Will anyone grow paph in such a strong light?

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Camellkc

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I am going to change the growing strategies for my multiflorals paph this year and use strong lights to grow some of the multi floral paph. For gigantifolium, supardii, sanderianum and their hybrids, low light is still used.
I think in particular for Philippinese, roths, kolopakingii and stonei also their hybrids, they grow even bigger and seems more happy. This strong light area also applied for godefroyae and bellatulum alba. Some photos showing the light intensity currently using is provided for reference. One of these photo shows the light difference between strong and low light area.

Anyone using such light intensity for growing paphs? Happy to discuss.
 

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eds

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I don't grow any Paphs under lights but I have a similar conundrum.

I have mine on a south-south-east facing windowsill in the winter (on heated trays) and then in a conservatory in the summer.

I am concerned the conservatory is too shaded for them as it has a brown polycarbonate roof (installed by previous owners!) but it does keep the heat down. The conservatory is at around 5000 lux at the moment but gets brighter in the afternoon as the sun swings around. The windowsill in winter averages 10-15,000 lux but can go up to 50,000 in direct light.

(NB. These readings were all taken with an app for my phone which, while it is apparently quite accurate according to a photography site when I downloaded, it is still a phone app so exact levels should be taken with a big dollop of salt!)

Would be interesting to hear what light levels others have under lights or shading.
 

Ozpaph

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some of those plants look 'too green' to me. Photos can be deceptive but it looks bright. I pretty sure my multis can be at 7-8000 lux diffused light, not direct sun. Try a few plants and SLOWLY increase the light - perhaps mid-summer isnt the best time to experiment???
 

CarlG

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My philippinense and rothschildianum plants can tolerate full Philadelphia sun, if adapted to it slowly. They can also take temperatures into the 90s F, again if adapted to the sun.
 

Camellkc

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some of those plants look 'too green' to me. Photos can be deceptive but it looks bright. I pretty sure my multis can be at 7-8000 lux diffused light, not direct sun. Try a few plants and SLOWLY increase the light - perhaps mid-summer isnt the best time to experiment???
Yeah, your observation is correct since I have been growing them in relatively low light intensity for the past 2 years. Currently is the summer time here and the temperature can reach 34 Degree C inside the green house though there is water cooling system provided. The side light is blocked 70% by phals hanged while most of the light is come from the top of the greenhouse. For the strong light area, only a 75% shading cloth is used at the top of the green house and no more. Until this moment, I can observe that most of the plants under strong light become happier and healthier than before.

This experiment only used for some species that is proven can adapt high light intensity, such as roths, philippinese, stonei, randsii, richardianum, kolopakingii and their hybrids. For those species that like low light, such as sanderianum, gigantifolium, supardii, intaniae etc. I still put them under the small shaded area and they looks happy from the photos.
 

Junglejewel

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Every single one of my paphs grow in a west window, where they receive direct, hot, afternoon sunlight for about 3 hrs a day. And when I say hot, my summer temps average 95-110 degrees.
 

werner.freitag

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I use 70% shade for all my plants , no glass , some get extra shade by others.
most Paphs get the full light , at least part time
in March/April we get even over 40C in the shade, very dry
then its only a question of water,
I can only use overhaed sprinklers because of the number of plants
under these conditions I have to water twice a day for 1-3 min
never any problem with burning, 2 Paphs in clay pots nearly died because of lack of water in this extreme dry season

so go ahead with more light and you will get more flowers and less pests
 

Camellkc

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I use 70% shade for all my plants , no glass , some get extra shade by others.
most Paphs get the full light , at least part time
in March/April we get even over 40C in the shade, very dry
then its only a question of water,
I can only use overhaed sprinklers because of the number of plants
under these conditions I have to water twice a day for 1-3 min
never any problem with burning, 2 Paphs in clay pots nearly died because of lack of water in this extreme dry season

so go ahead with more light and you will get more flowers and less pests
Thank you and your sharing gives me confident in continuing this experience. Unlike your environment, my growing area is extremely wet all the time but with relatively lower temperature. That means high light, high humidity and warm to hot contribute my growing environment.
 

Tony

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I have reduced the amount of shade paint on my new greenhouse and so far all is well, no signs of sunburn.
 

gego

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I have a 60% black net and a 80% clear sheet placed about 10 ft ave above the plants. They are happy. Next year I will modify this so that I can roll out the net when overcast. The height of shade makes a lot of difference.
 

gego

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and you should use white to reduce heat transmission and improve light diffusion
On the contrary,,, catch the heat and limit light by having the net above the sheeting. Or out of the greenhouse if you don't need the heat. The sheeting will diffuse and spread the light. Basically the sheeting is now your source of light.
 
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