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heliomum

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I want to buy or build a greenhouse so my house is no longer buried under orchids. However money is tight a.k.a not over $1000, and winds can get up to about 80mph. Do you know of any kits or blueprints for anything like this?:confused:
 

gonewild

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I want to buy or build a greenhouse so my house is no longer buried under orchids. However money is tight a.k.a not over $1000, and winds can get up to about 80mph. Do you know of any kits or blueprints for anything like this?:confused:

80mph wind + $1000 greenhouse = NO SLEEP when the wind blows.
 

Candace

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Kits for under $1,000 would probably have to be modified to deal with the wind. Where in CA do you live? We had a bad windy storm in this area this winter and I think the winds were in the 65-70mph. range. There were a couple of society members who had damaged greenhouses and someone had a friend who's greenhouse completely went down causing a lot of damage. Mine is one of the sturdiest I've ever seen on cement footers so it's not going anywhere. But, it was a lot of $$.

Whatever you go with make sure it's on footers, a foundation or something that will make sure it's anchored to the ground. Unfortunately pressure treated lumber, steel/aluminum aren't cheap and polycarb. isn't either. If you price out your framing and covering materials you may find that you may need to budget and save for a while longer. Especially if you want one that's a decent size.

I always recommend you look into your zoning building codes before thinking of building a g.h. or buying a kit. Most kits on the market don't have engineered plans and won't meet the requirements of my county, for example. Many counties in CA are very strict about size, construction and wind load requirements. I had to get engineered, stamped plans and it wasn't easy dealing with permits. Some things to consider..
 

Roth

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First you dig a deep hole then put a flat roof on it :D
Great idea. Many "french style" geenhouses were actually dug up first, you have to use stairs to go down. The shelves with the plants are just a little bit below ground level, and the top does not exced 1m about from the ground. The were very though, and I have seen even very recently admirable plants grown in such greenhouses. Plus your electricity or fuel bill does not go haywire during wintertime if you are in a cool area, and in summer, it is quite nicely cool because of the soil that surrounds the bottom...

But for 1000$ it is quit difficult to do for sure...
 
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goldenrose

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I would wait & save more $$$, what size were you considering?
I like Roy's idea & have considered it many a times living in the midwest to save on winter heating BUT in the summer it would be one hot box!
 
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heliomum

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I live in the San Francisco Area so freezing winters and blistering hot summers are not a problem.
 

Hien

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I live in the San Francisco Area so freezing winters and blistering hot summers are not a problem.
If the weather is not a problem, then why do you need a greenhouse? maybe you need a shade house [pergola] and not a greenhouse.
I agree w/ Sanderianum that partially below ground greenhouse will save you a lot of energy for heat & air conditioning (future energy price is going to be up the roof litteraly). This is similar to passive solar energy design houses.
I give my friend in San Jose a lot of my orchids, and he grows them outside.
 

Hien

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You should give your friends in NYC a flavum St. Ouen to grow! :poke:
:D how about a hangianum in lieu of the St. Ouen flavum, they are both yellow:poke::rollhappy::rollhappy:
 
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heliomum

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Just because I don't have freezing winters doesn't mean its warm in winter.
 
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Mrs. Paph

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I don't recall what area of CA or what issue I saw it in, but there was an article in the AOS magazine not that long ago about someone in CA building a shade house for their orchids rather than a greenhouse - they may have had other modifications for certain times of the year too to help w/ temps and sun... I'm not familiar enough with your area, so you'd obviously know if your winter temps might make it possible, but it might be an option for at least Some of the orchids crowding your house while you save up more for a large GH :)
 
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DavidH

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We've got a botanist here in Tucson who works at the Desert Museum and he grows many of his orchids outside, especially dendrobiums. They are all under shade cloth and get watered during the hottest part of the day in the summer to give them a little extra humidity. He feels orchids can tolerate the heat pretty good, they just need protection from the sun.

One caveat - he doesn't grow paphs or phrags.
 

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