V. William Bachcschmidt

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

PeteM

ST Supporter
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2013
Messages
481
Reaction score
511
Location
Baltimore
Source: R.F. Orchids, June 2019.
(V. Crownfox Keylime 'Hercules' AM/AOS x V. tessellata 'Crownfox Green' AM/AOS)

This plant has bloomed again, in the same month as last year. It has put on a number of new leaves over the year and I count 9 segments between spikes. Seems to be an unsustainable rate of growth for this grow space. Thankfully, it has a small side growth at the base because I am entertaining the idea of cutting it in half... working up the courage. The problem is I don't have many (0) roots on the upper portion of the plant to work with.

My initial thought is to hit it with root growth hormones to see if I can jump start new roots. Next, I want to make a partial cut into the mid section at the point I want to divide. My thinking is a partial cut would be enough to interrupt the current growth pattern, which would send a chemical signal to the plant that it has lost its lead and needs to allocate resources to start a new lead. Hopefully, the top portion of the plant will get the memo, and push out some roots! In theory, the partial cut would still allow both sections to somewhat function while the plant segments adjust.

The second idea, is to just make a complete cut. I would take the top cutting and flip it upside-down to grow it. I have heard (AOS webinars) if you cut a vanda in half and flip it upside-down for a few weeks, it stimulates more root growth. But after talking to Bart Motes, he seems to think these top cuts with no few roots rarely survive. I'm open to ideas or others experiences with dividing vandas, Thanks!


IMG_2009.jpegIMG_2017.jpegIMG_2027.jpeg
 

DrLeslieEe

Collector of new, rare and albino paph species
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
3,648
Reaction score
2,969
Location
TORONTO CANADA
Godzilla!

Unless you live in 100% humidity and in tropics, never top a vanda without roots (hoping to stimulate it, upside down or not lol). Angela's idea might work or make mini cuts on stem, one on each side to stimulate root growth above nicks (1/4 into stem one inch apart on opposite sides)... it works in Asia to form aerial roots.
 

PeteM

ST Supporter
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2013
Messages
481
Reaction score
511
Location
Baltimore
Is it really a lovely yellow-green (or the lights)? Beautiful
Thank you. Yes, there is still an underlying green ting, even on the oldest flowers. I did snap the picture before all the flowers have opened, and it’s possible that the flowers have not fully matured on the stem. I can check back in a week or two to see if the green completely transitions to a solid yellow.
 

PeteM

ST Supporter
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2013
Messages
481
Reaction score
511
Location
Baltimore
Godzilla!

Unless you live in 100% humidity and in tropics, never top a vanda without roots (hoping to stimulate it, upside down or not lol). Angela's idea might work or make mini cuts on stem, one on each side to stimulate root growth above nicks (1/4 into stem one inch apart on opposite sides)... it works in Asia to form aerial roots.
Thanks!, I’ll give this a go and see what happens. I knew there had to be an established method to injure the plant and stimulate root growth.
 

Linus_Cello

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2011
Messages
3,500
Reaction score
222
Location
Washington DC, USA
Godzilla!

Unless you live in 100% humidity and in tropics, never top a vanda without roots (hoping to stimulate it, upside down or not lol). Angela's idea might work or make mini cuts on stem, one on each side to stimulate root growth above nicks (1/4 into stem one inch apart on opposite sides)... it works in Asia to form aerial roots.
so air layering like for woody shrubs (maybe wrap nick with spaghnum moss)?
 

PeteM

ST Supporter
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2013
Messages
481
Reaction score
511
Location
Baltimore
so air layering like for woody shrubs (maybe wrap nick with spaghnum moss)?
Not sure about using moss or another media to wrap it. I would be worried about rotting the new root. I’m wondering if making a tiny amount of rooting hormone paste and applying it to the cuts would be enough.
 

PeteM

ST Supporter
ST Supporter
Joined
Feb 19, 2013
Messages
481
Reaction score
511
Location
Baltimore
Have you thought about air layering?
I’ll look into this more, someone has probably done this correctly and posted a video on YouTube :). Thanks for the input.
 

abax

ST Supporter
ST Supporter
Joined
Jul 9, 2011
Messages
11,917
Reaction score
500
Location
Kentucky zone 6B
I've air layered a variety of plants by cutting the stem where I want the new roots to grow,
wrap the cut with sphagnum moss, wrap the moss with Saran Wrap and leave a bit of
a hole for watering the moss keeping the moss just moist, not wet. Rooting paste
wouldn't hurt anything, but I've never used it.
 

Latest posts

Top