Specimen plant re-potting?? Ginormous Phalaenopsis!

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.

Ndove

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2023
Messages
84
Reaction score
48
Location
Oklahoma
Hi all and good evening!

As you can see from the photos I have an absolutely MASSIVE hybrid Phal that (i think) is in need of a repot, although it seems very very happy right now. I think that its very overcrowded in the pot and although I know they like to be a little root-bound, I do believe it could benefit from some fresh media and a more sturdy pot as I am having a difficult time with getting it to stay upright with all those dang spikes!

I guess my question is, is this plant going to get really stressed if repotted? Should I leave it alone since it seems happy? Im at a loss here.. I really need it to be in a pot that can stand up on its own and hold the weight of the plant up. It falls over all the time...

I have it pictured next to a Phal. Jiaho's Pink Girl. A "normal" sized Phal hybrid. Btw, the name of the specimen plant is Phal. Nobby's Green Eagle "Gold Country" AM/AOS.

The next picture is of the Phal. Nobby's Green Eagle next to my 12 year old Phal. gigantea... talk about size. thats a lot of orchid in one photo lol.

The 3rd picture is of the Phal. Nobby's Green Eagle, spikes and overall unruly-ness...

Next photo- ROOTS!! lol
 

Attachments

  • Nobby_Pink Girl_2024_JPG.jpg
    Nobby_Pink Girl_2024_JPG.jpg
    3.2 MB · Views: 0
  • Nobby_gigantea_JPG_2024.jpg
    Nobby_gigantea_JPG_2024.jpg
    4 MB · Views: 0
  • Nobby Green Eagle_jpg_ 2024.jpg
    Nobby Green Eagle_jpg_ 2024.jpg
    3 MB · Views: 0
  • Nobby_roots2024_JPG2.jpg
    Nobby_roots2024_JPG2.jpg
    2.6 MB · Views: 0
In my opinion, it needs to be repotted. Looks like it is in moss, so get some of the best long strand you can find. Trim dead roots and any lower damaged leaves. I would try using a 6-inch pot, if you can fit the roots without breaking them. I would expect the plant to continue growing without pause. If you don't repot it, the moss will sooner or later rot all of the roots. I don't seem to be able to keep plants in moss for more than a couple of years. Your pot looks like the original container. Mike
 
Typically you will find me strongly in the “repot every 2 years camp”! I firmly believe that and preached it for decades. But, things have changed overtime.
Now I take more of an “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it approach. If the plant looks good, blooms well, why disturb it?
THE BIGGEST THING I THINK ABOUT NOW IS MEDIA TYPE!
When moss breaks down, things go down hill very quickly!
If there is a large % of Leca or clay pellets in the media, I would say hold off on the repot. That rate of rapid media breakdown is not the same. So it is more of a JUDGEMENT CALL!
And I will have to say so much of my opinion about repotting relies upon the repotters ability. If you really do not know what you are doing from selecting the right pot, the right media for your conditions, the orchid can suffer more from the repot then if it was left alone.

I use a different approach with my plants know that I grow under lights for 7 months of the year. I use a lot more fine bark, fine charcoal and perlite then ever before. Why do I feel that way? I NEVER THOUGHT PLANTS COULD DRY THIS QUICKLY INDOORS! Moisture retention is so vital!

I know that there isn’t much in the way of an answer to your question as opposed to the observations of some OLD DUDE who grows orchids! 50 years this year!!! Good luck with what you decide to do!
 
Whatever you have been doing has been great for that plant! I'd be in a quandary about how to proceed too, so will be interested in hearing the replies. Good luck!
 
Whatever you have been doing has been great for that plant! I'd be in a quandary about how to proceed too, so will be interested in hearing the replies. Good luck!
It just seems so happy, that I am afraid to disturb it but I HATE the plastic nursery pots and it also keeps falling over and I don’t want any of those wonderful spikes to break, I plan on showing it for a CCM hopefully next spring.
 
If it were me:
I would slip the flexible plastic pot off, remove the old moss and any rotted roots, carefully replace the moss with new moss or bark mix and slip into a bulb pan. I would not try to stuff the air roots in the new pot as they might break.
 
If it were me:
I would slip the flexible plastic pot off, remove the old moss and any rotted roots, carefully replace the moss with new moss or bark mix and slip into a bulb pan. I would not try to stuff the air roots in the new pot as they might break.
Thank u this was the exact thing I was thinking of doing. Although I thought about doing a bark /moss mix 50/50 because my environment does better with bark mixes. But it’s an old plant and it’s used to moss so I dunno. I’ve never repotted a Phal this big before
 
It looks like if it ain't broke don't fix it. With orchids there is more to it. How are the aerial roots helping the plant, are they harvesting moisture and nutrient and passing it on, probably not unless it is hanging outside and getting rain and foliar feeding. Also remember orchid roots will live if they grow into water but rot if you place established aerial roots into water. I suggest a very open mix, lots of leca or pumice and perhaps 35% bark. Placing air roots into wet medium does not work so expect root death. It is always better when new roots looking for moisture naturally penetrate down into the media. In your case the new roots had no where to go. When I see plant roots not going into the media and becoming aerial, it is because the plants do not regard the media as a good source of moisture or nutrient harvest, that is an observation lesson. Pic shows cattleya roots immediately heading into the media hunting for stability, moisture and nutrient. Note the open mix. Cheers. Good luck.
 

Attachments

  • roots.jpg
    roots.jpg
    151.1 KB · Views: 0
It looks like if it ain't broke don't fix it. With orchids there is more to it. How are the aerial roots helping the plant, are they harvesting moisture and nutrient and passing it on, probably not unless it is hanging outside and getting rain and foliar feeding. Also remember orchid roots will live if they grow into water but rot if you place established aerial roots into water. I suggest a very open mix, lots of leca or pumice and perhaps 35% bark. Placing air roots into wet medium does not work so expect root death. It is always better when new roots looking for moisture naturally penetrate down into the media. In your case the new roots had no where to go. When I see plant roots not going into the media and becoming aerial, it is because the plants do not regard the media as a good source of moisture or nutrient harvest, that is an observation lesson. Pic shows cattleya roots immediately heading into the media hunting for stability, moisture and nutrient. Note the open mix. Cheers. Good luck.
Thanks very much for your reply.

I do not want to disturb the aerial roots at all, not sure why a couple of people commented on here that. I never mentioned that in my post... odd. Unless people are mistaking all of those SPIKES for aerial roots? Maybe??

**I guess i should have put that as a disclaimer ** lol
 
Back
Top