Quantcast

Variability from self crossed primary hybrid

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

myxodex

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2006
Messages
607
Reaction score
3
Location
London, UK
I suspect this is something most of you will know. My rather basic understanding of genetics suggests to me that a selfed primary hybrid would throw a lot more variation in the progeny than the original primary cross did.
Can anyone tell me if this happens in practice and do breaders ever do this to look for interesting variants?
Cheers,
Tim
 

paphreek

Vendor
Joined
Jun 9, 2006
Messages
4,383
Reaction score
1
Location
North central Minnesota
myxodex said:
I suspect this is something most of you will know. My rather basic understanding of genetics suggests to me that a selfed primary hybrid would throw a lot more variation in the progeny than the original primary cross did.
Can anyone tell me if this happens in practice and do breaders ever do this to look for interesting variants?
Cheers,
Tim
There was an article on this very subject in Orchid Digest a while back. The subject used was a Masdevallia primary hybrid. Two sibs from the same primary cross were crossed to each other, and the resulting F2 generation did exhibit much more variability than the original F1 generation. I'll try to dig up the issue, if I have time.

While I don't consider myself an experienced breeder, I do have a sib cross of a primary Paph hybrid developing in pod.
 

littlefrog

Hop-meister
Joined
Jun 10, 2006
Messages
1,109
Reaction score
46
Location
Mid Michigan
myxodex said:
I suspect this is something most of you will know. My rather basic understanding of genetics suggests to me that a selfed primary hybrid would throw a lot more variation in the progeny than the original primary cross did.
Can anyone tell me if this happens in practice and do breaders ever do this to look for interesting variants?
Cheers,
Tim
yes, and yes. An example that may not ever be repeated is cattleyas. Back when it was profitable to fill an entire greenhouse with one cross and sell the flowers, breeders did numerous sib or self crosses just to get the plant material. When you bloom out an entire greenhouse filled with one cross, you can get some interesting variants. Many of the most excellent cattleya studs were derived in this vary fashion.
 

slippertalker

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 28, 2006
Messages
962
Reaction score
0
Location
Seattle, Wa.
Sib crosses of phalaenopsis hybrids over the last 10 years or so, and they have created forms that are in many cases superior to the original cross. It kind of makes your wonder why it isn't done more often. \
Also a selfing of a hybrid cross will create segregation that will present a full range of shapes, and colors, some of which will be different than the original cross. (for better or worse)
 
Top