Cold growing paphs

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LukeC

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These are; P. Armeniacum (basket), P. Micranthum, P. Malipoense and P. Armeniacum x Delenatii. All are in bud, growing in my cold greenhouse which is mostly for my Odontoglossum collection, goes down to around 10C, a couple of times it has dipped below 9 C but they seem to be happy. If the blooms are good on the Armeniacum and Micranthum I will do a selfing. The paph in the background is Kolosand, shouldn't like the cold, but it does.
 

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How long have you been growing these in your cool conditions? Would love to hear more about it!

I decided to experiment with a minimally heated greenhouse this year and Paph. micranthum as well as Paph. armeniacum are two of my test subjects! Granted, P. micranthum is a species that I've read can tolerate frost and apparently may even encounter snow on occaision in parts of its native range if memory serves correctly.

So far, my new growing area temps have dropped down to around 36F (~2C) once or twice, but generally the lowest the plants are receiving is around 38F (~3C), and on average the lows are actually closer to 42F (~5C). So far so good. The Paph test subjects aren't growing this time of year that I'm aware of, and I do keep them dry but humid, only watering during warmer weather stretches.

Paph. maliopense is one of my most favorite Paph. species (though it would be hard to choose an absolute favorite and even if I could it would change frequently). I actually was under the impression that malipoense prefers temps on the warmer side of intermediate based on past reading, but I'm also not super surprised that it handles the temperatures you mentioned.

I've also got a random assortment of other genera in the minimally heated greenhouse. Some I'm certain can tolerate these cold temperatures for at least part of the year as long as it doesn't freeze. Others, I'm taking some chances with for the sake of curiosity.

I can say though, that I wouldn't have even bothered to try something like a Paph. Kolosand, so that's quite an interesting tidbit to hear it can tolerate cooler temps. Maybe you should cross your Kolosand with some of the Parvies see how the offspring turn out?
 
There are a lot of misconceptions about growing Paphs. Just because a plant comes from a hot climate doesn’t mean it requires it. My entire collection is outside here in Adelaide, with a mean winter minimum of 7C, rarely going under 2C on the coldest of nights. I have many brachypetalum group and hot growing multiflorals such as philippinense. They all grow and flower. Maybe they might be more optimal in a hot environment, but it is doable and it doesn’t cost me a lot in equipment and energy.
 
How long have you been growing these in your cool conditions? Would love to hear more about it!

I decided to experiment with a minimally heated greenhouse this year and Paph. micranthum as well as Paph. armeniacum are two of my test subjects! Granted, P. micranthum is a species that I've read can tolerate frost and apparently may even encounter snow on occaision in parts of its native range if memory serves correctly.

So far, my new growing area temps have dropped down to around 36F (~2C) once or twice, but generally the lowest the plants are receiving is around 38F (~3C), and on average the lows are actually closer to 42F (~5C). So far so good. The Paph test subjects aren't growing this time of year that I'm aware of, and I do keep them dry but humid, only watering during warmer weather stretches.

Paph. maliopense is one of my most favorite Paph. species (though it would be hard to choose an absolute favorite and even if I could it would change frequently). I actually was under the impression that malipoense prefers temps on the warmer side of intermediate based on past reading, but I'm also not super surprised that it handles the temperatures you mentioned.

I've also got a random assortment of other genera in the minimally heated greenhouse. Some I'm certain can tolerate these cold temperatures for at least part of the year as long as it doesn't freeze. Others, I'm taking some chances with for the sake of curiosity.

I can say though, that I wouldn't have even bothered to try something like a Paph. Kolosand, so that's quite an interesting tidbit to hear it can tolerate cooler temps. Maybe you should cross your Kolosand with some of the Parvies see how the offspring turn out?
I've been growing them with the odonts for about 3 years, using bark, perlite and limestone. I also have an Iantha stage and a much bigger Kolosand than the one in the pic out there too, along with a couple of Phrags, and cattleyas. I live on the East Coast of Scotland which contrary to popular belief isn't that cold, the sea keeps the temps up so we don't get much frost and rarely get snow. I was considering growing armeniacum and Micranthum outside in a rockery, given what you have said I think I should be fine. Like you I have heard that both can handle very cold temps and I think both often get snow.
 
There are a lot of misconceptions about growing Paphs. Just because a plant comes from a hot climate doesn’t mean it requires it. My entire collection is outside here in Adelaide, with a mean winter minimum of 7C, rarely going under 2C on the coldest of nights. I have many brachypetalum group and hot growing multiflorals such as philippinense. They all grow and flower. Maybe they might be more optimal in a hot environment, but it is doable and it doesn’t cost me a lot in equipment and energy.
Thats really interesting, sounds similar temps to where I am in Aberdeen. If I'm brave I might just put a few divisions outside and see what happens, I guess keeping them dry when it's cold is the most important thing.
 
Thats really interesting, sounds similar temps to where I am in Aberdeen. If I'm brave I might just put a few divisions outside and see what happens, I guess keeping them dry when it's cold is the most important thing.
Yes that is correct. They all have a dry winter rest.
 
I look at that from a different perspective.

Orchids are niche plants. They have evolved to thrive in their native habitats, so matching that as closely as possible seems to be the way to have them grow the best. If they really "wanted" different conditions, their natural territories would be much larger or different.

Sure, plants may be more or less tolerant of conditions outside of that, but that doesn't mean they'll grow as well.
 
I look at that from a different perspective.

Orchids are niche plants. They have evolved to thrive in their native habitats, so matching that as closely as possible seems to be the way to have them grow the best. If they really "wanted" different conditions, their natural territories would be much larger or different.

Sure, plants may be more or less tolerant of conditions outside of that, but that doesn't mean they'll grow as well.
Some miniature Paphs for example can produce a mature plants in flask in a little over 12 months. It’s fair to say the conditions are nothing like the natural habitat, but yet with the light, nutrients and temp they grow like weeds and exceed what the plants can do in nature. I find it’s always best ti work out what a species likes than where it comes from. Sure you can get clues, but the natural habitat can also put you on the wrong path sometimes too. People from the Andes for example don’t require high altitudes to live 🙂

Just food for thought…
 

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