What plants do you grow besides orchids?

Discussion in 'Hobbies & Critters' started by The Orchid Boy, Nov 28, 2012.

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  1. Jan 19, 2013 #41

    mrhappyrotter

    mrhappyrotter

    mrhappyrotter

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    Rick, I think that tilly is Til. cyanea, a species, isn't it? I love the Cryptanthus or Orthophytum (whichever it is) -- I haven't had a ton of luck with the crypts of that type, these days I stick to the small ones that seem to love me. The others are Neoregelias, but I don't know that group very well at all, so I won't even try to put an ID on them.
     
  2. Jan 19, 2013 #42

    Rick

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    The Til is probably a hybrid, the label just says Bromeliad, and looks like something you'd get from Home Depot or Whole Foods.

    The brown stripey spikey thing is Gerken&@#*something. I've been able to look it up off the partial memory thing from the friend that gave it to me.

    Neoregelia definitely sounds right for the others.
     
  3. Jan 20, 2013 #43

    Stone

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    Rick, The Till is definately cyanea (a species from Ecuador--loves water)
    The striped plant is Orthothytum gerkenii. ( a very choice species from Brazil )
    Its a terrestial-lithophyte and likes dryish conditions and a rocky cactus type mix.
     
  4. Jan 20, 2013 #44

    Rick

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    Well you can really tell how up I am on bromeliads (NOT!!)

    I've had the O gerkenii for about 3 years now. It's picked up a lot in the last year. But it still hates me with the wicked spiney leaves.:eek:

    The Tillandsia is very easy. It seems to pup every time I throw water on it. It came in bloom about a year ago, so I was thrilled to see the new flower spike coming up.

    I have a few other tiny "air plant" type Tillandsias sitting up in a basket with a Vanda. I recently noticed a bunch of new growth on one of those, so maybe it will bloom too.:)
     
  5. Jan 22, 2013 #45

    The Orchid Boy

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    I visited central Mexico and saw tons of epiphytic plants. Not sure what exactly they were but they grew on the power lines, cacti, trees, and buildings. There was also one tree that had what looked like Spanish moss cascading from the top almost all the way to the ground and the burros loved to eat it.
     
  6. Jan 22, 2013 #46

    Rick

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    Spanish moss is actually a bromiliad. It produces little green flowers.

    It can be found in southern states like Southern portions of Alabama, Georgia, and lots of Florida.

    People used to give me handfuls of this stuff for orchid displays and I normally killed it all pretty fast in the past.

    I snagged a handful from Hunter's AFB (my son is deployed down there) in GA a couple years ago, and its been growing very well for me now.
     
  7. Jan 22, 2013 #47
    Gingers, heliconias, we have a Lychee tree, Avacado trees, lemons, limes, pink grapefruit, Poha(I think they call them Gooseberries on the Mainland), Blueberries, Gardenias, Pikake, Puakenikeni, Jade vines, and Macacamias.
     
  8. Jan 24, 2013 #48

    emydura

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    Mick

    There is a bit on grafting Eucalypts in this link. It is actually an extract from a book on grafting. There appears to be a big section on Eucalypts although that section is not complete. There may be enough to give you an idea.

    http://books.google.com.au/books?id...AEwBDgK#v=onepage&q=grafting banksias&f=false


    Banksia grafts are looking good. Three species (burdetti, prionotes and ashbyi) are growing well.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Jan 24, 2013 #49

    quietaustralian

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    They're looking great David. What rootstock are you using?
    If you're after any Eremophila plants, let me know. If I don't have a particular species, I know a guy who will.

    I have tried most of the common grafts on Eucalypts with no success. The next attempt will be doing bottle grafts.
    Regards, Mick
     
  10. Jan 24, 2013 #50

    emydura

    emydura

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    They are grafted onto Banksia integrifolia. That is the most commonly used rootstock which is quite hardy and adaptable. Not everything is compatible with it though. There is still not a lot known regarding the grafting of Banksia's. Long term compatability can be an issue.

    You would have to do cutting grafts with the Eucalypts wouldn't you. They are a bit difficult to do with Banksia's. Seedling grafts work much better.
     
  11. Jan 25, 2013 #51

    The Orchid Boy

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    This grafting and other hobby that you guys have is pretty neat. I'm starting in growing and saving seeds from rarer heirloom varieties of eggplants. I also got a packet of heirloom tomatoes labeled "Red Cherry Large". I got it last year and saved seeds but haven't seen this variety this year and couldn't find a speck of info about it online. It has cherry tomatoes the size of ping-pong balls, is the fastest growing tomato I've ever seen, has tomatoes early, and is always LOADED with tomatoes. Ever heard of it?

    I'd love to see pictures of everyone's plants and gardens and things.
     
  12. Jan 26, 2013 #52
    I used to be into grafting cactus. I still have a few of my grafts, an Echinopsus, Gymnocalycium bruchii, and a few others.
     
  13. Feb 10, 2013 #53

    Rick

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    [​IMG]

    Here's that Tilandsia cyanea just starting to bloom.
     
  14. Feb 10, 2013 #54

    rdlsreno

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    I grow Itoh Peonies.

    Ramon:)

    Itoh Peony 'Yumi'
    [​IMG]
     
  15. Feb 11, 2013 #55

    cnycharles

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    nice flowers (on the two)

    by the way, on a hort blog i've recently seen (didn't read the article) where someone was asking how many members were going to be growing 'grafted tomatoes'. has anyone else heard of or grown grafted tomatoes?
     
  16. Feb 11, 2013 #56

    The Orchid Boy

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    Yes, grated tomatoes are being offered by more and more sellers. They take the top of a nice fruiting variety and graft it onto the rootstock of a vigorous and/or disease resistant variety. Check out this link for more info and a how to video: http://www.johnnyseeds.com/t-TomatoGrafting.aspx

    I have a Haworthia attenuata in spike now and it has lots of buds.
     
  17. Feb 12, 2013 #57
    I've read about how you can graft a tomato on to a potato, so you can harvest both. Unfortunately, the yields are less than if you grew the plants separately.
     
  18. Feb 12, 2013 #58

    The Orchid Boy

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    I suppose you could graft plants from the nightshade family onto each other and have some interesting combinations...
     
  19. Feb 12, 2013 #59

    Linus_Cello

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  20. Feb 13, 2013 #60

    Ray

    Ray

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    I am really surprised nobody has mentioned that perennial orchid "companion plant" - oxalis!
     

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