CITES and hybrids

Discussion in 'Orchid Conservation' started by kiwi, Jan 1, 2019.

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

  1. Jan 1, 2019 #1

    kiwi

    kiwi

    kiwi

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Happy New Year everyone,
    I am after some information regarding the above. i.e. do paph and phrag hybrids grown in flask come under CITES?
    Thanks
     
  2. Jan 1, 2019 #2

    Ray

    Ray

    Ray

    Orchid Iconoclast Staff Member Moderator ST Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3,071
    Likes Received:
    128
    Location:
    Oak Island NC
    No hybrids fall under the auspices of CITES, and neither do plants in vitro.
     
  3. Jan 2, 2019 #3

    NYEric

    NYEric

    NYEric

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    47,354
    Likes Received:
    135
    Location:
    New York City Apartment
    No hybrids do, species do, otherwise we would all be growing rungsuryianums.
     
  4. Jan 2, 2019 #4

    kiwi

    kiwi

    kiwi

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2013
    Messages:
    344
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    New Zealand
    So are you saying hybrids don’t? Even if one of the parents are say kovachii or rungsuriyanum for arguments sake?
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2019
  5. Jan 3, 2019 #5

    Ray

    Ray

    Ray

    Orchid Iconoclast Staff Member Moderator ST Supporter

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2006
    Messages:
    3,071
    Likes Received:
    128
    Location:
    Oak Island NC
    CITES, by definition, is meant to control international trade in wild-acquired endangered species. The convention itself excludes hybrids and artificially propagated species.

    However, it is up to the various national authorities to apply the convention, and the extent to which that is interpreted and accomplished varies.

    For example, the USFWS refused to accept the entry of artificially propagated flasks of Vietnamese species - exempt from CITES - because Vietnam had never, ever, issued CITES documentation, or maybe I should state that as did not have an established, working, CITES authority.
     
  6. Jan 4, 2019 #6

    Hien

    Hien

    Hien

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2007
    Messages:
    2,370
    Likes Received:
    50
    I guess you are right, because the Chinese buyers came into Vietnam buying cheaply tons and tons of orchids as well as others plants, herbs, woods , animals etc...I have not heard of discouragement of trading between countries from those governments
     
  7. Jan 4, 2019 #7

    NYEric

    NYEric

    NYEric

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2006
    Messages:
    47,354
    Likes Received:
    135
    Location:
    New York City Apartment
    There are rungs and their hybrids being grown in Taiwan and Thailand. If you get flasks from those countries It would be interesting. Remember it is illegal to falsely identify flasks! :p
     
  8. Jan 4, 2019 #8

    ehanes7612

    ehanes7612

    ehanes7612

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2010
    Messages:
    4,335
    Likes Received:
    40
    Location:
    seattle, wa
    Also, the collateral effect is not to give full standing to hybrids made with species that are still in question. For example, the AOS would not certify awards given to Chia Hua Dancer at one time because of the uncertainty with the source of gigantifolium.
     
  9. Jan 6, 2019 #9

    Ozpaph

    Ozpaph

    Ozpaph

    Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2011
    Messages:
    15,264
    Likes Received:
    179
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    I suppose it depend what and where you're bringing into NZ/Oz. Ask Sam. I dont think he's had problems bring in flasks to Oz.
     

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page

Group Builder
arrow_white