Two color varieties on one spike

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dodidoki

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Why are they considered two color varieties?
Thanks for question.As i know- maybe wrong- if yellow veins run to the edge of lip, this is called fma. chrysotoxa, if merge into yellow patches, called fma. dureda.
 

dodidoki

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so that probably means that these 'cultivars' are fliud and not truly different.
yes, i have more catts wich called normal form and flowered normal ones previously but this year many of them "became" pincelada " form".Second is a mooreane form, but petals have pincelada pattern, too.
 

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Ray

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so that probably means that these 'cultivars' are fliud and not truly different.
The plant only has one set of genes, so can only be one cultivar, unless it has been grafted. There will always be some fluidity in the appearance of flowers, as genetics is not the only thing that affects that.
 

Katahdin

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The plant only has one set of genes, so can only be one cultivar, unless it has been grafted. There will always be some fluidity in the appearance of flowers, as genetics is not the only thing that affects that.
There are some "mutant" hybrid cattleyas such as Hey Song "amazing thailand" that can not be mericloned (or even divided reliably). I wonder if both phenomena are due to mosaicism or epigenetics rather than simple environmental factors.
 
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Cearbhael

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I agree, flowers are what they are! No matter how “similar”, they may seem, they are as different as fingerprints! Absolutely identical usually doesn’t exist! Some plants will show more variety than others but wow, I am stunned by the slight variations that make each flower “unique”. If they grow seed, seed from one flower will be different than seed from another! Thus the uniqueness of nature! Probably why you see so many arguments over whether a new specie has been discovered or a new colour variant of a known specie! Ha ha, I love it!
 
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This species is very well known for having a lot of variation in the flowers within the same plant. The variation between different flowering can be quite extreme, far more that dodidoki shows above. The quote below is pinched from chadwick‘s description of the species:
The lips of C. dowiana vary from dark crimson-purple with and without gold veining to crimson with large yellow eyes, to lips that are virtually all yellow sometimes beautifully edged in pale lavender. One of C. dowiana’s most unusual characteristics is the variability of the yellow color in the lip. One year the lip may have only a small amount of yellow or no yellow at all, and the next year that same plant may produce a lip that is almost all yellow. The amount of yellow can even vary from flower to flower on the same inflorescence as can be seen in the Cattleya dowiana aurea‘Kathleen’ AM/AOS pictured in this article. This variability in yellow color even appears in the old lithographs of the 1800s. One of the most famous yellow-lip Cattleya dowiana is the clone ‘Statteriana’ which Linden featured in Plate 356 of Lindenia. In Lindenia it had an almost completely bright yellow lip. The Orchid Album also published a picture of ‘Statteriana’ in Plate 468 which shows a lip with only two enlarged yellow eyes with most of the lip being dark purple.
 

Ray

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For what it's worth, I once (pre freeze) had a complex phalaenopsis hybrid that bloomed white, pink, or yellow at various times. Never did figure out the causative variables...
 

DrLeslieEe

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Color anthocyanin potential is coded by genetics but the amount of deposition is determined by cultural environment such as cold nights or high UV deterrent or nutrient availability.

To be determined aurea or chrysotoxa in dowianas, a majority of the annual bloomings must produce the form of yellow lip.

In trianaes, the major markings on the petals determine the flamea designation. A tiny brush mark not wider than 1-2 cm is pincelada (not more than 1/3 of petal length) while a broad stroke in at least 1/3 of the distal portion is a flamea.
 

Guldal

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Color anthocyanin potential is coded by genetics but the amount of deposition is determined by cultural environment such as cold nights or high UV deterrent or nutrient availability.

To be determined aurea or chrysotoxa in dowianas, a majority of the annual bloomings must produce the form of yellow lip.

In trianaes, the major markings on the petals determine the flamea designation. A tiny brush mark not wider than 1-2 cm is pincelada (not more than 1/3 of petal length) while a broad stroke in at least 1/3 of the distal portion is a flamea.
Ah, Leslie finally decided to begin the course on Catt. designations, that we have all yearned for! 👍
 
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