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Natural Treatment for Bacterial Infection.

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gonewild

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I've been experimenting with treating bacterial leaf infections with a natural tree resin (sap) from Peru. So far I've treated 4 plants and each time the bacterial infection has stopped and the plant recovered. Fortunately, I don't have many infected plants to experiment with so my tests are limited.

If there is any interest in this subject I will be happy to answer any questions.

Here is a series of pictures of one small Phrag seedling that would have died quickly for sure.

The first picture was taken one day after I noticed a small soft spot on the otherwise healthy leaf near the base. The infection had progressed to this point in only one day. I applied one drop of resin and then took the photo later in the day. (The dried residue of the resin can be seen on the center vein of the leaf.)


12 days after treatment


17 days after treatment


21 days after treatment


34 days after treatment


43 days after treatment (today)


The seedling is alive and growing normal from the crown.
 

gonewild

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Ron-NY said:
I'm impressed Lance...which tree?? Sangre de grado ???
Yes. The Spanish name is Sangre de Grado which translates in English to Dragon's Blood. It is the sap of Croton lechleri, a small tree that grows in the open along rivers and other jungle clearings.

It got is name from the Spanish conquistadors that invaded Peru during the time of the Incas. In their search for El Dorado and the fountain of youth the Spaniards pushed over the Andes down into the jungle and got into big trouble health wise. They were all suffering from internal and external infections and about to die when the local Indians took pity on them and showed them a "doctor tree". They used the blood red sap and regained enough health to wipe out the Indians and return to the mountains to conquer the Incas. Bad mistake on the Indians part! The resin is harvested by slicing the tree with a knife and letting the sap flow out. it looks just like blood. After using the blood of the tree and seeing the "magical" results with curing their infections the Spaniards proclaimed it to be Sangre de Grado, the blood of the mythical European dragon that was used by sorcerers to cure illness.
Thus, Dragon's Blood!

In case you can't guess, I'm impressed too! It only stands to reason that plant products can cure plant illness. Isn't it a wonderful world?
 

ScottMcC

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hmm...what's interesting is that a tree in the same genus is used to make another medicinal compound, croton oil (from Croton tiglium). It is one of the chief ingredients in chemical peels used by plastic surgeons as one of many facial rejuvenating procedures.
 

bwester

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I'll be impressed when there is a more scientific study done. Did you have a control group? How constant was the environment? Temperature? Humidity?
 

gonewild

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bwester said:
I'll be impressed when there is a more scientific study done.
Do you by any chance make your living proving things for pharmaceutical companies? :poke:

I did not offer this as a proven thing or even a scientific study, only as a possibility.

Did you have a control group?
No, as I stated I've treated only a handful of plants. It is obvious from experience and the photos the seedling would have died without treatment.
For this casual experiment I think we can assume severe bacterial infections generally kill small seedlings so in a way that knowledge is a control group.

How constant was the environment?
The environment remained the same as the growing area. Light 1000fc 14 hours. The treated plants are no given any special treatment other than being slightly isolated from nearby plants, to prevent any spread of disease.

Temperature?Humidity?
Temps low 60s at night, mid 70's daytime.
Humidity 65% daytime, 85% night.

Contrary to normal post treatment for bacterial infections the plants have been watered overhead and misted daily with no attempt to keep the foliage dry being made. In fact the crowns often hold water for a short time. The resin is water soluble so when the water hits the dried resin it actually will re-dissolve and possibly re-treat the plant tissues.
 

gonewild

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ScottMcC said:
hmm...what's interesting is that a tree in the same genus is used to make another medicinal compound, croton oil (from Croton tiglium). It is one of the chief ingredients in chemical peels used by plastic surgeons as one of many facial rejuvenating procedures.
Yes, it is Croton lechleri. The genera is know to contain many compounds of medical interest. Pharmaceutical companies have proven the effectiveness of Croton lechleri for use in medicine but have failed to develop a product that can be patented that is more effective than the natural sap.

In any case I'm suggesting the pure natural product may be a useful tool to treat bacterial and fungal infections in plants. In fact Croton lechleri resin is effective with the control of viruses also. Wouldn't it be nice if it could eliminate a virus from an orchid plant?
 

Marco

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Cool. I'm gonna order some. Not to treat fungus on plants. But I wanna try it on a betta I have that has hazy eyes.
 

gonewild

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Marco said:
Cool. I'm gonna order some. Not to treat fungus on plants. But I wanna try it on a betta I have that has hazy eyes.
Oh Boy, I'm gonna get into trouble!
For your betta you need Catappa leaf. It is also called tropical Almond or Indian Almond. Just put a piece of leaf in the water with the fish. The leaf is available over the internet from several sources including our own webstore, ShopGoneWild.
We use the leaf in our aquarium in Peru. I won't go into fish detail here but if you want to know more PM me.
 

Marco

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They're in indian almond leaf water now. I got some leaves from somewhere online. Well regardless i still want the dragon blood stuff anyway :) you have a pm :poke:
 

bwester

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gonewild said:
Do you by any chance make your living proving things for pharmaceutical companies? :poke:
I'm an analytical chemist with obsessive compulsive disorder... nature of the beast, sorry.
 

gonewild

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bwester said:
I'm an analytical chemist with obsessive compulsive disorder... nature of the beast, sorry.
No need to be sorry. I respect your opinions. I analyze things as well, just from a different perspective and with different tools.
 

SlipperFan

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That is fascinating, Lance. At first I said, "Too bad you can't bottle and sell the sap. I'll be a lot of us who grow Slippers that are prone to rot would be interested in experimenting, also." -- but then I went to your website and saw that you do sell it. Hmmmm......
 

Rick

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That's pretty cool Lance.

I've used goldenseal root (a native species eastern US forrests) with some mixed results for bacterial infections on orchids. My wife is an herbalist, and when I asked her about dragons blood she said she's only seen it on the voodoo supply price lists, and is realy hard to get.

But I see it on the GoneWild price list. I'm goin to get me some too.
 
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Park Bear

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I order some this morning...I've lost a few small seedlings lately that look a lot like your phots Lance.
 

gonewild

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SlipperFan said:
That is fascinating, Lance. At first I said, "Too bad you can't bottle and sell the sap. I'll be a lot of us who grow Slippers that are prone to rot would be interested in experimenting, also." -- but then I went to your website and saw that you do sell it. Hmmmm......
Yes, we do sell Dragon's Blood at ShopGoneWild. It is bottled and sold as a dietary supplement along with our Healing Forest teas and other herbs from Peru.

My purpose for posting this info about the use on bacterial infections on plants was not to promote sales of the product on this forum. But I do appreciate any and all purchases. As I said I have only used it on a limited number of infected plants and I am not representing that it will be 100% effective. What I am saying is that on the tests I have done it has been 100% effective. I believe it may turn out to be an important aid to slipper growers.

In all fairness I will tell you there are other suppliers of Dragon's Blood. You can google it and find many places to order from, search for the Spanish name Sangre de Grado as well. You may also find it in some local health stores.

The resin we sell is bottled by our own small company. It is PURE raw sap from Croton lechleri. We purchase it directly from the rural forest collectors in Peru. Most commercial suppliers sell Dragon's Blood that is made from the extract of processed trees. Extracts are not the same as pure resin and are a result of a boiling process. Extracts may still be effective against plant infections but generally they are diluted with water and the heating process may have altered the structure of the resin. Some companies offer pure Dragon's Blood but add 10% alcohol. I would avoid the use of alcohol on infected plant tissue. Also the curanderos in Peru tell me Sangre de Grado should not be mixed with alcohol when used.

I do encourage everyone to try it if they have rot problems. Dragon's Bloodmay turn out to be an effective alternative to toxic chemicals for bacterial infections on plants. Please post your experiences to the forum.
 

gonewild

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Rick said:
That's pretty cool Lance.

I've used goldenseal root (a native species eastern US forrests) with some mixed results for bacterial infections on orchids. My wife is an herbalist, and when I asked her about dragons blood she said she's only seen it on the voodoo supply price lists, and is realy hard to get.

But I see it on the GoneWild price list. I'm goin to get me some too.
There are a few European herbs which are also called Dragons Blood. These are what your wife probably is seeing in the voodoo lists. I'm not familiar with those plants.

Tell your wife it is also called Sangre de Grado. She should find info about it, it is extremely effective for many human uses.

Interesting about your use of Goldenseal. There are multitudes of native North American plants which would be effective health aids. Too bad most of the knowledge was destroyed in the settlement of our country. The world believes we need to save the rainforests because the plant species hold so many cures for human afflictions. What we need to save are the forest people that know the plant species and how to use them. There are still a lot of plants left in the rainforest, but only a handful of people who know which ones are doctor plants.
 
E

ericapayne

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I just bought this. I lost a sanderianum seedling to rot last year, this sure would have came in handy.
Erica
 

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