Florida growing

Discussion in 'Slipper Orchid Culture' started by randbrod104, Jan 20, 2020.

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  1. Jan 20, 2020 #1

    randbrod104

    randbrod104

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    I live in Sarasota. Which paphs/phrags would be best to grow in my climate - temps 92-4/70-3 in summer; 50-70/50s in winter. Sometimes into 40s and occasionally 30s.
     
  2. Jan 20, 2020 #2

    NYEric

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  3. Jan 20, 2020 #3

    randbrod104

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    Yes. All of my orchids are outside all year long. Since we have temps dipping into the 30’s tomorrow, they have all been covered and/or moved inside my covered lanai. Some people bring them inside. I don’t.
     
  4. Jan 22, 2020 #4

    StreetVariety

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    Micranthum and Americanum gets frost at their native range occisonally. Look into them?
     
  5. Feb 7, 2020 #5

    NYEric

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    Unless you have a shade house you will kill most Paphs/Phrags in Florida in summer heat.
     
  6. Feb 8, 2020 #6

    Djthomp28

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    90s are tough for most paph (definently for Phrags). Other members may have some recommendations for shading and something like that to help them weather the heat. If you really want to give paphs a whirl, try the ones that grow near sea level: some of the multifloral paphs starting with hybrids of warm growers. Although not a multifloral, I think Paph exul can grow hot. The challenge is that they are not going to tolerate temps into the 30s and would need to be brought indoors during those times. This site will give you an idea of paph and phrag natural temperature ranges: http://slipperorchids.info/paphdatasheets/index.html

    Your extremes on both sides of the temperature range. You are likely going to need to modify your growing space in some way to make the grower range more narrow. For example, getting 85-45 would open up more possibilities.

    Are you a member of the local society or going to any shows nearby? Local grower may have tips also. Here is an old newsletter that may give you ideas: Paphs in Florida
     
  7. Feb 8, 2020 #7

    Ray

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    I grow my paphs and phrags out on my deck in the summer, and we see the 90's often. I do, however, keep them up against the house, which faces north, so they never see directlysunlight.
     
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  8. Feb 9, 2020 #8

    Phred

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    I was saving this for a separate post but thought it fitting here. I’m in South Jersey and the fall/winter can be cold and damp. I have this Paph gardenerii that started giving me one problem after another so I moved it outside to my perennial shade house... sort of it’s last chance if you know what I mean. The shade house is covered with 50% shade cloth and has plastic on the roof only to keep the rain out. The sides and ends are open. The photos below are of the November weather calendar for my place and the Paph gardenerii when I brought it into the house. I had to remove some damaged parts but the plant survived all of those freezing/below freezing nights in a row. I’ll take a picture of it’s present condition later when I’m home.

    372A8CD4-1582-442C-85E8-BA601756BC50.jpeg

    19CA9331-0525-4179-B111-1C82DBCAE093.jpeg 0A2572B0-8A27-47E8-95C2-611C691C33C0.jpeg
     
  9. Feb 9, 2020 #9

    Rockbend

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    Paph grow great in Florida - Selby Gardens has Paph. esquirolei in outside beds growing year 'round like mondo grass, and they bloom just fine. You might think of growing under trees or using a shade cloth 'tent' or roof over them. Shade from the 14,000fc+ summer sun and good air movement are the keys.
     
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  10. Feb 9, 2020 #10

    KyushuCalanthe

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    I agree, you need to see what they have at Selby. They may even be able to give you some advice based on their growing. I've lived all over Florida, from Gainesville, to Miami, to the Port Charlotte area. At the time I wasn't a big paph grower, so I can't comment too much about my experiences there, but I can tell you that water quality may be a serious issue it you use normal tap water. Ground water sources are particularly bad since most are filled to the gills with dissolved minerals, and if it is softened with salt, well, you get the picture. Those long, dry winters are particularly bad since you don't even get flushing of the growing medium from rain. Most Paphs, and especially Phrags, won't like all those minerals.

    BTW, I did successfully grow very nice specimens of Paph. philippinense and Phrag. schlimii, plus a few complex hybrids ("bulldogs"), back in the 80s and 90s. So, it certainly can be done! Good luck.
     
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  11. Feb 13, 2020 #11

    xiphius

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    I lived in central Florida (near Orlando) for quite a few years and grew many Paphs successfully. From memory, I believe Paph bellatulum and Paph spicerianum did especially well for me and bloomed quite reliably and profusely, so you might want to think about those and associated hybrids. I grew them both outside on a covered patio and a few years in a shaded greenhouse. The key (as noted by others as well) is to try and get adequate air circulation (or rotting can set in quickly) and some protection from that harsh summer sunlight! The humidity can really work in your favor though. Also, watch the insects if you are going to be growing them outside.
     
  12. Feb 14, 2020 #12

    Rockbend

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    People like to say "Bulldog Paphs don't grow well in central/south FL, especially the hybrids from the Pacific NW" but I have a buddy in central FL who buys plants from Theresa Hill, grows them in about 3000fc and temps into the 90s, and blooms them every year. Maybe not as bushy-lush as plants grown up north but undeniably happy plants.
     
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