Quantcast

Cats and plants

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

C

cdub

Guest
I'm thinkin of adopting a cat and wanted to know if any of you know of any houseplants or orchids that are dangerous to munch on. My lowest grow shelves for paph and phals are just inches from the floor. I would move my most prized up of course in case any munching does go on. I also have the typical spider plant and aloe plants, christmas cactus, etc. I know things in the lily family can be pretty toxic, but I was unsure of others.
 

smartie2000

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
0
Location
Edmonton, AB, Canada
I do not believe orchids are poisonous generally. Serveral cultures eat them. In the past several pet birds ate some phal and cattleya leaves without getting sick, and they enjoyed nibbling on them unfortunately. I heard cypripediums are the more dangerous ones, but I have no experience, I just got my first one recently. I believe cyp reginae can cause rashes in some people, and people should keep thier dogs away from them
 
C

cdub

Guest
Great CFA website. I guess I could have found that on my own, I just thought someone might have some personal orchid experience. Guess I'll have to make sure my aloes don't get nibbled on. Thanks smartie!!

On a side note about the aloe, I came home the other night and saw a big "arm" of my largest aloe plant had been sliced off at the base. My soon-to-be wife was in the kitchen applying the leaf juice to a burn on her arm. I told her that next time she needed some aloe, to go across the street to Walgreens, not lop of a stalk of my aloe plant!
 

likespaphs

some call me brian
Joined
Jun 7, 2006
Messages
5,239
Reaction score
13
Location
Cape Cod
dude! i always lop off leaves. maybe you just need a second aloe, one to be used medicinally....
Cyp reginae is also called nerve root as it causes dermititis in some people...
 

Persephone

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 21, 2006
Messages
139
Reaction score
0
Lettuce leaves work great on burns. Keep the leaf (the darker the better) on the burn site until it gets warm, then change the leaf. Just a little info on behalf of your aloe. ;)
 

Rick

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
12,765
Reaction score
3
Location
Leiper's Fork, TN
I'd say that any orchid is dangerous for cats to mess with at my house.

It chews on my plants it gets the BOOOOT.:evil:
 

NYEric

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
47,863
Reaction score
230
Location
New York City Apartment
Heather said:
Yeah, if you get mad at your fiance for lopping off your aloe, what's going to happen to the kitten who chews off the orchid spike?
What's going to happen when she kicks your butt for not being sympathetic about her wound and your dead KAT!?! :poke:
 

Jason Fischer

www.orchidweb.com
Joined
Aug 26, 2006
Messages
334
Reaction score
0
Location
Minnesota
I don't think there are any orchids toxic to cats. Mine like to chew on leaves that look like grass, such as cymbidiums. They also tend to chew off paph and phrag spikes, so I can't really display them for too long. Basically things with soft or skinny leaves are potential victims to cats. Then again, some cats don't care about plants at all. I have so many around the house that they really don't bother them that much and would rather play with a ball. The funny thing is, when I get angry at my cats, rest assured, the next day I find a chewed up leaf... they know how to get back at me!
 
B

Barbara

Guest
Cats and orchids you say? Orchids aren't poisonous to cats (or birds) since everything likes to eat them.:sob: Cats also like to play bowling with them.:mad: Fortunately birds (parrots) are trainable, cats don't seem to be.
 
B

Barbara

Guest
kentuckiense said:
Philodendrons could be bad.
Ya, that would depend on how you look at that. My Cockatiels and Budgies like to chew their leaves, than I have sweet sweet silence for a little while until the vocal cord freezing wares off.:evil:
 

likespaphs

some call me brian
Joined
Jun 7, 2006
Messages
5,239
Reaction score
13
Location
Cape Cod
{to be sung to the tune of "why do you think they call it dope?"} why do you think they call it dieffenbachia...i mean, dumb cane....
 
B

Barbara

Guest
likespaphs said:
{to be sung to the tune of "why do you think they call it dope?"} why do you think they call it dieffenbachia...i mean, dumb cane....
:rollhappy: Sorry about that. You're right, I realized my mistake after I posted.
Dieffenbachia (dumb-cane) is what my birds used to try and eat which rendered them silent until I got rid of it. I believe it would probably do the same to a cat too, and it is painful as well. I noticed no long term ill effects, but neither did they have a chance to do this more than a couple times.
 

likespaphs

some call me brian
Joined
Jun 7, 2006
Messages
5,239
Reaction score
13
Location
Cape Cod
in enough of a quantity, it can cause one's airpipe to swell closed and one can suffocate.
 
O

olin

Guest
I Had A Cat For 16 Years And She Wasn't Interested In Any Of My
Orchids Or Other Plants. She May Have Gone Over To Check Them
Out But Never Harmed Them. I Was Lucky, I Do Have Some Friends
And Their Cats Do From Time To Time Take A Nibble....

Olin
 
W

Whitecat8

Guest
It depends on the cat, unfortunately. We have 3, and 1 could live in the orchid room and never bother anything. The second doesn't go after the 'chids, but look out when he's on bug patrol - everything's at risk as he flies through the air, landing on plants, trays, etc. The 3rd cat only snaps off spikes and, like Jason's, the grassy leaves. The miniature cym was on the kitchen counter for 90 seconds while I was in another room, and the tips of 5 leaves were gone.

Too bad you can't tell which cat will do what in advance.
 

Latest posts

Top