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Paph Recommendations

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ElixirIce

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Hey guys! I really want to start growing more paphs (you guys are turning me!!!) but I dont know which ones to start off with. I dont know which species will grow well in my environment, so before I go off and spend my life savings, I thought It'd be wise to ask you guys first. I grow my plants in an east facing window that gets really good sun in the morning and a fair amount during the rest of the day. I live in southern california (about 30 mins out of Los Angeles). I currently have two maudiae paphs which seem to be doing pretty okay. I've heard somewhere that paphs with mottled leaves are more tolerant of heat, but I'm not sure if that's true or not! As you probably know it gets really hot here in the summer time, but lately it's been in the mid 80's daytime and the high 60's night time. Also, is it better to get seedlings or a larger, more esatblished plant? I'm in LOVE with sanderianums, but I dont know if they'll grow well here, sooo... I'd love any advice you guys can give me!

Everyone keeps saying that the only questions that are stupid are the ones you don't ask... here's hoping that's true! haha
BTW... look guys! My user description says I'm a not a "bloom" anymore! I'm a POD! yeeeahh! hahaha... sorry... too happy :)
 

Jon in SW Ohio

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ROTHSCHILDIANUM!

Sorry, that always happens...ask John :poke:

Seriously though, figure out what you like and figure out how much you're willing to spend on it. Most paphs are quite tolerant of being "windowsill orchids" so it's basically a question of preference and how much time you're willing to wait between blooms.

Sanderianum is a wonderful plant and easily one of my favorites too. But the cost of a division is more than most want to spend. Seedlings are usually pretty affordable (especially if you compare them to a newly acquired coral addiction...we'll get to that later) but can be annoying.
What draws you to sanderianum, the flowers? Of course. But, you spend the money on a seedling and for the next few months while it adapts to your conditions, it seemingly doesn't grow. Then when it is adjusted it starts growing "fast" and you still must wait patiently for a few more years before it is blooming size. When it is blooming size, time stands still again...this time it's mental though. Finally it blooms, and will last a month or two if you're lucky. Then back to waiting and watching for another year or more. Ever wonder why you don't see more pics of them in bloom on the forums?

So my recommendations are to get a sanderianum and a bunch of "quick" paphs to bide your time with. Some of my favorites are henryanum, sukhakulii, venustum, delenatii, and charlesworthii to name a few species. Mottled leaved ones are always nice, becuase they are exotic even when not blooming. Multifloral hybrids tend to be quicker and more vigorous than their parent species and have a lot of WOW factor in person.

Trust me, buy what you like. Either they'll adapt and grow well, or you'll fold and get things to improve their environment like a humidifier and they'll grow well.

Jon
________
Honda nx50
 
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kentuckiense

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Seconding the delenatii recomendation. Easy, forgiving, beautiful. While you're at it, pick up a Lynleigh Koopowitz!
 

NYEric

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Hi. How did the job interview go? My only recommendation would be to get the biggest and healthiest plants you can find. I was lucky to find some vendors [Parkside, Piping Rock and Ratcliffe] who sell plants that are big and multi-growth. That way my less than perfect growing didn't kill all the growths. "Try it you'll like it.." E.
 

Rick

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Also check out the sequential flower species and hybrids. These are very easy growers and almost always have a bloom open year round.
 

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