Vanda (Neofinetia) falcata Tamakongou (玉金剛)

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naoki

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Tamakongou is probably one of the most popular bean-leaf variety and considered to be a good beginner bean-leaf type. In addition to the small leaves, the flowers are smaller, spurs are shorter, and bloom toward the sky (called tenzaki). This is another old variety mentioned in the publication from 1855.

This plant is a division of the plant which Heather auctioned here (about 6-7 years ago). She got it from New World Orchids around 2007 and she grew it into a large specimen plant.

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abax

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Love the very special flowers of Neos. So delicate and beautiful. Is this one fragrant?
 

naoki

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I thought that I hadn't seen one without fragrance, but the flowers of bean leaf looks quite different, so I went to check it. It does have very nice scent! It is interesting that there are some variation in fragrance among varieties.
 

DrLeslieEe

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I thought that I hadn't seen one without fragrance, but the flowers of bean leaf looks quite different, so I went to check it. It does have very nice scent! It is interesting that there are some variation in fragrance among varieties.
You will also notice that the scent changes (different oils released at different light amounts) throughout the day in the same orchid. Perhaps to attract different sets of pollinators.
 

naoki

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You will also notice that the scent changes (different oils released at different light amounts) throughout the day in the same orchid. Perhaps to attract different sets of pollinators.
Leslie, are you talking about Neo or in some other species? This species shows some floral syndrome of specialized pollinator (e.g. long spur). A study suggested that it can be visited by several species, but long-tongues hawkmoths are likely to be the effective vector:

Suetsugu, K., Tanaka, K., Okuyama, Y., & Yukawa, T. (2015). Potential pollinator of Vanda falcata (Orchidaceae): Theretra (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) hawkmoths are visitors of long spurred orchid. European Journal of Entomology, 112(2), 393.

So if I were them, I wouldn't produce multiple different types of scent. The quantity does vary over the day as expected (stronger in early evening, when the hawkmoths are active), but I haven't noticed that the quality changes.

It is difficult to tell the difference in scent by sniffing, but I think my Polystachya pubescens does seem to do what you are talking about. Maybe this species is more of generalists in terms of pollinator choice.
 

naoki

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Thank you, Tom. I'm cheap, so I grow them with cheap clay pots with the enlarged bottom holes. I usually don't get the expensive sphagnum moss, so I usually don't have sufficient long strands. So I'm using the fat synthetic yarn on the top!
 
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