Cattleya rex (Flamea) ‘Andean Treasure’ FCC/AOS

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DrLeslieEe

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We awarded this spectacular round and relatively flat 5 flowers on one inflorescence plant an FCC of 90 points today at the Lima show in Peru.

Let me know why you think we did that lol.

CEE262E3-0307-419D-8CA9-A470E319B91F.jpeg292489F9-1271-4367-8671-5AE4204A2522.jpeg71763CE0-5712-43F7-B578-53056EECAD7D.jpegCF70E39A-8E12-4293-BC03-C897FDFDE497.jpeg7316F3BA-5801-4CF0-BB97-04DB3898CFE2.jpeg

Note: the flamea part of name is more of a guide than actual true flamea. The flower presented with a pink line on sepals but on closer inspection, that pink was on the posterior back side! This pink stains through by reflected back light to appear on the front of flower. The analogy is like a shadow through a frosted glass.

This is a race of the Ayachuco, the warmer regions with down under purple leaf. CF70E39A-8E12-4293-BC03-C897FDFDE497.jpeg
 

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Nice flat flower for Rex, glad you clarified the flammea, as I couldn't see any evidence as I scrolled down.
 
Yep I would love to know how that earned an FCC.
Here are the 5 main reasons:

1. The form was good with almost no windowing between the sepals and petals. The dorsal sepal stands up tall with minimum curling at base and mild reflex at tips. The petals held quite near the flat plane as much as rex can be.

2. The color is clean and no bleeding or muted tones. The uniqueness of the pincelada markings that reflects from the back of flower to appear as if from front was a surprise.

3. The number of flowers on one spike (5) that was held without crowding and without the need of staking.

4. The very firm substance (thickness) of the flower surpassed all the other 20 or so rex plants in the show. This is eventhough the size was quite good.

5. The surface texture was crystalline like shiny diamonds.

All of these combined helped moved this plant to the high score.

Here is a sample of the award description I wrote for the award:

Five stunning well-shaped flowers on one strong unstaked 18 cm inflorescence; sepals lanceolate, recurved distally, cream, flushed light magenta along mid-vein on posterior side; petals obovate, cream, wavy margins light yellow; lip ruffled, cream, inner throat and side lobes golden yellow, midlobe magenta, veined yellow; substance firm; texture crystalline; from the race of Ayacucho. Judging team commented that this was the best rex that has been seen to date.
 
Wow , what a minefield. For most of us an FCC is a very rare achievement, I have wondered if in a species cattleya should it be the best in it's species or does it have to stand the test of being judged against all other species. For the moment I would say "best of it's own species". Some criteria in the handbook on judging simply states, 6.2.1.1 First Class Certificate (FCC) Awarded to an orchid species or hybrid which scores 90 points or more. On the making of the decision the guidelines are thus: 7.1 Quality The purpose of judging quality is to recognize superiority and improvement in extraordinary orchid flowers rather than recognizing commonplace characteristics. In scoring for quality awards(i.e., for HCC, AM and FCC), judges should consider and apply equally the following three principles: (1) the hypothetical standard of perfection, at the time. (2) the qualities and merits of previously awarded or known plants of comparable type, breeding or characteristics; and (3) the extent to which any quality or characteristic of the plant represents an advance over what has been witnessed heretofore and thereby establishes a new standard for the future. I appreciate the detailing of the criteria by Leslie that led to the decision. Remember many of us have very limited personal contact with this species, some are more informed. For me, the FCC test is the test of TIME. So we will see, in good time.
BTW. Rex, not easy to re-establish. Caution.
 

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Wow , what a minefield. For most of us an FCC is a very rare achievement, I have wondered if in a species cattleya should it be the best in it's species or does it have to stand the test of being judged against all other species. For the moment I would say "best of it's own species". Some criteria in the handbook on judging simply states, 6.2.1.1 First Class Certificate (FCC) Awarded to an orchid species or hybrid which scores 90 points or more. On the making of the decision the guidelines are thus: 7.1 Quality The purpose of judging quality is to recognize superiority and improvement in extraordinary orchid flowers rather than recognizing commonplace characteristics. In scoring for quality awards(i.e., for HCC, AM and FCC), judges should consider and apply equally the following three principles: (1) the hypothetical standard of perfection, at the time. (2) the qualities and merits of previously awarded or known plants of comparable type, breeding or characteristics; and (3) the extent to which any quality or characteristic of the plant represents an advance over what has been witnessed heretofore and thereby establishes a new standard for the future. I appreciate the detailing of the criteria by Leslie that led to the decision. Remember many of us have very limited personal contact with this species, some are more informed. For me, the FCC test is the test of TIME. So we will see, in good time.
BTW. Rex, not easy to re-establish. Caution.
Thank you DaveB for those comments.

I also wanted to add that it was one of the best rex that all the rex growers in Peru have ever seen of the Ayacucho type as well. I referenced all the pics they showed of their best plants (on their phones) to compare.

Now, if only our ST friends know what these two plants were lol.
 
Wow , what a minefield. For most of us an FCC is a very rare achievement, I have wondered if in a species cattleya should it be the best in it's species or does it have to stand the test of being judged against all other species. For the moment I would say "best of it's own species". Some criteria in the handbook on judging simply states, 6.2.1.1 First Class Certificate (FCC) Awarded to an orchid species or hybrid which scores 90 points or more. On the making of the decision the guidelines are thus: 7.1 Quality The purpose of judging quality is to recognize superiority and improvement in extraordinary orchid flowers rather than recognizing commonplace characteristics. In scoring for quality awards(i.e., for HCC, AM and FCC), judges should consider and apply equally the following three principles: (1) the hypothetical standard of perfection, at the time. (2) the qualities and merits of previously awarded or known plants of comparable type, breeding or characteristics; and (3) the extent to which any quality or characteristic of the plant represents an advance over what has been witnessed heretofore and thereby establishes a new standard for the future. I appreciate the detailing of the criteria by Leslie that led to the decision. Remember many of us have very limited personal contact with this species, some are more informed. For me, the FCC test is the test of TIME. So we will see, in good time.
BTW. Rex, not easy to re-establish. Caution.
I agree, David. Awards are relative to time. Some very old species cultivars have gone extinct and our modern versions can’t match them. Maybe more frequently, when I go through the AOS award records of species and hybrids it is easy to find examples of older FCCs that became less impressive as continued line breeding and remakes with more outstanding parents (or tetraploid conversions) take place.
 
I will admit i messaged Gerardo Castiglione, the Venezuelan Cattleya grower whose opinion i regard highly, about whether this plant deserved the 90 points. His response was 'Without a doubt. Very good', and so with his testimony along with the judging team's expertise, I dare not contest it. I would love to have seen the plants at the show and am looking forward to the award photos, measurements, etc.
Who was the exhibitor? Peruflora? Sr. Quevedo?
 
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