Spring Ephemorals at Garden in the Woods

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

M

MoreWater

Guest
Now you tell us...lol

Hafta agree on the cool workplace - can't imagine mine telling me to go sniff the trilliums!
 

Heather

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
10,482
Reaction score
19
Location
Sacramento, CA. Outside w/ Southeast Exposure
MoreWater said:
Now you tell us...lol

Hafta agree on the cool workplace - can't imagine mine telling me to go sniff the trilliums!
Hehe, yeah. I saw a good opportunity and I'm really thinking that I did the right thing by jumping in with both feet.

Here are some more photos. I took a walk after work tonight, this twilight time is my favorite of the day, it was very peaceful and new things are blooming every day. I am thinking I might try to take an evening walk 3-5x a week throughout the season.

Okay, most of these I at least know the common names of.

Squirrel Corn. I love the foliage.


Solomon's Seal


Cyp. parviflorum var. pubescens - the first two are getting close! They're actually why I went tonight, had to check up on them so I wouldn't miss them over the weekend. This is actually a newly planted area. We have a "ladyslipper trail" that I have yet to walk. Soon tho...



That Trillium I like so much. Still not sure which it is.


Virginia Bluebells. I love these!


and finally the albaflavum variety of the same...


I hope you guys don't get sick of me this summer. I am a very visual learner, so this excercise really helps me learn the names of things. Then I just have to tackle the latin names! It also helps me work on my photography skills. I just learned there is a class going on right now that I could have taken for free but it started a couple weeks ago.

Well anyway, Enjoy!
 
M

MoreWater

Guest
Well I won't be bored, so long as you stick to the plants with inconspicuous flowers. :rollhappy: Got any asarums or arisaemas around there?

I love solomon's seal too. I have 2 or 3 varieties in pots on the balc. (I'm a nut case) but one is not doing at all well. P humile is the one that does the best - about 6" tall. It's actually the easiest of all the plants I grow. :D



Here's some more detail on Trilliums, as we do sometimes talk about such stuffs here. :crazy: An obvious (sometimes) difference is size, so if you see another clump somewhere the looks kinda the same but smaller/bigger....

cueneatum
  • 16-45 cm tall
  • leaves ovate, usually widest below the middle, apex acuminate to acute, 7-18.5 cm long, 7-13 cm wide
  • stamens erect, 11-18 mm long
  • filaments 1.5-2.5 mm long, widest at base
  • anther sac openings at 90 degree or facing towards the ovary
  • connectives scarcely if at all prolonged beyong anther saces
  • ovary including stigmas ovoid to vase-shaped, 12-15 mm long, with 6 weakly defined angles or ridges when mature
  • stigmas thick, erect, slighty diverging at tips to spreading
  • flower odor generally pleasant, reminiscent of the odor of bruised Sweetshrub leaves, occasionally musty-unpleasant
  • fruit ovoid, very obscurely angled or angles no longer apparent, green or with purple streaks, mealy or pulpy fleshy, not juicy

sessile
  • 8-25 cm tall, rarely taller
  • leaves sessile (attached to stem without a petiole), broadly attached, oval to suborbicular, rounded basally to its broad attachment, 4-10 cm long, 2-8 cm wide
  • stamens straight, anthers not curved, erect, 10-23 mm long
  • filaments (stalk supporting the anthers) broad, about one-third anther length
  • anther sac openings facing towards the ovary
  • connectives projecting 1-2.5 mm beyond anther sac
  • ovary 6-angled, ovoid to globose with maturity but pyramidally narrowed to the subulate stigmas, 4-8.5 mm tall
  • stigmas up to 2 times ovary height, erect
  • flower odor pungent, spice in fresh flowers
  • fruit a dark green-purple berry, subglobose, the 6 angles somewhat winglike, fragmentally separating from the basal attachment on the receptacle

:rollhappy: we're supposed to know what "subulate" means? (=awl-shaped. I don't think I know how an awl is shaped!)

eh, whatever. I can't learn only from photos - I need details too, so..... now I should be able to tell the difference! (riiiiight)

And I still haven't figured out which Trillium I saw at the Chicago arboretum! Of course, I did not stoop to sniff..... and these sepals are waaaay longer and narrower:




I've never heard of squirrel corn - does it have tubers that they eat or something? The flowers are bleeding heartesque :)
 

Heather

Administrator
Staff member
Admin
Moderator
Joined
Jun 6, 2006
Messages
10,482
Reaction score
19
Location
Sacramento, CA. Outside w/ Southeast Exposure
MoreWater said:
Well I won't be bored, so long as you stick to the plants with inconspicuous flowers. :rollhappy: Got any asarums or arisaemas around there?
I dunno...more walks are clearly necessary!

MoreWater said:
Here's some more detail on Trilliums, as we do sometimes talk about such stuffs here. :crazy: An obvious (sometimes) difference is size, so if you see another clump somewhere the looks kinda the same but smaller/bigger....

cueneatum
  • 16-45 cm tall
  • leaves ovate, usually widest below the middle, apex acuminate to acute, 7-18.5 cm long, 7-13 cm wide
  • stamens erect, 11-18 mm long
  • filaments 1.5-2.5 mm long, widest at base
  • anther sac openings at 90 degree or facing towards the ovary
  • connectives scarcely if at all prolonged beyong anther saces
  • ovary including stigmas ovoid to vase-shaped, 12-15 mm long, with 6 weakly defined angles or ridges when mature
  • stigmas thick, erect, slighty diverging at tips to spreading
  • flower odor generally pleasant, reminiscent of the odor of bruised Sweetshrub leaves, occasionally musty-unpleasant
  • fruit ovoid, very obscurely angled or angles no longer apparent, green or with purple streaks, mealy or pulpy fleshy, not juicy

sessile
  • 8-25 cm tall, rarely taller
  • leaves sessile (attached to stem without a petiole), broadly attached, oval to suborbicular, rounded basally to its broad attachment, 4-10 cm long, 2-8 cm wide
  • stamens straight, anthers not curved, erect, 10-23 mm long
  • filaments (stalk supporting the anthers) broad, about one-third anther length
  • anther sac openings facing towards the ovary
  • connectives projecting 1-2.5 mm beyond anther sac
  • ovary 6-angled, ovoid to globose with maturity but pyramidally narrowed to the subulate stigmas, 4-8.5 mm tall
  • stigmas up to 2 times ovary height, erect
  • flower odor pungent, spice in fresh flowers
  • fruit a dark green-purple berry, subglobose, the 6 angles somewhat winglike, fragmentally separating from the basal attachment on the receptacle

:rollhappy: we're supposed to know what "subulate" means? (=awl-shaped. I don't think I know how an awl is shaped!)

eh, whatever. I can't learn only from photos - I need details too, so..... now I should be able to tell the difference! (riiiiight)

And I still haven't figured out which Trillium I saw at the Chicago arboretum! Of course, I did not stoop to sniff..... and these sepals are waaaay longer and narrower:


Thanks for the more info on Trilliums - I will have to look closer at the photos on the "in bloom" board on Monday...

MoreWater said:
I've never heard of squirrel corn - does it have tubers that they eat or something? The flowers are bleeding heartesque :)
They are. I think the common name refers to the fact that they look a little bit like corn kernals that squirrels like to eat. We have a lot of Dutchman's Breeches too and apparently people often confuse the two (I'm not sure why, the latter looks like a pair of breeches! :confused: )
 

kentuckiense

Debaser
Joined
Jun 8, 2006
Messages
2,103
Reaction score
0
Location
Richmond, VA
Heather said:
We have a lot of Dutchman's Breeches too and apparently people often confuse the two (I'm not sure why, the latter looks like a pair of breeches! :confused: )
Same genus, actually: Dicentra

However, I agree that they are pretty easy to tell apart... I mean, one looks like britches!
 

Latest posts

Top