Some Australian terrestrials

Slippertalk Orchid Forum

Help Support Slippertalk Orchid Forum:

emydura

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
7,330
Reaction score
824
Location
Canberra, Australia
I love the helmet orchids (Corysanthes). There are three species of helmet orchids that grow in the region I live.

Mountain Helmet Orchid - Corysanthes grumula. The rarest of the three species. Seriously cute. It is the only one of the three I don't grow.

Mountain%20Helmet%20Orchid.jpg


Mountain%20Helmet%20Orchid%202.jpg



Slaty Helmet Orchid - Corysanthes incurvus. Commonly grown. Small in size.

Corysanthes%20incurva.jpg



Bristly Helmet Orchid - Corysanthes hispida. I have shown this one before. The most spectacular of the three species.

Corybas%20hispidula%204.jpg


Corybas%20hispidula.jpg



It is the most common and widespread of the three species in the ACT. They can be found in large colonies as can be seen here.

hispidis%20DSC_4929.jpg
 

emydura

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
7,330
Reaction score
824
Location
Canberra, Australia
In situ! Me like!

Just wondering why you call them Corysanthes as opposed to Corybas?

I have always called them Corybas myself. If you do a google search you mostly come up with Corybas. These were originally called Corysanthes in 1810 but then were lumped in with Corybas which had been named in 1807. In 2002, Coysanthes was reinstated as a distinct genus. A recently published book that I bought of local orchids refers to them as Corysanthes and the people I go surveying with does the same. I seemed to be the only person calling them Corybas. So I have joined everyone else and am now calling them Corysanthes.
 
Last edited:

emydura

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
7,330
Reaction score
824
Location
Canberra, Australia
A couple of species growing in situ not far from where I live. Sadly this location is ear marked for housing development, so they may be lost in the future. It is a lovely colony of Pterostylis nutans. This species is quite an easy one to grow and can multiply fast.


Pterostylis nutans - Nodding Greenhood

Pterostylis%20nutans%20%28Nodding%20Greenhood%29.jpg


Pterostylis%20nutans%20%28Nodding%20Greenhood%29%202.jpg



Caladenia caerulea - Blue Fingers

Caladenia%20caerulea.jpg
 
Last edited:

GuRu

experienced greenhorn
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
5,361
Reaction score
1,602
Location
Germany
...........Sadly this location is ear marked for housing development, so they may be lost in the future.......
Great to see this plants in situ. 👍 Does nobody care that there live protected plants in the earmarked area ?
 

emydura

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
7,330
Reaction score
824
Location
Canberra, Australia
. 👍 Does nobody care that there live protected plants in the earmarked area ?

The ACT is running out of land, and the population is growing, so land developers are keen to use any land they can get. This small parcel of land has some remnant forest so is quite valuable. All around it has been cleared. I think it is worth saving. I am currently involved with a group that is surveying the orchids in it over the next year. If we find any rare species then it may be possible to stop the development. The two species above are quite common, so these themselves won't help protect the area. There is a petition to the local parliament to try and get the land protected.
 

GuRu

experienced greenhorn
Joined
Oct 23, 2006
Messages
5,361
Reaction score
1,602
Location
Germany
The ACT is running out of land, and the population is growing, so land developers are keen to use any land they can get. This small parcel of land has some remnant forest so is quite valuable. All around it has been cleared. I think it is worth saving. I am currently involved with a group that is surveying the orchids in it over the next year. If we find any rare species then it may be possible to stop the development. The two species above are quite common, so these themselves won't help protect the area. There is a petition to the local parliament to try and get the land protected.
David, good luck and may your efforts be successful.
 

FlaskandFlora

Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2022
Messages
7
Reaction score
3
Location
Ohio
neat! I just received a bag of P. curta tubers in the mail today. What do you suggest planting them in? I can provide a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions for them, so whatever they need can be provided. Growing in Central Ohio, USA, Zone 6b.
 

emydura

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
7,330
Reaction score
824
Location
Canberra, Australia
neat! I just received a bag of P. curta tubers in the mail today. What do you suggest planting them in? I can provide a wide range of temperature and humidity conditions for them, so whatever they need can be provided. Growing in Central Ohio, USA, Zone 6b.

PterostyIis curta is pretty tolerant. It will grow well in most things. I grow my Australian terrestrials in a good quality seedling/cutting mix (Debco) which tend to drain well, which is important. I add a pinch of blood and bone to the potting medium. As for temperature, they are pretty cold tolerant. I grow mine outside here in Canberra, where it does get below freezing. They actually grow naturally in Canberra. But they do grow under a canopy, which protects them from the frost. My understanding is that Zone 6b is extremely cold, colder than what I experience. So I think this will be a bit too cold for this species. I dare say you are going to have to grow it in a slightly warmer protected area.

There is a lot of good cultural information at this link - CULTURE OF FAST MULTIPLYING (FM) TERRESTRIAL ORCHIDS
 

Guldal

ST Supporter
Supporting Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2017
Messages
3,689
Reaction score
1,772
Location
Copenhagen, Denmark
Thank you, David! And WAUW! What's not to like about it.. and what a specimen plant (plant looks pretty big, but I wonder, what is the pot size?). Kudos for culture!

[ My Bel Royal] ... flowers at this time every year. Fortunately always in time for our Spring show. It has won grand champion a couple of times previously, but last weekend it was beaten by [this] Pterostylis curta of all things.
Well, now knowing the full story, I think it was a smart move of the judges to choose another of your magnificent plants as champion of the show. Could be, I suppose, rather disencouraging for the rest of the lot with your Bel Royal going away with the prize every single time. And thinking of it, this choice even further cements your status as the (or one of the) undisputed mastergrower(s) of ACT, if not the Southern hemisphere! 😉
 
Last edited:

Linus_Cello

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 18, 2011
Messages
3,730
Reaction score
336
Location
Washington DC, USA
PterostyIis curta is pretty tolerant. It will grow well in most things. I grow my Australian terrestrials in a good quality seedling/cutting mix (Debco) which tend to drain well, which is important. I add a pinch of blood and bone to the potting medium. As for temperature, they are pretty cold tolerant. I grow mine outside here in Canberra, where it does get below freezing. They actually grow naturally in Canberra. But they do grow under a canopy, which protects them from the frost. My understanding is that Zone 6b is extremely cold, colder than what I experience. So I think this will be a bit too cold for this species. I dare say you are going to have to grow it in a slightly warmer protected area.

There is a lot of good cultural information at this link - CULTURE OF FAST MULTIPLYING (FM) TERRESTRIAL ORCHIDS

Are your winters dry? In the US east coast, we have often wet cold winters (I'm supposedly in zone 6b also, but the last couple of winters were zone 8).
 

emydura

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
7,330
Reaction score
824
Location
Canberra, Australia
Thank you, David! And WAUW! What's not to like about it.. and what a specimen plant (plant looks pretty big, but I wonder, what is the pot size?). Kudos for culture!


Well, now knowing the full story, I think it was a smart move of the judges to choose another of your magnificent plants as champion of the show. Could be, I suppose, rather disencouraging for the rest of the lot with your Bel Royal going away with the prize every single time. And thinking of it, this choice even further cements your status as the (or one of the) undisputed mastergrower(s) of ACT, if not the Southern hemisphere! 😉

Thanks Jens. I enjoyed your hyperbole. :)

I was told at our societies orchid meeting last night that the variegated form comes from Hastings down in Victoria. It is not too far from Melbourne. Apparently this is the only variegated form of the species.
 

emydura

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
7,330
Reaction score
824
Location
Canberra, Australia
Are your winters dry? In the US east coast, we have often wet cold winters (I'm supposedly in zone 6b also, but the last couple of winters were zone 8).

No, our winters are not dry. These terrestrial orchids like to be quite moist over winter. In fact, the Spring flowering species flower better after good winter rains.
 
Top