Mealy bugs o my

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I got one plant that had hidden mealy bugs and put it with my multi floral paphs. I left for vacation and boom they seem to be having a party on my beloved paphiopedilums. I just want to get rid of them as fast as possible and want to know how to do that. If you have chemicals you use that work please share!!!
Thanks
 
I got one plant that had hidden mealy bugs and put it with my multi floral paphs. I left for vacation and boom they seem to be having a party on my beloved paphiopedilums. I just want to get rid of them as fast as possible and want to know how to do that. If you have chemicals you use that work please share!!!
Thanks
Actually I have a systemic insecticide that are granular, will this work?
 
Which granular insecticide do you have? imidacloprid? Whatever you have read the instructions to see if mealy bugs are covered. Imidacloprid should take care of them. I find that for the best success with established infestations two rounds of treatment 10-14 days apart might be necessary.

If there are only a few mealies present, you may want to consider a lighter hand before you break out the systemics or heavier duty pesticide, especially in you are growing indoors. An alcohol wipe or alcohol soaked cotton swap takes care of a few. Then be sure to inspect to see if others pop up. You could also use insecticidal soap, horticultural oil, or neem oil. These options work well for small numbers of impacted plants and small numbers of pest. I try to isolate and treat before I break out the heavy duty stuff. Insecticidal soap is my first line of defense.
 
In my experience, one should break out the “big guns” right away and do the treatment right, or you’re really only delaying the inevitable.
  1. Pick an insecticide labeled to kill the suckers. My go-to is Acephate, if you can treat outdoors, or Azamax. The BioAdvanced 3-in-1 stuff apparently does, as well, it I only have limited experience with that, and that was on a pyracantha planted in my yard.
  2. Mix to the label-recommended concentration. Not more, not less.
  3. Spray all the plants, wetting all exposed surfaces to dripping, and thoroughly drench the potting medium.
  4. Repeat that process two additional times at one-week intervals.
  5. If, after a month from that last treatment, you see them return, restart that process using an insecticide having a different MOA.
 
If you break out the heavy duty stuff, please read all labels, use proper PPE according to the labels, and mix according to instructions as Ray mentioned. Some pesticides are rated for outdoor and/or greenhouse use only. Also some straight stink, like acephate. I use acephate as part of my treatment regime before bringing plants in for the winter. It smells horrible, and the scent lingers for a week or two. I don't bring plants inside until at least 2 weeks after application. Otherwise I can still smell it. I am rather sensitive to smells to though. Experience may very. Just be mindful when using pesticides. They are poisons after all.
 
Those systemics are banned in many countries over here in the EU. Many of the surface sprays have also been banned / replaced with newer "bee friendly" alternatives.

So I don't use anything that like that, I mainly rely on regular vigilant inspections, removal by hand and spray with what's still allowed or leaf shine spray. Leaf shine spray is actually very effective at getting rid of them but some plants don't seem to like it which is odd considering it's intended to be sprayed on plants.

But... we can get many of the paphs that are banned or very hard to get over on the other side of the pond :D .
 
In my experience, one should break out the “big guns” right away and do the treatment right, or you’re really only delaying the inevitable.
  1. Pick an insecticide labeled to kill the suckers. My go-to is Acephate, if you can treat outdoors, or Azamax. The BioAdvanced 3-in-1 stuff apparently does, as well, it I only have limited experience with that, and that was on a pyracantha planted in my yard.
  2. Mix to the label-recommended concentration. Not more, not less.
  3. Spray all the plants, wetting all exposed surfaces to dripping, and thoroughly drench the potting medium.
  4. Repeat that process two additional times at one-week intervals.
  5. If, after a month from that last treatment, you see them return, restart that process using an insecticide having a different MOA.
Ray’s protocol is a good one. My step 5 is to carefully repot the plant.
 
In my experience, one should break out the “big guns” right away and do the treatment right, or you’re really only delaying the inevitable.
  1. Pick an insecticide labeled to kill the suckers. My go-to is Acephate, if you can treat outdoors, or Azamax. The BioAdvanced 3-in-1 stuff apparently does, as well, it I only have limited experience with that, and that was on a pyracantha planted in my yard.
  2. Mix to the label-recommended concentration. Not more, not less.
  3. Spray all the plants, wetting all exposed surfaces to dripping, and thoroughly drench the potting medium.
  4. Repeat that process two additional times at one-week intervals.
  5. If, after a month from that last treatment, you see them return, restart that process using an insecticide having a different MOA.
If I was to treat indoors azamax wouldn't be a good candidate right? Also what specific brand would be ok for an indoor setting. I can do it outside but would need to bring them back in within the day. Just don't want a terrible smell :) . Thanks
 
Azamax is a concentrated form of azadirachtin, the active ingredient in neem oil, without the drawbacks of oils. Here in the US, it is approved to fight varroa mites in bee hives.

That would be my first choice for indoor application.

OrganiShield might also be usable, as it is a super surfactant, rather than a toxin. Thoroughness of treatment will be the key, as it must come into contact with the bugs, larvae and eggs.
 
Azamax is a concentrated form of azadirachtin, the active ingredient in neem oil, without the drawbacks of oils. Here in the US, it is approved to fight varroa mites in bee hives.

That would be my first choice for indoor application.

OrganiShield might also be usable, as it is a super surfactant, rather than a toxin. Thoroughness of treatment will be the key, as it must come into contact with the bugs, larvae and eggs.
I used this recently and man does it stink! Still smelling it after a couple of weeks.
 
Since Imidachloprid-based products have been banned in Belgium, I've been successfully using 3% hydrogen peroxide diluted 5 times. I add 2 ml IPA per 100ml solution and a drop of wetting agent (Triton). I apply this mixture either with a brush or by spraying the whole plant. Of course, this mixture is not systemic and does not destroy eggs. But the treatment can be repeated after one or two weeks.
 
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