This is what people are being taught?

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

Kalyke

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2015
Messages
89
Reaction score
14
Miss Orchid girl ranks them easier than Phalenopsis. Meh. All orchids are hard as far as I am concerned.
 

SlipperKing

Madd Virologist
Joined
Sep 16, 2007
Messages
19,619
Reaction score
1,146
Location
Pearland TX
I couldn't resist to show you my P. malipoense colony. In full flower now. I just water them once in a while.
NO WAY! You can't leave me hanging with that tiny pic and short comment!
We need details! How did you attach the plants to the trees? With your photo editor?🤫
 
Last edited:

Ray

Orchid Iconoclast
Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
4,087
Reaction score
904
Location
Oak Island NC
Could you clarify what points do you have issues with?
First is the general ignorance of orchid-growing in general. “Warm paphiopedilums are […] typically harder to grow than their cool counterparts.” For some yes, certainly not all, or is that “typically” the case. It’s all about how the plants’ needs match what you can easily provide.

Light: dark green means they’re getting too much and yellowish means too much. “The perfect color would be yellow-green”. Seems to me the opposite is true- less light means the plants will try to compensate through the produced additional chlorophyll, making the plants darker green. I never want to see any yellow in my plants, except the flowers.

“A fluorescent bulb 6 to 12 inches above the leaves will ensure them growing healthily.” Is that a 12 watt shop light or a 40 watt T5?

After telling us that there are warm and cool flowers, the author then gives a single range of temperature constraints.

“Overwatering can kill orchids”. Nope. Insufficient air to the roots does it.

There’s probably more things I could disagree with, but I don’t want to contaminate my mind with more hogwash.
 

Tintin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
66
Reaction score
9
First is the general ignorance of orchid-growing in general. “Warm paphiopedilums are […] typically harder to grow than their cool counterparts.” For some yes, certainly not all, or is that “typically” the case. It’s all about how the plants’ needs match what you can easily provide.

Light: dark green means they’re getting too much and yellowish means too much. “The perfect color would be yellow-green”. Seems to me the opposite is true- less light means the plants will try to compensate through the produced additional chlorophyll, making the plants darker green. I never want to see any yellow in my plants, except the flowers.

“A fluorescent bulb 6 to 12 inches above the leaves will ensure them growing healthily.” Is that a 12 watt shop light or a 40 watt T5?

After telling us that there are warm and cool flowers, the author then gives a single range of temperature constraints.

“Overwatering can kill orchids”. Nope. Insufficient air to the roots does it.

There’s probably more things I could disagree with, but I don’t want to contaminate my mind with more hogwash.
To be fair, it is impossible to provide accurate culture information for ALL varieties of paph in one short article. I think she just meant to give a list of generalized guidelines relevant to paphi. I wouldn't get bothered by it. Not like she is selling it as an orchid textbook.
 
Joined
May 14, 2017
Messages
212
Reaction score
52
Location
Dallas, TX
The fact it is impossible is why she shouldn't try to do it. And in some cases in this article the advice is just downright wrong.

My frustration with it is that as a society member and sometimes vendor at orchid shows I meet a lot of people who lose plants, and confidence, by following the advice of these unresearched fluff pieces.

Worse still are the ones who seem to have a need to impress everyone by spreading bad growing advice without knowing or even caring that they do harm. I still remember a show several years ago where a lady overheard me giving watering instructions to a new grower and chimed in very insistently about the ice cube method.

A lot of first time growers get their plants as gifts at holidays, or when a child is born, or after a hospital stay. Many more give them a try since the mystique is still there even though you can buy orchids at grocery stores now. They have an emotional investment in their plants- and I have no patience with those who want to make money or achieve recognition based on giving advice they are too lazy or stupid to properly research for themselves before giving it.

Just my opinion- I see your side of it too and realize that people need to do their homework- so no attack on you intended, but it really gets to me when people try to monetize an expertise they don't have.
 

Tintin

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 21, 2022
Messages
66
Reaction score
9
I see why it is frustrating also. I don't get too worked up about differences of opinions on "right way of growing" because I find that experimenting and learning (together with your plants) make it joyful in orchid growing. I also never believe another's "advice" as the "golden truth", knowing the culture condition of theirs could be dramatically different from mine. With so many problems with deadly consequences in the world I think orchid growing should bring joy and gratitude, not frustration.
 

Sky7Bear

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2013
Messages
80
Reaction score
39
My friend Ray said," “Overwatering can kill orchids”. Nope. Insufficient air to the roots does it. "

Darn right, Ray. I think understanding principles is much more important than having "rules," which presumably are based on the principles but may not be understood. And what I'm learning from semi-hydroponics confirms what Ray said, but I take it further. I'd say the principle is that every plant (often based on genus or species, but of course these are "mixed up" by hybridization) has an ideal air/water ratio (which includes the environment it is in, particularly humidity, which is of course a ratio of air and water). These vary quite a bit, particularly by genus. So on one extreme, one has say, Tolumnia, and on the other perhaps Phragmipedium.

So, when I see that a plant is "too wet," it might be just as accurate (perhaps more so) to say "it doesn't have enough air to balance that amount of water for those particular roots." In addition to temperature, humidity, light, etc., one must also consider both medium and container. So, for example, I have a society friend who also grows S/H who can use a denser (wetter) medium in her house than I can in my greenhouse (40% to 90% humidity difference or thereabouts). When I receive a plant from Norman's Orchids, it will be in moss in plastic. I will immediately put it into clay because the clay breathes and the plastic does not. And I can water it twice a week with my S/H, which I could not do in plastic. I have a photo somewhere of a Catt growing in a fairly fine S/H medium but in clay, and the roots are great. In plastic, they would be rotted.

And beyond that, in S/H I have to consider the layering of the leca (medium). It tends to get very dry on top, so some genera (including both Paphs and Phrags) seem to benefit from moss on top of the medium.

Yes, too much water in the ratio can kill roots, particularly if they are not ones newly grown and adapted for that amount of water, but one can say it's too little air for that amount of water. Actually, I'm amazed at how wet some vandas in moss can be if they are in a basket, and same for Phals in clay. One can also get more air to the bottom of pots either by using "orchid pots," leaving the bottom empty as Gold Country does, or even using an inverted plastic net pot down there.

On a related note, I'm also having some success using living (local) moss, which is abundant here in the NW, in a net pot rather than imported sphagnum.
 
Top