sangii on a stalk!!

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quaker

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Are there any explanations as to why this is growing on a stalk? I have had it as a small plant for 4years. During this time growth was ( and still is ) very slow. It is now quite a large plant with a single growth which is in the correct position in the substrate. Never seen this before ---- someone must have!!

Ed
 

Rick

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Is this attached to the plant in the background?

I used to see "stolonous" type growth fairly frequently in barbatat types (which includes sangii), and we used to think it might have something to do with there habit of growing in leaf litter, where they grow on stolons to keep from getting burried.
Another theory was that the substrate is not to the liking of the roots so the plant is trying to "climb out" of the substrate.

Since going to low K feeding, I'm not seeing stolonous growth in barbarta any more, and older growths (pre low K feeding) that are on the ends of long stems are producing roots that are going into the substrate. So it seemed to me that these climbing plants were having problems with the substrate rather than some natural inclination to climb.

Seeing similar effects with Phrag besseae which have a reputation for climbing out of the pot.
 

Stone

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I've seen it a few times on some seedlings. you need to build up a mossy mix up around the stem and hold it in place with little stakes so as to cover the base of the plant. It should be ok after that.
 

eggshells

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Just had this issue with a venustum this morning. I potted it deeper.
 

quaker

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Just had this issue with a venustum this morning. I potted it deeper.
Can't plant this one deeper because it would bury the other growth also can't build it up for the same reason. I will check to see if the secondary growth is attached and will take a pic when out of the pot.

Ed
 

SlipperKing

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What about wrapping damp moss a round the base of the new plant? Then twist-tie the moss in place. The wet/dry cycle of the moss will stimulate roots after which, cut the stem off near the base and pot it up.
 

SlipperKing

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In the past, with hybrids doing this same thing, I would just cut it off near the older plant and the sport up. They narly always rooted up. With this species being more vaulable you may want to wrap the moss a round the base with a twist tie as I suggested earilier.

UPDATE OOPS! I was typing inbetween you posting PICS! Question; Is this a feashly collected plant?
 

Susie11

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I had this happen to my besseae var flavum. I potted the older growth in a deeper pot and let the substate cover the base and crown. It has grown really well since then. I have now lost almost all of the old fan leaves that where submerged in the bark but there was no rot or any problems. It is advised not to detach it from the mother plant as it still needs it so I left it attached and now the older fan is almost gone anyway. The new plant is growing really well and I should hopefully have spike soon.


It is now potted in a deeper pot which allowed me to submerge the old fan under the medium so that the newer growth with the stolon could sit just on top of the medium. It is growing well there was no harm to the older fan.
 

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