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sangii experiment

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Ayreon

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I bought a sangii last year but when I repotted it it fell apart in two equally big pieces. I decided to grow one in the darker areas of the green house since I have read that sangiis don't want much light. The other one I grew together with my multifloras.

The difference is amazing. The upper plant is the dark growing one. It's much bigger with dark leafs. The other one is pale and compact.

Yesterday I discovered that one of them is going to bloom. Can you guess which one?
 

Roth

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Looking at the pattern I would think they are 2 different plants actually as well...
 
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Ayreon

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Yes one can believe that.. but they looked exactly the same before I started my experiment. Unfortunately I didn't take any photo of them back then.
 

NYEric

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When I visited LienLuu he said that they grow in dark, moist, humid, garbagey looking areas, but most people are afraid to grow them that way. Good luck. Nice collection BTW, aren't you afraid of warping the wood due to moisture?
 
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Ayreon

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Yes, that was my biggest mistake when I built the greenhouse. I will have to replace them sooner or later.

Anyway, it's the one I grow in bright light that will bloom first of them. I will keep growing them under the same condition to see what happens in the future.
 
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Bob Wellenstein

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Light levels are almost always over rated for section Barbata, you are quite right. And, as one of the Rick's that frequents here has repeatedly pointed out, humidity (along with air movement) cannot be emphasized enough.
 

Candace

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I was hoping my sangii that I put in s/h last year were nearing blooming size, but I see I still have a little while to go. Mine are probably getting a tad more light than they need but everything gets more light than it needs in my g.h.
 
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Eric Muehlbauer

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I have noticed that my Maudiae type hybrids are usually bifloral when bloomed under the lights...........Eric
 

Rick

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I hope mine blooms this year. It's turned into a 5 growth plant and 2 of the growths are pretty big. I was pretty surprised how big a plant this species is.
 

Rick

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When I visited LienLuu he said that they grow in dark, moist, humid, garbagey looking areas, but most people are afraid to grow them that way. Good luck. Nice collection BTW, aren't you afraid of warping the wood due to moisture?
BTW We haven't heard from LienLuu in a while. I remember he lost heat last winter, and got super busy, but I was hoping to see some real oddball paph blooms this spring.
 

Roth

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Sangii can be pretty huge, I have seen 70-80 cm plants in Sulawesii.

There are 2 funny things about the barbata section, first they like to grow in deep shade, at least the long-lasting ones. In Philippines, where I have seen argus, I noticed that most argus in medium to high light were clearly monocarpic, where huge clumps would form in the shade. The ones in medium to high light had a single growth, and no new growth coming ( and no previous growths as well).

Several species as well never get water from the top, like some populations of hookerae, all the sangii I have seen, and zieckianum. The water runs from under the plants in the sangii colony ( they grow in a peat-like mix, very fibrous and deep, like zieckianum and wentworthianum), and because of the huge trees, water seldomly falls on the ground. This accounts for the gorgeous freshly wild collected plants with pristine leaves (nearly all the sangii straight from the forest looks like the one from the left on the picture, perfect beautiful shiny leaves). On the other side, the RH is extremely high, and at night time water condenses on the leaves when the temps get cool.
 

SlipperKing

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Ayreon,
I noticed your sangii has a strong pigmentation to the base of the plant. Mine does not. Can anyone tell me if this is normal for sangii's to vary that much?:confused: I just got mine last night from Glen Decker at the meeting. So I feel my plant is sangii:)
 

Rick

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Sangii can be pretty huge, I have seen 70-80 cm plants in Sulawesii.

There are 2 funny things about the barbata section, first they like to grow in deep shade, at least the long-lasting ones. In Philippines, where I have seen argus, I noticed that most argus in medium to high light were clearly monocarpic, where huge clumps would form in the shade. The ones in medium to high light had a single growth, and no new growth coming ( and no previous growths as well).

Several species as well never get water from the top, like some populations of hookerae, all the sangii I have seen, and zieckianum. The water runs from under the plants in the sangii colony ( they grow in a peat-like mix, very fibrous and deep, like zieckianum and wentworthianum), and because of the huge trees, water seldomly falls on the ground. This accounts for the gorgeous freshly wild collected plants with pristine leaves (nearly all the sangii straight from the forest looks like the one from the left on the picture, perfect beautiful shiny leaves). On the other side, the RH is extremely high, and at night time water condenses on the leaves when the temps get cool.
This is very good information Sangii. How cool is cool?

That peaty soil also sounds like they should like fairly acidic conditions at the roots. I do use chopped sphagnum in my mix.
 

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