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Sara_Cenia

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To start the leaves have always been super pale but recently those orange patches started popping up. The spots dont appeared after I self pollinated it. Room is 68-70 degrees f and 50-56%rh. Its leaves are about 10inches under a grow light like the rest of my paphs. 125A9FE5-B24B-40DF-82C6-85E726A6189A.jpeg B5EFBD90-67F8-4416-9E20-50647DBC0BBD.jpeg 1F6B22D4-C403-4BD5-A2B5-422B4E2947F0.jpeg
 
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The orange could ‘rust’, not a real serious disease issue. But to my eye, your plant looks stressed. When is the last time it was repotted with new media?
I have about 100 Paphiopedilums. Many are the same size. They get repotted every year. In fact, Paphiopedilums react very well to being repotted. They produce new roots rather quickly, typically 4-6 weeks later.
How often do you fertilize?
I have found that slippers can be repotted anytime.
 

Sara_Cenia

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That is good to know. I have quite the collection, but this was the only one showing issues. Most of them are healthy, but I’m still learning a lot about them as a go. I’m very grateful for the people in this forum always helping with information that backs up the books I’m reading. I bought it about 4-5 weeks ago from a greenhouse Its had the light leaves since then but only in the last week or so gone down hill. I will give her a re-potting and good watering when I get home tonight. As it happens I have a shipment of fresh media arriving today as well maybe everyones getting some refreshing. I do not know when it was re-potted last. I had not fertilized it since I got it because it was in bloom.
The advice about the rust? Unlike the powdery rust it does not rub off. It’s discolored or damaged tissue.
 
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When the overall cultural conditions improve, fresh media, proper light, regular watering, regular feedings, the rust should disappear.
Good air movement might help. Orchids in general like a nice buoyant atmosphere.
If the rust is internal, it could be due to a mineral deficiency. The overall pale color of the plant could be the result of too much light.
 

cnycharles

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If you just bought it a month ago and you’ve pollinated it, there are two stresses being put on it like bigcat says. It’s in a new environment and it needs more energy for the seed pod. Usually bronze or tan/copper colors are reactions to a chemical that’s burning a plant. This color often is rust, but usually the rust can be ‘moved’ meaning mostly on the surface.
It’s almost always a good idea to repot a plant you’ve brought into your collection as the media is what works for the vendors growing conditions, and you need to switch to what works in yours
 
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I am getting to old for this, I completely missed the point about you pollinating this slipper! How stupid of me. Why are you pollinating a newly purchased orchid? That is just extra stress being placed upon the plant as cnycharles pointed out.
Have you pollinated orchids before? What exactly is the name of this plant?
Self pollinating a species orchid produces certain results. You will get more plants of the same species but unless it is a great clone, superior in some characteristics, the results could be rather poor to mediocre at best.
If the root system is compromised and the mother plant is of less then ideal health, you may be making it produce a seed pod when it is not capable.
Besides, I don’t know if you are aware of this or not but Paphiopedilums in general produce very low counts in terms of viable seeds. A mature Cattleya seed pod can produce a few hundred thousand seeds. A good, healthy slipper, maybe 2-3 dozen seeds. They are famous for that!!

If it was my plant I would remove the spike with the developing pod.
I would make every effort to improve the health of the Mother plant.
Selfing a hybrid opens up a whole new batch of issues. You may only get 25% of the babies to look like Mom, if that. The other 75%, who knows?!?!? It all depend upon the genes involved.
 

Sara_Cenia

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If you just bought it a month ago and you’ve pollinated it, there are two stresses being put on it like bigcat says. It’s in a new environment and it needs more energy for the seed pod. Usually bronze or tan/copper colors are reactions to a chemical that’s burning a plant. This color often is rust, but usually the rust can be ‘moved’ meaning mostly on the surface.
It’s almost always a good idea to repot a plant you’ve brought into your collection as the media is what works for the vendors growing conditions, and you need to switch to what works in yours
I will keep that in mind as I am repoting a lot of mine coming up as big923cattelya mentioned.
 
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Sara_Cenia

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I am getting to old for this, I completely missed the point about you pollinating this slipper! How stupid of me. Why are you pollinating a newly purchased orchid? That is just extra stress being placed upon the plant as cnycharles pointed out.
Have you pollinated orchids before? What exactly is the name of this plant?
Self pollinating a species orchid produces certain results. You will get more plants of the same species but unless it is a great clone, superior in some characteristics, the results could be rather poor to mediocre at best.
If the root system is compromised and the mother plant is of less then ideal health, you may be making it produce a seed pod when it is not capable.
Besides, I don’t know if you are aware of this or not but Paphiopedilums in general produce very low counts in terms of viable seeds. A mature Cattleya seed pod can produce a few hundred thousand seeds. A good, healthy slipper, maybe 2-3 dozen seeds. They are famous for that!!

If it was my plant I would remove the spike with the developing pod.
I would make every effort to improve the health of the Mother plant.
Selfing a hybrid opens up a whole new batch of issues. You may only get 25% of the babies to look like Mom, if that. The other 75%, who knows?!?!? It all depend upon the genes involved.
Ive never pollinated any orchid though some have gone to seed from there time in the nursery in the past. I was just curious and exploring. I am aware they take many years to flower but its just an experiment for me. I had also been awarethzt they sent put out many viable seeds and when its hybrid its anyones guess what they will look like. It currently is is repotted in better media, in a bit different light set up and a newly clipped flower/seed pod.
 

Paphluvr

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As a longtime grower of Paphs I think I can say that I have never seen a healthy Paph that was that pale. It appears to me to be suffering from a mineral deficiency. I think you've purchased a unhealthy plant and you are now compounding the problem by pollinating a single growth, newly purchased plant. Is it potted in sphagnum or is that just a topdressing? Sphagnum can be a difficult medium for most growers. Have you checked the root system? Inadequate roots can lead to poor nutritional uptake.
 

Sara_Cenia

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As a longtime grower of Paphs I think I can say that I have never seen a healthy Paph that was that pale. It appears to me to be suffering from a mineral deficiency. I think you've purchased a unhealthy plant and you are now compounding the problem by pollinating a single growth, newly purchased plant. Is it potted in sphagnum or is that just a topdressing? Sphagnum can be a difficult medium for most growers. Have you checked the root system? Inadequate roots can lead to poor nutritional uptake.
Oh? it very well could be a poorly cared for plant I and exacerbated it by bring it it to a new environment and after a few weeks pollinating it. It has roots but they are not as healthy or robust as my others. The medium was quite broken down and not healthy looking. I cut the flower off, repotted it in brand new medium that is a bit more fine to keep them moist longer and yes that is a moss top dressing. Of all my papjhs this is the only one suffering. I think I started with a problem plant and just made it worse with some rookie mistakes. I have gotten some great advice in this thread to ponder like repotting more often and unlike lets say my psychopsis, it doest royal upset the plant.
 

Ray

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Paleness can be either from a nitrogen or magnesium deficiency.

Water it with 1 teaspoon of Epsom Salts per gallon. That ought to perk up the green.
 

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