Cypripedium japonicum care

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mango

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Hello.

I just got a C. japonicum rhizome (dormant), unfortunately, the information in the web is shallow and confusing, some people recommend a dry dormancy and others a humid one.

There is not a reliable source. By the moment the plant is in humid soil, but I don't really know what should I do.

Hope somebody could advice me.
Thanks.
 

mango

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Thank you SlipperFan.
Let's wait for that someone, that should be a rare and precious information.
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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You mentioned in another post that you are in Mexico. That pretty much guarantees that your climate is too warm to grow them in the ground. I'm not familiar with growing japonicum...I've heard that it is difficult, at least compared to its close relative formosanum. But you would stand a chance at success by putting it in the fridge for at least 4 months. Make sure its not wet, but also check to see that it doesn't totally dehydrate.
 

mango

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You mentioned in another post that you are in Mexico. That pretty much guarantees that your climate is too warm to grow them in the ground. I'm not familiar with growing japonicum...I've heard that it is difficult, at least compared to its close relative formosanum. But you would stand a chance at success by putting it in the fridge for at least 4 months. Make sure its not wet, but also check to see that it doesn't totally dehydrate.

The city I live in, it's not that hot, now, in Fall the nights don't go over 20°C
I'm intending growing it indoors in a humus rich and well drained soil to avoid the heat of the Spring and Summer.

The thing is that in the information that I found, some people said that it should be protected from freezing and others that they could stand up to -4°C, so, I don't know what to think.

The logic leads me to what you say, it preffers a colder climate, so, maybe if I increase the wind circulation or water with ice cubes.. it is a whole new species to grow for me.
 

NYEric

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Bienvenidos de NYC! There are people here who grow them. In the Forum Jump box, below on the right, go to the "Search Foruma" tab adn once there search " Cypripedium japonicum"
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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Outdoors they will survive freezing temperatures. Indoors, in a pot, they would freeze. Most cyps require a 4 month minimum period of dormancy, and will do ok in a fridge a few degrees above 0 C. I myself have better luck with cyps in the ground than in pots.
 

KyushuCalanthe

Just call me Tom
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These are very water needy plants - more so than most Cyps, so skip the "dry" dormancy. They cannot handle humidity below 50% for very long either. As for winter dormancy, they require less than most Cyps - 3 months at or below 10 C is enough. They can withstand cold winters, at least plants from northern Japan.

One thing - this species is difficult to maintain for most people. They don't like pots either. They are best growing in woodland conditions in organic rich loam that isn't boggy, just perpetually moist. C. formosanum is a much easier plant and suitable to grow in near subtropical areas like my garden in southern Japan. I think you will be frustrated trying to keep C. japonicum in your climate however.

For more about both species, see this article on my blog:

C. formosanum and C. japonicum
 
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Dido

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I agree with tom
Try to get a Formosanum.

Do you live close to the natural Cyp habitat in Mexiko......
 

mango

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Thaks for that valuable information KyushuCalanthe, actually in my search for info. I found your blog before registering into the forum, small world.

Well, the main doubt is resolved, a non dry dormancy, very well.

I know this is a difficult plant, I'm going to take a good care of it but if my climate is just not suitable, well.. we will see.

Unfortunately I can't put it in the ground, it is dry 3/4 parts of the year as the rain season takes place for only a few months, so, the pot is it's only option.
I'm not that confident but I think it has a chance because some highland Nepenthes have grown here without problems, so, hope that's enough.

Dido, no, I don't live near that area, it's actually at the South of the country and I live in the middle. I could get an easier plant, but as this is a good challenge, I'm going for it, I think it's worth it.

Thank you everybody, this has been enlightening.
 

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