Cymbidium tracyanum

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GuRu

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Very nice flowers with the colouratin more on the yellowish/reddish side than on the grenish/brownish one.
............I judged one in Cape Cod that had 12 spikes over 100 flowers in a 5 gallon pot, six feet in diameter! I remember grower said it liked high light and cool dry winters.
Indeed, this species can grow huge and produce plenty of flowers.....these plants in flower are very impressive ones....but need plenty of space and this is the backside of the coin.
 
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I love the color on yours! Mine is more shades of green and brown. It flowers yearly but not spectacularly. I leave it outside until the threat of snow. Then it comes into my barely heated greenhouse (min. 45 degrees) for a month. Next it comes inside my grow room and sits in a south facing window until the last frost date.

It is a space hog and not and easy one to rehome. Mine it literally bursting out of a 3 gallon pot.
 

tomp

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We see tracyanum pretty regularly on the US west coast. I have a couple and might even consider them my favorite Cym. They bloom in late fall early winter, are beautify fragrant and truly exotic. First two photos are Cym tracyanum. Third photo is another species Cym eburneum which has a very similar look.42291C8B-FFD3-471E-8ECF-E84D9BF60E06.jpeg 915A3330-B719-43FC-B534-3E8784DF1DB9.jpeg 5669F97C-9F23-4291-BFC5-FEDE4F86438E.jpeg 42291C8B-FFD3-471E-8ECF-E84D9BF60E06.jpeg 915A3330-B719-43FC-B534-3E8784DF1DB9.jpeg 5669F97C-9F23-4291-BFC5-FEDE4F86438E.jpeg
 

DrLeslieEe

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We see tracyanum pretty regularly on the US west coast. I have a couple and might even consider them my favorite Cym. They bloom in late fall early winter, are beautify fragrant and truly exotic. First two photos are Cym tracyanum. Third photo is another species Cym eburneum which has a very similar look.View attachment 32323 View attachment 32324 View attachment 32325 View attachment 32323 View attachment 32324 View attachment 32325
What are your cultural conditions throughout the year?
 

tomp

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What are your cultural conditions throughout the year?
We are blessed in the San Francisco Bay Area with a mild Mediterranean climate, warm dry summers and cool wet winters (not wet enough these days. Summer highs avg in the 70F nights in the 40-50F, winters cooler but relatively mild. I current grow my Cyms in a greenhouse on the coast but can can do well outdoors if not drowned by rain and while they can take the cold don’t like a prolonged freeze. My GH ranges from high of 85F to 40F.
Cym. tracyanum can made beautiful large fragrant specimen plants that bloom early, however it is wise to repot frequently enough to keep to 2 gallon as Cyms can be hard work to break up when huge. Some folks use a coir/bark mix to make repot easier.
Try um you’ll like um.
 
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This is the nicest-colored form I’ve seen. I really like this species. My Aunt has had one for over 50 years and it’s insanely big; I repotted it 3 years ago for her after probably no repot for 15 years and it has refused to bloom since; it blooms in spring in the Midwest. Wenqing Perner has one even larger and if I remember correctly, the flower count topped 800.
 

tomp

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This is the nicest-colored form I’ve seen. I really like this species. My Aunt has had one for over 50 years and it’s insanely big; I repotted it 3 years ago for her after probably no repot for 15 years and it has refused to bloom since; it blooms in spring in the Midwest. Wenqing Perner has one even larger and if I remember correctly, the flower count topped 800.

Brucher, is your Aunt still speaking to you? ))

yes it is a nice dark cultivar ’Neal’, named for Neal Tadlock. Another nice cultivar is ‘Cindy’ which is more yellow. Both are beautifully fragrant.
A note on repotting: best to keep 3-5 back bulbs minimum and repot by end July (here) which helps to keep plant on ‘schedule’. I had a non orchid friend who didn’t wait for me to help him repot his wife’s 5 very large plants. When I got there he had split the plants into individual P bulbs and put them all back in the same pots. Took several years before the plants quite sulking and finally produced flowers.
 

werner.freitag

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a very intereting discussion , I did not expect
for me this Cymbidium seemed to be easy to grow and flower
but my plants get the weather of Northern Thailand, just protected by shade cover
the Cymbidiums get morning sun , not too much light all together
from November on there are colder nights down to 10Celsius/50Fahrenheit , going up again just now
this could be crucial
 

tomp

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a very intereting discussion , I did not expect
for me this Cymbidium seemed to be easy to grow and flower
but my plants get the weather of Northern Thailand, just protected by shade cover
the Cymbidiums get morning sun , not too much light all together
from November on there are colder nights down to 10Celsius/50Fahrenheit , going up again just now
this could be crucial
I agree they are easy to grow and flower, given what they like. You are correct the night temp drop is a key factor.
 
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