Who Likes to Cook

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Ray

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I like to cook, but my focus lies more on pork and poultry, and I've recently begun experimenting with vegetable substitutes for starches, such as spiralized zucchini and yellow squash replacing spaghetti in my Italian cooking, or a "fried rice" made with cauliflower.

Many years ago, I took a Julia Child recipe for a dry pork marinade (salt, pepper, sage, thyme, bay leaf and garlic) and tried it on baby back ribs. It is supposed to marinate for a few hours then be rubbed off before cooking. Everyone liked it so much that I started grinding it very finely and leaving it on. I started to get requests for the stuff, so bought spices in bulk and blended/bottles/labeled it.

Where I made my mistake was a 3# bag of bay leaves - do you know how big of a bag that is????? I have to put a few handsful in the food processer to "flake" them, then into a grinder to reduce it to powder. Once I got it all blended and the flavor "tuned", I ended up with 40# of the stuff.
 

cnycharles

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There’s also a ‘favorite recipes megathread’
But more visible food is always encouraged 👍😎

ray, I’d read where bay leaves contained carcinogens of some level. I’d seen in recipes where bay is in cooking but then taken out before eating. I’ve never seen bay in a recipe where it was left in or on. But doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen just I’d never seen it
 

Ray

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Yeah, and I’ve read stuff that says that’s BS, too.
 

Phred

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Rib roast coated with? Cooked in the oven or on the grill? Looks great!
I coated this roast with a slurry consisting of a good hand full of garlic cloves, Montreal Steak seasoning (McCormick), some dry thyme and olive oil in the food processor.
The roast was room temperature and put into a 500° oven for 6 minutes/pound then the temp was reduced to 170° for 2.5 more hours.

... ray, I’d read where bay leaves contained carcinogens of some level...
Hi cnycharles
There are a number or researchers studying a few chemical compounds in bay leaf. The existing studies have shown various compounds found in bay leaf may have anti cancer properties against breast cancer, cervical cancer and colorectal cancer. Other studies show they can slow the progression.
 

Linus_Cello

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The roast was room temperature and put into a 500° oven for 6 minutes/pound then the temp was reduced to 170° for 2.5 more hours.
Phred- have you tried the reverse, low and slow, finishing at high heat for browning/carmelization? I believe Americas Test Kitchen does it that way to ensure proper cooking temperature of the roast. Also I wonder if it would prevent burning the garlic (and bitterness). Or do you find your method of high initial heat (which I’ve seen often for turkeys) helps sear the meat and keeps the roast juicier?
 

cnycharles

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It would be a good thing if bay laurel had good things for you since I use it a lot in my soups/stews

I haven’t yet tried making a prime rib roast, but love eating it, maybe inspired to try it
 

Phred

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Phred- have you tried the reverse, low and slow, finishing at high heat for browning/carmelization? I believe Americas Test Kitchen does it that way to ensure proper cooking temperature of the roast. Also I wonder if it would prevent burning the garlic (and bitterness). Or do you find your method of high initial heat (which I’ve seen often for turkeys) helps sear the meat and keeps the roast juicier?
Hi Linus
I have done the “low and slow” method. I cooked three or four whole boneless prime rib roasts every weekend for a Sunday brunch at a Brooklyn restaurant I worked at for about 18 months. We did them at 275-325° for about 4 hours +/- a few.
I always cook my turkeys at 500°F.
 

abax

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I bake Challah once a week. Does that count as cooking? I consider bread preparation a
yoga exercise.
 

abax

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Paphluver, I've never seen that book, but I have several others. I'll look for Reinhart's
book. Challah is our every day bread for multiple uses. Do you make Challah from
time to time? BREAD by Eric Treuille & Ursula Ferrigno is a good go to book.
 

Paphluvr

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Paphluver, I've never seen that book, but I have several others. I'll look for Reinhart's
book. Challah is our every day bread for multiple uses. Do you make Challah from
time to time? BREAD by Eric Treuille & Ursula Ferrigno is a good go to book.
No, I've never made Challa or any other braided bread but I've been wanting to try it and think I've seen enough videos to understand the simple three-braid. Most of Reinhart's recipes are cold rise (up to four days in the fridge) and use a simple stretch and fold for gluten development rather than having to knead. Cold rise helps with flavor development.
 

abax

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The correct kneading is the yoga part. I don't braid unless it's a special occasion.
I just divide the dough into two bread pans since I give one away to my nephew and
his husband. Braiding is easy; the hard part is dividing the dough evenly to get
properly proportioned braids. Takes a LOT of practice. :>(

The cold rise does or doesn't use yeast?
 

Paphluvr

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The cold rise does or doesn't use yeast?
My apologies to Phred, I think we've highjacked his thread. Yes, the cold rise still uses yeast but in much smaller quantities due to the longer fermentation time. I use instant yeast because it can be mixed in with the other dry ingredients prior to the addition of water. The water temperature for the dough is also lower than normal water temperatures for bread, sometimes by a significant amount (read chilly), depending on the recipe.
 

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