Quantcast

Dividing virgin

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

C

Cinderella

Guest
I have never divided an orchid and I have to think about dividing some in the future...limited space. So, after you divide, do you usually have to wait a year or two for the division to bloom or do they just take off and not skip a beat?
 

SlipperFan

Addicted
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
43,287
Reaction score
14
Location
Michigan, USA
Cinderella said:
I have never divided an orchid and I have to think about dividing some in the future...limited space. So, after you divide, do you usually have to wait a year or two for the division to bloom or do they just take off and not skip a beat?
I'd say it depends...
Be sure to have at least 3 strong growths per division.
If they all have good roots, they should establish within a month or two.
Many orchids take a year from their last blooming cycle to bloom again anyway.
Some orchids do best when divided/repotted after new growth has begun, some before. Most do better after they are done blooming.

What are you thinking about dividing?
 

slippertalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2006
Messages
962
Reaction score
0
Location
Seattle, Wa.
I usually don't divide any plants unless they fall into seperate growths while repotting. They will bloom better and more often as larger plants. If size is a consideration, then you need to grow more compact plants.
 

Shadow

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2006
Messages
372
Reaction score
0
Location
Ukraine
slippertalker said:
I usually don't divide any plants unless they fall into seperate growths while repotting. They will bloom better and more often as larger plants. If size is a consideration, then you need to grow more compact plants.
Do you shorten the roots while repotting? I did not divide the plants either and I find that some of them have huge roots now. If they grow at the same speed I don't even know where to find the size of the pot these plants would fit in. :confused:
 

Heather

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
10,483
Reaction score
16
Location
Sacramento, CA. Outside w/ Southeast Exposure
I really try not to divide as well. I'd much rather have large speciment plants. Though, if I had something someone wanted and it was really huge, and could be divided easily, I'd certainly consider it. Most of my plants just aren't there yet.

I did divide once, under duress. ;)
It helps to have more than one set of hands, I found. Lots of roots to untangle at the time.
 
C

Cinderella

Guest
Hmmm. Well the first I was planning to divide is my Brassia Bill Switzer, which has outgrown its large s/h pot. It has at least 10 bulbs and 3 spikes, only the first of which is blooming so I won't divide until the others bloom. I like variety so I have 1 Brassia in my collection. It is a bit large for a small collection so if I want to keep it I really need to divide.
 

littlefrog

Hop-meister
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
1,109
Reaction score
46
Location
Mid Michigan
Well, if it just an oncidium... *grin*

Chop it up into two or three big pieces, and take the best looking one to repot for yourself. Bring the others to the next orchid society meeting and give them away.

The only way to learn is to do it. And if you are starting with the oncidium you are starting with something that is hard to kill, good choice. You really can't mess this up. Make the pieces big. Use a pair of hand pruners if you have to (dip them in milk before and after to kill viruses). Throw away anything that falls off as a single pseudobulb or even a couple, you don't need them. Remove anything from your division that is dessicated or mushy, including roots. You shouldn't need to trim healthy roots. Generously apply cinnamon to any cut surfaces. Pot as you normally would.
 
C

Cinderella

Guest
Thanks. I never heard of dipping in milk....I was planning to dip in alcohol, rubbing that is.
 

slippertalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2006
Messages
962
Reaction score
0
Location
Seattle, Wa.
Shadow said:
Do you shorten the roots while repotting? I did not divide the plants either and I find that some of them have huge roots now. If they grow at the same speed I don't even know where to find the size of the pot these plants would fit in. :confused:
Repotting and dividing choices always depend on what genus you are dealing with. Most orchids will have old growths and roots that can be pulled off or cut. Always get rid of the old dead roots when repotting, but don't cut vigorous new roots. Some plants will have lots of aerial roots like vandas or phalaenopsis and they shouldn't be cut. Paphs and phrags will grow lots of roots but they stay contained in the pot.

If you have great roots, you are doing a very good job of growing your plant. The roots are always the first indicator of plant vigor.
What are you growing?
 
M

MoreWater

Guest
I agree wholeheartedly with the little frog, but the milk dip is a new one for me. But then I usually don't have milk in the house.

Anyway, if you're unsure, it's safest imho to repot or divide when the plant is putting out new roots. It will get established sooner after the disruption than if you were to catch it during a different time in its growth cycle. Also, I'd keep a div with at least one growing lead for yourself.
 

littlefrog

Hop-meister
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
1,109
Reaction score
46
Location
Mid Michigan
Supposedly milk is supposed to inactivate viruses... No, I don't know how it works. I have some theories, but that really isn't helpful. This has been shown for tobacco mosaic virus and I think at least one other.

You can use reconstituted dry milk. We use 5% dry milk in the lab for blocking antibodies, I presume that is a satisfactory concentration for this purpose. You probably want to make (or pour) a new batch of milk at each repotting session.
 
M

MoreWater

Guest
very interesting. isn't it supposed to help with powdery mildew too?
 

Shadow

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2006
Messages
372
Reaction score
0
Location
Ukraine
slippertalker said:
Repotting and dividing choices always depend on what genus you are dealing with. Most orchids will have old growths and roots that can be pulled off or cut. Always get rid of the old dead roots when repotting, but don't cut vigorous new roots. Some plants will have lots of aerial roots like vandas or phalaenopsis and they shouldn't be cut. Paphs and phrags will grow lots of roots but they stay contained in the pot.

If you have great roots, you are doing a very good job of growing your plant. The roots are always the first indicator of plant vigor.
What are you growing?
It is my first paph that I'm concerned about. I bought it 1,5 years ago, when I decided to learn how to grow orchids. It had 3 growths and grew in 8 cm pot. Now it has 8 growths and grows in 18 cm pot. Unfortunately, I didn't make the photo of the roots, but the plant could stand on its roots without pot and medium. If it is going to grow at the same speed, I don't know what to do with it in 1-2 years time. I think, if I divide it, it will badly damage the roots. There are too many of them and they stick together.
 

littlefrog

Hop-meister
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
1,109
Reaction score
46
Location
Mid Michigan
SlipperFan said:
Milk kills viruses???????
I don't think it kills them. But it probably does bind up all of their surface proteins and especially the ones the virus uses to enter the host cell, which is good enough.

I am sceptical as well. But, supposedly it has been well researched. Given the cost and simplicity... Seems worthwhile.
 

slippertalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2006
Messages
962
Reaction score
0
Location
Seattle, Wa.
Shadow said:
It is my first paph that I'm concerned about. I bought it 1,5 years ago, when I decided to learn how to grow orchids. It had 3 growths and grew in 8 cm pot. Now it has 8 growths and grows in 18 cm pot. Unfortunately, I didn't make the photo of the roots, but the plant could stand on its roots without pot and medium. If it is going to grow at the same speed, I don't know what to do with it in 1-2 years time. I think, if I divide it, it will badly damage the roots. There are too many of them and they stick together.
The plant sounds very healthy.....When you repot make sure you pull out the old rotted roots. Every paph will have some. If you feel compelled to divide it, find a likely place on the plant to cut or pull it apart and just do it. If you have that many roots, the plant will be able to handle losing some.
It's kind of a leap of faith, and once the plant gets into fresh mix the roots will begin to grow once more. I wish I had such problems with most of my plants!
 

Tony

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2006
Messages
342
Reaction score
99
Location
Columbia, SC
littlefrog said:
Well, if it just an oncidium... *grin*

Chop it up into two or three big pieces, and take the best looking one to repot for yourself. Bring the others to the next orchid society meeting and give them away.

The only way to learn is to do it. And if you are starting with the oncidium you are starting with something that is hard to kill, good choice. You really can't mess this up. Make the pieces big. Use a pair of hand pruners if you have to (dip them in milk before and after to kill viruses). Throw away anything that falls off as a single pseudobulb or even a couple, you don't need them. Remove anything from your division that is dessicated or mushy, including roots. You shouldn't need to trim healthy roots. Generously apply cinnamon to any cut surfaces. Pot as you normally would.

Brassias are not "just Oncidiums." :poke: :D They are much more sensitive to being disturbed. They tend to sulk after repotting, and really hate being divided. Don't do it unless you really need to, and keep the pieces as big as possible.

Edit: I just saw it is actually a Brassidium Longlen 'Bill Switzer'. It may be less sensitive than a full Brassia, I'm not sure though since I don't do intergenerics. If you want a small Brassia you may want to look at a Brs. caudata, or any from the glumacea group (some taxonomists have moved these to the genus Ada), they are much smaller than most other Brassias.
 

Latest posts

Top