winter, and they seem to do fine. Right now it's probably 80s in the day, 60s at night and they're growing like crazy. They get full light year round and quite a bit of air movement.
 

SlipperFan

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Phrag besseae! Actually, I've heard besseae hybrids bloom out better w/ cool nights.
That's probably true. I've had my Don Wimber outside for about a month now, and the color is much more intense on the current blooms than the ones that were there when I left on vacation 3 weeks ago. It's back inside now, 'cause I don't like the bugs that get on it outside, so it will be interesting to see if the color intensity decreases on the next flowers.
 

rdlsreno

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That's probably true. I've had my Don Wimber outside for about a month now, and the color is much more intense on the current blooms than the ones that were there when I left on vacation 3 weeks ago. It's back inside now, 'cause I don't like the bugs that get on it outside, so it will be interesting to see if the color intensity decreases on the next flowers.

Agree!

Ramon:)
 
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