Cymbidium “Peter Torch Fire”

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BrucherT

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Rescue with half a root and one leaf, August 2015. This is 3rd blooming. It didn’t bloom at all until 3 years ago, when it threw up 5 spikes with 58 buds. Only about 30 opened then. Last year, one spike with 22 flowers but it only lasted a week. This year, off two mature bulbs, 5 spikes, 87 buds. The first spike to open was heading toward 100% opening but it cracked in the night under its own weight; I have it propped here but the last two flowers haven’t opened for 3 days. Spikes seem to grow, mature and open in waves, with a first flower on the second spike just opening today; curiosity, it is not the bottom bud that’s opening. I don’t favor hybrid plants but this Cymbidium has taught me a lot and we seem to have accepted each other. The red maroon color is very subtle and tasteful and I love that a plant sitting outside in 80% full sun all summer can throw this show. Knock on wood, it doesn’t seem to get pests at all, nothing chews it, no fungus, nothing. I do feed it with any extra fertilizer I’m using. It got a good dose of organic tomato fertilizer this spring. Repotted two seasons ago after its roots broke a sturdy nursery pot right apart. And there you have it, the story of Peter Torch Fire (or is it Fire Torch? I see it both ways). Anybody grow this critter? Anybody want pollen?

If you look behind you can see a wild-type Vanda coerulea giving its 3rd show this calendar year, grown in semi water culture thanks to First Rays magical potions, filter and advice (yes I plug his products and always will, his stuff opened a whole new world of growing for me). 5th blooming for that plant overall, 10 buds this time, most yet. I thought Vanda species were annual bloomers but this one pumped out 3 successful spikes this year with no special treatment and in fact it just sat in RO for 9 weeks this summer while I traveled for work. I should make a separate brag post about it but The light sucks for photos of a blue orchid today.
 

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BrucherT

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Not that I can detect. You’re the first to ask! I’ll try at night and report. Should they be? I think this is a mericlone so should be uniform across “population?”
 

abax

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happyrotter asked my first question before me...dang! Beautiful flowers and I hope
it's fragrant. Love that deep crimson.
 

mrhappyrotter

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Not that I can detect. You’re the first to ask! I’ll try at night and report. Should they be? I think this is a mericlone so should be uniform across “population?”
I guess the million dollar question is "What's this Cymbidium?"

Without realizing it, I assumed this is probably Cymbidium Peter Fire "Torch". I've read and heard conflicting reports on whether it is fragrant or not. In theory, it could be fragrant since it's 25% C. ensifolium (tends to be highly fragrant) and a large percentage of its genetic make-up (at least 50%) is comprised of species that are fragrant. Granted, there's never any guarantee.

If the flowers are fragrant, typically they'll be most fragrant around mid-morning to early afternoon. Some will retain a bit of scent into the evening and overnight, but in my experience that's much less common and usually when it happens it's very faint.
 

BrucherT

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I guess the million dollar question is "What's this Cymbidium?"

Without realizing it, I assumed this is probably Cymbidium Peter Fire "Torch". I've read and heard conflicting reports on whether it is fragrant or not. In theory, it could be fragrant since it's 25% C. ensifolium (tends to be highly fragrant) and a large percentage of its genetic make-up (at least 50%) is comprised of species that are fragrant. Granted, there's never any guarantee.

If the flowers are fragrant, typically they'll be most fragrant around mid-morning to early afternoon. Some will retain a bit of scent into the evening and overnight, but in my experience that's much less common and usually when it happens it's very faint.
So interesting and thank you! I have now sniffed it at pretty much all hours and…nothing. I have a C. ensifolium that threw 14 spikes this summer; it smelled like onions going bad.
 

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