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Cychnoches peruviana

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Mahon

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Nice male flowers! Have you bloomed it female yet? Looks great!

-Pat
 
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bench72

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Gosh, there's really a lot of stuff going on in that flower... i can't decide if it's the shape of the staminode or the frilly lip or all the spotting that's wonderful... maybe all...
 

Heather

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Beautiful!
I was just talking about Cycnoches the other day, and how amusing I found the pollen. :evil:

Seriously though, this one almost reminds me a little of a Gongora. Are they related?
 
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Greenpaph

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Mahon said:
Nice male flowers! Have you bloomed it female yet? Looks great!

-Pat
Not yet. It has bloomed every year for the past 3 years, but not female.

thanks
 

likespaphs

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Heather said:
Seriously though, this one almost reminds me a little of a Gongora. Are they related?
well...they're both orchids.
the subfamily is the same, but the tribe and subtribe are both different
 
M

Mahon

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Gongora is located under Subfamily Epidendroideae, Tribe Gongoreae, Subtribe Stanhopinae... Gongora is closely related to Stanhopea, Acineta, Coryanthes, etc...

Cycnoches is located under Subfamily Epidendroideae, Tribe Cymbidiae, Subtribe Catasetinae... Cycnoches is closely related to Catasetum, Mormodes, Clowesia, etc...

Though the flowers are "similar" looking, they are quite different... the two genera split apart at the Tribal level... flowers of Gongora are bi-sexual, while flowers of Cycnoches are uni-sexual... there are other additional differences between the genera, but I am too tired to write it all...

-PM
 
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Mycorrhizae

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With regard to male vs. female flowers, one Florida grower I talked to recommended lowering the light level for a better chance to get female flowers. Apparently under certain conditions an inflorescence can bear both male and female flowers, but it's really unusual.

bench72 said:
Gosh, there's really a lot of stuff going on in that ...
This sounds like what Nina Garcia would say to the next contestant about to be booted from Project Runway!
 
G

Greenpaph

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Mycorrhizae said:
With regard to male vs. female flowers, one Florida grower I talked to recommended lowering the light level for a better chance to get female flowers. Apparently under certain conditions an inflorescence can bear both male and female flowers, but it's really unusual.

Thanks Mycorrhizae,

I will have to try this next year! I do grow it up high with the Catts.
 
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Gideon

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Lovely, one of mine just started spiking...not sure which one
 

littlefrog

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I got a CHM on Cyc. peruviana years ago, which I named after my father. But, I'm pretty sure it is gone now. Sure is a cute species. It kind of set off my Cycnoches addiction (up to about 30 linear feet of bench space at this point...).

The female flower on this species is nothing spectacular. Rather, it is spectacular (big!) but completely indistinguishable from almost every other female cycnoches flower in this section. I much prefer the male flowers. But, of course you need both kinds if you actually want to propagate the darn thing...
 
M

Mycorrhizae

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Earlier in this thread I mentioned that there can be both male and female flowers on the same inflorescence. Well - I just happen to have an example. I know this is a thread about Cycnoches peruviana, but this is Cycnoches Jean E. Monnier (barthiorum x cooperi) with the male flowers in the upper portion of the photo and the female flowers in the lower portion. I wouldn't be surprised if it turns out this condition is more common with hybrids than with species.

 

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