Repotting Paph that's grown too big

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My Paphiopedilum Pinocchio that I've had for many years, has grown really big. In fact last spring I repotted it for the first time ever, as I realized that this poor plant had been neglected for years. I was about time for a repot. The dilemma I faced was: to repot into a bigger pot or split the plant and have 2 or 3 of them. I would have preferred splitting it up, simply because it's also got some old dead growths (what do you call it on a Paph, it's not a pseudobulb?) right in the middle. However, the plant had a flower spike coming up, and I was afraid of splitting it up right then.

To be honest I could have waited with repotting it, but my realization was that I'd had this Paph for years and it had NEVER been repotted, after reading online about decomposing orchid media, I could only imagine how bad it must be. My other orchids, the Phals were in pretty poor condition, in some cases the media had white spots which I think must have been some sort of mould.

Anyway so I repotted the Paph into a larger pot, and my idea was to repot it again once it's done blooming. Now it's done blooming. However now I'm doubting what to do. Should I repot it again and split it? Or should I wait until spring, and then a year will have passed since it's last repot?

What I'd also like to add is that I repotted it in large bark (since I only had one type of bark because of the Phals) and spaghnum moss and perlite. I went to an orchid nursery a few weeks ago and they showed me what they plant their Paphs in, and they used a mixture of small and large bark and perlite. I asked them about spaghnum moss and they thought that it's too cold for the Paph that they don't like to get cold roots, something like that, and they said only to use a small percentage of it. I suppose it also does depend on where you live, but yeah we have cooler climate here in northern Europe and during the largest part of the day I'm not home and so the heating is also not on. It's mostly between 20C-19C (68-66.2F).

Any suggestions? I'll attach some pictures from last spring (this was in April I believe) when I repotted it for the first time.
 

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Oh and just to add to that there are some new small growths (or whatever you call it) coming too I've noticed.
 

littlefrog

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You could break it up such that you can remove dead or yellowing growths, and then put everything back into one pot. Also you can repot these more than once a year, especially if you think you need to change the medium.

Be careful of switching to new media - just because it works for somebody doesn't mean it will work for you. Lots of plants get killed this way. Experiment on plants that aren't valuable to you. Or if your plant is big enough, split it into two pots, one with your old mix and one with the new. That is a good experiment.
 

mrhappyrotter

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It's late enough in the year that I'd highly recommend waiting until spring to repot, especially if the growing area is on the cool side. I generally reserve repotting this time of year for emergencies only because things tend to languish and sulk otherwise.

For most orchids, I tend to be a divider, personally. I like having an extra division of prized plants as a backup in case something happens to the main plant, and it's nice to share divisions with friends or even sell if it's good enough. I do let some of my plants grow out a bit, but it's harder to find size for large plants, much easier to find a spot under the lights for a couple smaller divisions, generally speaking. Also, most of my Paphs don't really clump well and sort of lose their aesthetic (to me) once they get to a certain size. Of course, like littlefrog mentioned, you can remove the dead / dying older growths and put everything back into one pot which gets around that issue somewhat even for plants that don't naturally clump.
 
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Thank you all for your replies. I might just wait until spring then. My house is a bit on the colder side now, true. I think it's probably not urgent as the plant seems to be ok. The important thing is I guess to fertilize every now and then, I even got some of that calcium in powder (the orchid nursery recommended it last time I went there).

I will divide it next time for sure, those dead brown growths are just unsightly. And I agree with mrhappyrotter, it looks nicer with smaller plants, and I might give some away. Besides it will give me some more space, so that I can buy new orchids. I would really like to get another Paph, as this is the only one I have, and I absolutely love Paphs.
 

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