A little mushroom and some roots

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Morja

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Paph delenatii alba
I've never had a mushroom before. This happened after I watered especially well and left it just barely extra moist yesterday anticipating a long weekend trip (which we have since canceled). It's okay, right? Repotted in December. It's probably growing in the top dressing sphagnum. I do water a lot due to low humidity and lately I've had to figure out the balance again because temps are going up and I've had a fan running more.
Look at those fat roots, though! It's growing them like crazy right now, and finally starting to put a little effort back into its tiny 3rd growth.
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Nothing to worry about in my humble option. Just pull that bad boy out and be done with it. I recently returned from a 23 day trip and had put my 20 or so compots that are growing in sphagnum moss into a clear plastic tub. Upon return there were a few shrooms in there. No problem at all.
 
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Nothing to worry about in my humble option. Just pull that bad boy out and be done with it. I recently returned from a 23 trip and had put my 20 or so compots that are growing in sphagnum moss into a clear plastic tub. Upon return there were a few shrooms in there. No problem at all.
Thanks Bob! I'm glad it's no big deal.
 
Mushrooms are NOT a problem. The mushroom that you see is the 'fruiting structure' of a fungus. From those mushroom caps, "spores" are released which is how mushrooms reproduce. They are fungi. Fungi feed on dead and decaying organic material. Not live roots, not live leaves and so on. Mushrooms thrive in very damp, humid conditions. The "spores" are incredibly tiny and are easily spread by a breeze or on an insects back for example. Everyone would prefer not to have them but they really cause the orchids no harm.
But say with a Cattleya and very old media that is breaking down and decomposing, I would expect to see more fungi there going after the decaying bark. That decaying bark could suffocate the roots, the roots die and then the fungi feed on the dead roots. That would be a problem. Solution: repot.
 
Mushrooms are NOT a problem. The mushroom that you see is the 'fruiting structure' of a fungus. From those mushroom caps, "spores" are released which is how mushrooms reproduce. They are fungi. Fungi feed on dead and decaying organic material. Not live roots, not live leaves and so on. Mushrooms thrive in very damp, humid conditions. The "spores" are incredibly tiny and are easily spread by a breeze or on an insects back for example. Everyone would prefer not to have them but they really cause the orchids no harm.
But say with a Cattleya and very old media that is breaking down and decomposing, I would expect to see more fungi there going after the decaying bark. That decaying bark could suffocate the roots, the roots die and then the fungi feed on the dead roots. That would be a problem. Solution: repot.
I'll take it as a sign that the humidity levels inside this pot are high! If I hadn't just repotted it 6 months ago I would be more concerned about media breakdown. I can still see air pockets and it seems pretty happy though, so I'll hold off.
 

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