sangii in s/h??

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Candace

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Has anyone been brave enough to try a sangii in s/h? I've lost a tigrinum in s/h so don't want to lose a leg to go with my arm. Got my early b-day gift today from Bloomfields. Looks nice and want it to stay that way;)
 

Rick

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I've never tried sangii in SH. I have 2 that are doing fine in a CHC mix with added chopped moss. For me these guys tend to run their roots near the top of the pot, staying close to the moss that overgrows it. If nothing else, watch the humidity and keep it very high around them.
 

bwester

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I like that Lance... I tip my hat to you.
 

Candace

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As I told someone else via email just now...as long as it isn't new PA. Go for it.
Sure, sure let me be the guinea pig!:poke:

I have 2 that are doing fine in a CHC mix with added chopped moss.
I have all my plants in s/h. I don't mess around with plants in different mediums. Too hard to take care of and water that way. I guess I'll just bite the bullet and switch it over. The only expensive paph I've lost in s/h was my tigrinum. My other 150 or so paphs love it. I was hoping to hear that someone else has done it and had success so that I won't sweat it. I still haven't replaced the tigrinum, as I don't know if it was a fluke and am fearful to have another dimp.

s/h = the mark of the beast
Still haven't tried the new prime agra so won't argue against it being the work of the devil:poke:
 

bwester

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tigrinum in s/h?????
Shame on you, Candace
 

Candace

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No shame in using a successful(for me) method on all my paphs. This was on the only Antec plant I've received that wasn't in pristine shape. The tigrinum I got through them on ebay didn't have the greatest roots. I probably should have held off on putting it in s/h, but I'd already unpotted it and thought it would bounce back. Not...
 

Hien

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If you are worrying and agonizing so much over the decision, you should keep it in its original pot & medium. let it adjusts to your condition for a few months.
 

gonewild

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NYEric said:
Lien Luu said they like a decomposed media. I'd put it in coconut chips and sphagnum, or something equally organic.
Some thoughts....

I don't think organic or inorganic media really matters. What matters is the environment around the roots.

Liking decomposed media might indicate they do better with their roots kept more moist than normal and also with less air around the roots.
When growing in Leca (or s/h) this could be emulated by top dressing the media with a finer material to decrease the exposure to the atmosphere. This could be done with sphag moss or oyster shell?

It may also indicate they require higher nutrient levels than others. As the media decomposes it does provide more available nutrients for the plant, both by releasing minerals during decomposition and also by an increase of cation exchange.
The regular fertilizer applications of leca culture (s/h or hydroponic) would provide for this as well.
 

Candace

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I think you're right Hien, and will probably let it sit for a while and grow a little bigger before making a change. It will be my one of my only plants in an organic mix.

The mix it's in is a small grade cocochip, charcoal, spongerock, perlite blend. Once it gets a bit bigger though, old prime agra will be its new home!!
 

gonewild

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Hien said:
If you are worrying and agonizing so much over the decision, you should keep it in its original pot & medium. let it adjusts to your condition for a few months.
I think you are always better off repotting into a media that you are familiar with and know how to grow in. Plants don't need months to adjust to new conditions. They shift gears and adapt to environmental changes almost instantly. That is not to say you will see the results, good or bad, instantly however.
 

Candace

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I've always thought that too, Lance. I guess I just need to suck it up and do it. Boy am I wishy washy today, or what?
 

gonewild

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Candace said:
I've always thought that too, Lance. I guess I just need to suck it up and do it. Boy am I wishy washy today, or what?
Just do it! :poke:
Take an adventure and learn something from it.
Explore an unknown frontier.
You have said many times your plants grow well for you, so have confidence in your acquired growing skills and proceed without regret.
:wink:
 

paphioland

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gonewild said:
Some thoughts....

I don't think organic or inorganic media really matters. What matters is the environment around the roots.

Liking decomposed media might indicate they do better with their roots kept more moist than normal and also with less air around the roots.
When growing in Leca (or s/h) this could be emulated by top dressing the media with a finer material to decrease the exposure to the atmosphere. This could be done with sphag moss or oyster shell?

It may also indicate they require higher nutrient levels than others. As the media decomposes it does provide more available nutrients for the plant, both by releasing minerals during decomposition and also by an increase of cation exchange.
The regular fertilizer applications of leca culture (s/h or hydroponic) would provide for this as well.
I would disagree with organic or inorganic doesn't really matter. True what matters is the environment around the roots and it is impossible to replicate aspects of organic material with inorganic material. ie types of mycorrhiza that colonize the media, salt, nutrient levels, carbon, aminoacids, warmth released by decaying media. I mean no one knows all the difference. While plants may grow just fine in inorganic medium I don't believe it can be made the same.
 

gonewild

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paphioland said:
I would disagree with organic or inorganic doesn't really matter. True what matters is the environment around the roots and it is impossible to replicate aspects of organic material with inorganic material. ie types of mycorrhiza that colonize the media, salt, nutrient levels, carbon, aminoacids, warmth released by decaying media. I mean no one knows all the difference. While plants may grow just fine in inorganic medium I don't believe it can be made the same.
True, it is difficult to know what is going on within organic media. But that is all the more reason to use an inorganic media where you can know what is going on.

As organic media decomposes the root environment changes in a curve fashion. At some point of the curve of change the environment may be perfect for the plant but on both ends of the curve the environment may not be perfect. Because the media is constantly changing (decomposing) it is not possible to maintain it at a perfect environment level at all times.

With inorganic media where decomposition does not occur it is possible to maintain a perfect root environment. That is of course once you establish what a perfect environment is.

Remember also that types of mycorrhiza do colonize inorganic medias. Salt and nutrient levels are easy to maintain in inorganic medias. I think plants get most or all of their carbon from the atmosphere? Plants produce aminoacids from soil nutrients but I don't think they absorb them from the growing media itself. Warmth released by decaying media may be a detriment especially in an environment that is too warm already such as summertime in a greenhouse or windowsill. Decaying organic matter also emits ethylene gas which can cause early wilt of a flower.

It seems to me a perfect media for small container growing is one that does not decay.
 

NYEric

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I just noted what Lien said. He said that most people mess up sangii because they want it in fresh media but it needs damp, decaying media.
 

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